Review: Justice League of America #3

jla003There is a decent amount of exposure for the Justice League at DC Comics at the moment.  Not even counting the Justice League United outlier which contains none of the core group of heroes, there are presently three series containing the stories of the Justice League in Justice League, Justice League of America and Justice League 3001.  With three different series, the level of quality seems to vacillate between the great, the average and the not-so-good.  While Darkseid War is elevating the principal series to a pretty high level, and while Justice League 3001 is dragging it down somewhat, Justice League of America continues unabated to tell its standard Justice League story, only with a few twists.

It could actually be said that the story for Justice League of America is still somewhat in its infancy.  After all there is not a lot of cohesion between the separate plot points except in that they all involve Superman to some degree.  Green Lantern and the Flash are stranded on a faraway planet which seems to be Krypton.  The god Rao has come to Earth to provide salvation for its inhabitants, and the team of scientists dealing with temporal energies is trying to find clues as to how Superman continues to show up through their portals on the wrong side of a battle.  Aside from the first issue which included the majority of the heroes together, they are now mostly fragmented into their smaller groups which are dealing with their own smaller problems, not usually one of the hallmarks of a team based series.

While the presentation of the story is sometimes lacking in direction, it is not necessarily to the detriment of the story.  Instead the story here feels like one of the late days of the Silver Age of the Justice League of America.  It hols together pretty well, but it equally seems to be somewhat of the serialized concept of telling the story and then forgetting about it.  For those who are fans of superheroes, this might hit the mark, but compared to some other stories involving modern heroes, it also might seem a bit commonplace, not really trying to be much more than what it is.  For better or worse that is the defining characteristic of this series so far, at least until the creative team decides that it is time to prove otherwise.

Story: Bryan Hitch Art: Daniel Henriques
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read