Tag Archives: alan moore

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Dunks by Quoting Alan Moore and Watchmen

2019 is shaping up to be an interesting year for politics and one of the stars already is newly elected Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez who has taken social media by storm.

The new member regularly uses social media to pull back the curtain of the political process but also has no problem using it to slapback haters.

Case in point, an article released today by Politico talking about how “exasperated” Democrats are trying to rein her in.

She wasn’t having it and responded back on Twitter with a quote from Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.

The quote comes from Rorschach who is in jail at this point in the comic and he looks at it as a positive being closer to the criminals he wants to punish…

AOC 1 Establishment Dems 0

Preview: From Hell: Master Edition #2

From Hell: Master Edition #2

Alan Moore (w) • Eddie Campbell (a & c)

Five unsolved murders. Two of the greatest creators in the history of comics. One sprawling conspiracy, one metropolis on the brink of the 20th century, and one bloody-minded Ripper ushering London into the modern age of terror. The award-winning bestseller FROM HELL, often ranked among the greatest graphic novels of all time, takes on haunting new dimensions in FROM HELL: The Master Edition, enhanced with impressionistic hues by Eddie Campbell himself.

This volume contains chapters 2 and 3, as well as all of the original annotations.

FC • 72 pages • $7.99

Around the DC Universe: Titans, Swamp Thing, and More!

Originals

Stuff is finally starting to come together on Titans. This week saw Starfire and Beast Boy pulled into the main thread alongside Dick and Rachel. I like how they’re using Starfire to add an element of real mystery to Raven’s story line. Just about everyone knows what Rachel’s big reveal is but it will be interesting to see exactly how Kory fits into it. That said, after the Hawk and Dove episode I’m worried they won’t keep her core background as an alien intact. The juxtaposition of sci-fi and fantasy elements is a feature of superhero comics that has been largely neglected on TV and it would be nice for Titans to break the mold.

Comics

Between Halloween and recent casting news regarding the upcoming Swamp Thing series, this is the perfect time to read some of the best horror comics ever published by DC or anyone else. Alan Moore‘s run on The Saga of Swamp Thing is one of the high water marks of the medium as groundbreaking as The Dark Knight Returns or Watchmen and maybe even more influential by virtue of the fact that it was an ongoing monthly series. The earliest issues with art by Stephen Bissette and and John Tottlebein are currently on DC Universe and it actually stands apart from the bulk of the run quite well though you do miss out on the early appearances of John Constantine. What’s here is more than worth it, a look into some of the murkier corners of the DC Universe including a guided tour of Hell itself. Be warned that there are many uncomfortable themes including rape, incest and necrophilia. These are not comics for the squeamish either. No evokes the corrupting atmosphere of body horror quite like the team of Bissette and Totlebein. If you’re a big fan of movies like John Carpenter’s The Thing or David Cronenberg’s The Fly, then The Saga of Swamp Thing is a must read. Available on DC Universe in The Saga of The Swamp Thing (1982) #21-34 and Swamp Thing Annual (1985) #2. Read the Swamp Thing Annual between issues 31 & 32.

Technical Issues

After almost 2 months since release it’s time for an update on technical issues. Overall I’d say DC Universe has gotten a lot better. The community portion of the site has added moderator tags and restricted one of the boards to moderator posts so it’s much easier to get official announcements.The inability to directly interact with other users remains a stumbling block but there has been improved functionality in terms of what you can post and the ability to bookmark threads. Communication  is greatly improved but there are still blind spots. Death of Superman was up for the better part of October missing key issues in the story. This was never addressed despite the fact that this was pointed out by myself and other users in several spots on the community and through direct communication with customer service using the form available through the app itself.

The rotation of special feature comic titles continues to prove frustrating. While DC has mostly been adding worthwhile titles on a regular schedule, the rate at which they rotate out is inconsistent and you have to dig to find out how long a given issue will be available. It would be nice to know in advance how much time there is to read a given special feature without have to trawl through a message board. Similarly three out of four issues of Batman: Year One, which I had thought would be part of the regular library until at least the end of this month, mysteriously vanished while issues of Batman ’66 seemed to appear without warning.

To add a further wrinkle to the matter DC originally stated that their full digital library would be available for purchase in October, presumably at a per issue price similar to ComiXology (though DC has stated that the two services’ libraries will not sync meaning you would need to purchase a book twice to read it on both apps). This note has now been replaced with one that states more comics are coming soon. Whether this means that DC is planning to retool DC Universe to have an unlimited library similar to Marvel’s remains to be seen. It does seem unlikely that DC, a company that relies far much on “evergreen” trades like The Dark Knight Returns or Watchmen, would want to hazard risking those sales by making such titles available digitally for such a low price point (especially given the cost of producing their original shows) but there is also a lot of discontent in the community with the current vault approach. If anyone from DC is reading this I would suggest a hybrid approach: regular monthly titles released in a style similar to Marvel Unlimited with a six month or even a year lead time to preserve comic shop sales and a rotating, themed  selection of the best selling boutique material in trade. This should allow for a better value for money for readers who are primarily interested in new material while DC is able to maintain the value of their older titles.

HBO’s Watchmen Gets a First Teaser Look

Watchmen is getting a new television show on HBO. Based on the classic comic series from Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons and published by DC Comics, the show is under production and we now have our first teaser look.

The show isn’t a direct adaptation of the comic series, instead it’s set in the world of.

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Who Watches The Watchmen? #WatchmenHBO

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The 24 Panels Anthology Features, Alan Moore, Kieron Gillen, and More to Benefit the Grenfell Fire Survivors

Image Comics has announced the forthcoming 24 Panels Anthology, curated by New York Times bestselling creator Kieron Gillen with co-editor Steve Thompson, and featuring work from some of the most celebrated storytellers and artists in the industry. The charity anthology will benefit the survivors of the Grenfell fire.

In June 2017, the Grenfell fire killed 72 people in a 24-story tower block in West London. 24 Panels is an anthology comic to support the PTSD needs of the survivors. The 24 Panels Anthology will be comprised of 24 stories, each no longer than 24 panels. Half drawn from professional creators who volunteered their time and half drawn from open submissions, 24 PANELS is about community, hope, and (most of all) raising as much money as possible.

Al Ewing, Alan Moore, Alex de Campi, Antony Johnston, Caspar Wijngaard, Dan Watters, Dilraj Mann, Doug Braithwaite, Gavin Mitchell, Laurie Penny, Leigh Alexander, Lizz Lunney, Melinda Gebbie, Paul Cornell, Rachael Smith, Ram V, Robin Hoelzemann, Rosy Higgins, Sara Kenney, Sarah Gordon, Ted Brandt, Tom Humberstone, Tula Lotay, and more will contribute to 24 Panels.

24 Panels (Diamond Code SEP180079, ISBN: 978-1-5343-1126-8) will be available in comic book stores on Wednesday, November 21st. The final order cutoff for comics retailers is Monday, October 8th.

It will be available in bookstores on Tuesday, November 27th and can be pre-ordered at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-a-Million, Indiebound, and Indigo.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Tempest #1 Sells Out with a Second Printing to Come

Top Shelf Productions and IDW Publishing have announced that The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Vol. IV): The Tempest #1, the first issue in the final miniseries by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill, has already sold through its first printing at the distributor level, less than 24 hours after its release on July 11th.

The Tempest has attracted considerable interest not only as the grand finale of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen saga but also as a swan song for Moore and O’Neill.

Retailers may reorder The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Vol. IV): The Tempest #1 using the Diamond Comic Distributors order code JUN188003.

Music Icon Sting Announces Participation in the Constantine 30th Anniversary

In a special video, worldwide music icon Sting revealed he will pen the foreword to the John Constantine: Hellblazer: 30th Anniversary Celebration commemorative collection. Sting’s foreword will take on the perspective of the Golden Boy, Constantine’s alternate-universe twin, touching on his relationship with the occult detective over the years.

While wearing the iconic trenchcoat, Sting sees the resemblance between himself and the iconic comic character.

Starting with his first appearance, a debut penned by legendary writer Alan Moore, Constantine has served as an enduring and controversial pop culture character—an exorcist and demonologist, master of the dark arts, and the lead of DC Vertigo’s longest-running and most successful title.

The commemorative collection will explore the complete history of the series with four one-page essays written by Hellblazer author Rich Handley. It will also include a comprehensive timeline of Constantine’s life and three one-page stories featured in John Constantine: Hellblazer issues #1, 2 and 4. Memorable stories from Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Garth Ennis, Brian Azzarello, Paul Jenkins, Jamie Delano and others reflect the best of the long-lasting series, including Hellblazer issues #11, 27, 41, 63, 120, 146, 229 and 240 and Saga of the Swamp Thing #37, where the character was officially introduced.

John Constantine: Hellblazer: 30th Anniversary Celebration commemorative collection will be available October 30.

Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s From Hell Gets a Master Edition Starting in September

For decades, the award-winning graphic novel From Hell has welcomed readers into the grandeur and grime of London in the late 1800s. Beginning in September, readers old and new will experience From Hell as never before. The From Hell Master Edition presents Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell’s Victorian masterpiece as a ten-issue serial, thoroughly restored and revised “for color, clarity, and continuity” by Eddie Campbell himself.

From Hell: Master Edition #1 (of 10) will be released exclusively through comic shops and digital retailers in September 2018.

Review: Doomsday Clock #1

And so here we are — the “big event” that all of DC Rebirth has been leading up to, Geoff Johns and Gary Frank’s eagerly anticipated/thoroughly dreaded (depending on your point of view) DCU/Watchmen mash-up, Doomsday Clock. The lines between the two formerly-separate fictitious universes were blurred, of course, in last year’s DC Universe Rebirth Special, and here they’re completely wiped out. We’ve known it was coming, now it’s arrived — and it wants five bucks a month from you for the next year as it plays out over the course of 12 issues. Should you do what it (and, specifically, DC) wants?

Lots of critics are answering that question with an emphatic “yes,” some no doubt charmed by the free pancake mix and maple syrup that preview copies of the book came packaged with (DC shrewdly, but wisely, calculating that many comics critics — like many comics creators — are fucking starving), while others seem to genuinely like the fruits of Johns’ and Frank’s “imaginations.” Allow me, then, to do what I’m best at and piss on everyone’s Corn Fla — err, pancake breakfast.

Granted, to say I wasn’t expecting much from Doomsday Clock would be putting things mildly, but I was genuinely taken aback by just how much I despised this thing. Frank’s art is certainly competent enough, I suppose, highly detailed but utterly devoid of personality, a triumph of style over substance, and Brad Anderson‘s colors are a reasonable enough computerized approximation of original Watchmen colorist John Higgins‘ singular palette, albeit with more gradations in regards to shade and hue, but hey, you know what they say about lipstick and pigs — and this story is one hell of an oinker.

Johns has clearly read Watchmen dozens, if not hundreds, of times over the years — but the entire point (hell, points) of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons‘ seminal, transformative classic was just as clearly lost on him. Every page — in fact very nearly every panel — of Watchmen was layered with thematic, conceptual, even allegorical meaning, but if you’re a facile, “surface-level” reader? Hey, it’s just a clever super-hero “whodunit” with a decidedly dark tone. Issue one of Doomsday Clock makes it abundantly clear what sort of reader Johns is.

It makes it abundantly clear what sort of writer he is, as well — one whose abilities are dramatically limited by his reading skills. Nobody apart from the most continuity-obsessed, intellectually adolescent fanboys have ever even wondered  how you could cross over the DC and Watchmen “universes,” never mind what would happen once you did so, and for that reason I really can’t fathom how anyone apart from a continuity-obsessed, intellectually adolescent fanboy would find what’s going on in these pages remotely interesting : it’s 1992 (a 1992 where variations of the term “deplorables” are in common use, where a Brexit-type event has triggered to the collapse of the EU, and where there’s a wall along the US/Mexico border — even though President Goldenshower isn’t in office, Robert Redford is? Does anyone even edit Johns’ scripts for such basics as logical plausibility?) on “Earth-Watchmen,” and things are a mess with Adrian Veidt’s scheme exposed and the purported “world’s smartest man” the subject of a global manhunt. Rorschach is on the case, but they make it clear pretty quickly that this Rorschach isn’t that Rorschach (special points for tone-deafness on Johns’ part for putting a black guy in the costume made infamous by a racist, civil-rights-trampling, vigilante lunatic — again, where’s an editor when you need one?), and that his part in whatever the hell’s going on global meltdown-wise isn’t what it seems. In fact, he’s working for —- fuck it, spoilers and all that — who’s very much alive but — fuck it, spoilers and all that again — and they’ve got a plan to — by this point you already know I’m not really going to give any “big” details away. Then we wrap up with a scene of Clark Kent on “Earth-0” (or whatever it’s called these days) having a dream about his parents’ death that doesn’t jibe with what we’ve known before.

Now, plot twists were a key component of Watchmen, of course, but they were the icing on a damn deep and rich cake. Here, though, those twists are all that Johns and Frank are serving up. This is a cheap, “flashy” story dependent on “wowing” you with one surprise after the next — but again, those surprises will only be effective if you give a shit about this cash-grab premise in the first place, and no reason for the skeptical, or even merely curious, to “buy in” is ever offered by these low-rent “creators.”

Hell, truth be told, they’re like Trump in that I don’t think they know how to reach beyond a hard-core base. Watchmen was the comic you could give to people who don’t read comics, but in order to begin to understand Doomsday Clock you need to have been deeply invested in the intricate minutiae of DC product (let’s just call it what it is) for a couple of decades or more. If nine-panel grids and grumbled “hrrrmmm”s are enough to convince you that Johns and Frank are “honoring” the legacy of Moore and Gibbons, then I guess this’ll do in a pinch, but for anyone else? Say, somebody with a modestly-developed sense of discernment? This comic is as insulting to you as it is to Watchmen‘s creators, neither of whom were even given so much as a courtesy call to let them know this toxic sludge was about to slide down the pipeline.

Johns has made some public statements clearly designed to mollify concerned parties, saying that this series won’t be saddled with any “tie-ins” to other books because he doesn’t want to “dilute the Watchmen brand” (as if its very existence doesn’t do precisely that), and that he doesn’t intend to wrap things up with a Superman vs. Doctor Manhattan fight but, rather, with a “conversation” between the two of them — but that presupposes that he has anything worth saying about either character. Based on the evidence offered by Doomsday Clock #1, I’d say it’s painfully obvious that he doesn’t. I won’t be sticking around to find out, of course — and neither should you. So enjoy those pancakes, everybody — they sure taste better than the shit sandwich that came with them.

Story: Geoff Johns Art: Gary Frank Colors: Brad Anderson
Story: 0  Art: 4 Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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