Tag Archives: green lantern

DC Collectibles: Bring Home ‘Justice League’ Animated Action Figures on Batman Day

Straight from the screen to your shelves, DC Collectibles is gearing up to release an all-new 6-inch action figure line based on the acclaimed Justice League animated series that aired from 2001-2004. The new figures will be available exclusively for DC Universe members and can be purchased starting Batman Day, September 15, timed to the launch of the DC Universe subscription service.

The new line is an expansion of DC Collectibles’ bestselling animated action figure collection which also includes figures based on popular DC animated shows Batman: The Animated Series, The New Batman Adventures and Superman: The Animated Series.

On September 15, DC Universe members can watch the entire Justice League animated series and then head over to the “Shop” tab on the DC Universe app to purchase Batman, Wonder Woman, Superman and more of their favorite characters from the show in 3D form. Here is the official release schedule:

  • Batman, Martian Manhunter, Green Lantern and Hawkgirl will be available to purchase at launch and ship in September
  • Aquaman and Wonder Woman will be available to pre-order at launch, to ship in October
  • The Flash and Superman will be available to pre-order at launch, to ship in November

All figures are priced at $28.00 each. For a limited time only, members who purchase all eight characters will receive the whole set in November at a discounted price of $194.00. This promotion will end on November 30, 2018.

So what are you waiting for? Order the service for the chance to get your hands on these figures!

DC Collectibles in April 2019 Includes New DC Bombshells, Artists Alley, Harley Quinn and More!

Next spring DC Collectibles will unleash new DC Bombshells, anthropomorphic creatures and new statues starring Harley Quinn, Sean Murphy’s White Knight Batman, the Flash and more—all set to invade stores in April 2019.

Leading the charge just in time for spring training is a new Batwoman statue featuring artist Ant Lucia’s popular DC Bombshells design in a striking red “away uniform” variant paint color. The statue measures the same 9-inch scale as the original version and is intricately sculpted by Tim Miller.

Also in April 2019, DC Collectibles will release new cutting-edge DC Artists Alley designer vinyl figures by fan-favorite toy designer Joe Ledbetter. Ledbetter is known for his distinct, bold lines and vibrant palette and has worked with such top brands as IKEA, Swatch, Nike, Sony Music and Kidrobot. Now Ledbetter will bring his unique style to the DC universe, putting his signature anthropomorphicspin on iconic characters Batman, the Penguin, Catwoman and Robin.

Ledbetter’s 7-inch scale DC Artists Alley figures are sculpted by Joe Menna and will be offered in both a standard edition paint color and a black-and-white variant style. Each figure will also include four DC character sketch cards drawn by Ledbetter.

See below for DC Collectibles’ complete April 2019 lineup:

DC Bombshells: Batwoman Away Uniform variant statue

  • Designed by Ant Lucia
  • Sculpted by Tim Miller
  • Size: 9″ scale
  • Limited to 5,000 pieces
  • MSRP: $125.00

DC Artists Alley designer vinyl figures by Joe Ledbetter

  • Characters: Batman, Robin, the Penguin and Catwoman
  • Sculpted by Joe Menna
  • Size: 7″ scale
  • Individually numbered
  • Standard edition: Limited to 3,000 units; MSRP: $60 each
  • Black and White variant edition: Limited to 1,000 units; MSRP: $60.00 each

 

Harley Quinn Red, White & Black: Harley Quinn by Guillem March

  • Sculpted by Jonathan Matthews
  • Size: 7″ scale
  • Limited to 5,000 pieces
  • MSRP: $80.00 each

Batman Black & White: White Knight Batman statue by Sean Murphy

  • Sculpted by Jonathan Matthews
  • Size: 7″ scale
  • Limited to 5,000 pieces
  • MSRP: $80.00

 

DC Core: The Flash statue

  • Sculpted by Jay Kushwara
  • Size: 9″ scale
  • MSRP: $50.00

 

DC Designer Series: Green Lantern statue by Ivan Reis

  • Sculpted by Tony Cipriano
  • Size: 12″ scale
  • Limited to 5,000 pieces
  • MSRP: $150.00

100 Page Giant Comics from DC Come to Walmart this Summer Starting in July with Original Stories

This summer, Walmart shoppers will find it easier to discover the lore behind their favorite DC experiences as DC Entertainment has announced that a series of “giant” monthly comics will be sold exclusively in more than 3,000 participating Walmart stores around the country.

Available for $4.99, each 100-page anthology features all-new stories written exclusively for these books by some of DC’s top creative talents, including Tom King, Dan Jurgens, Brian Michael Bendis, Andy Kubert and others. Each title will also include additional story arcs drawn from fan-favorite DC eras such as the New 52, Rebirth and the New Age of DC Heroes.

Each of the four titles – Superman Giant, Justice League of America Giant, Batman Giant, and Teen Titans Giant – will arrive in stores by July 1. Beginning in August, the Superman and Justice League of America titles will arrive in week one of each month, with the second pair, Batman and Teen Titans, arriving approximately two weeks later.

The debut title lineup includes:

SUPERMAN GIANT #1

SUPERMAN GIANT #1 features chapter one of the two-part “Endurance,” an original story written by Jimmy Palmiotti with art by Tom Derenick. The Daily Planet sends Clark Kent to Tornado Alley to do a story on the area, but when the storm hits, it turns out that this mild-mannered reporter is more helpful as Superman.

The issue also includes:

THE TERRIFICS #1­ (2018) – From this year’s New Age of Heroes and born of the events of DC’s hit series DARK NIGHTS: METAL. Mr. Terrific, Metamorpho, Plastic Man and Phantom Girl are a team of heroes bound together by fate and united by the spirit of exploration and discovery. Together these heroes plumb the depths of the fantastic to learn what it means to become family.

GREEN LANTERN #1 (2005) – Written by best-selling writer Geoff Johns with art by Ethan Van Sciver and Carlos Pacheco, this first chapter launches the fan-favorite three-part story “No Fear,” in which Hal Jordan makes his return to the DC Universe as the Green Lantern, casting the light of justice on the darkest corners of Space Sector 2814.

SUPERMAN/BATMAN #1 (2003) – The iconic fan-favorite story arc, “Public Enemies,” returns, courtesy of writer Jeph Loeb, with artists Ed McGuinness and Tim Sale. Batman and Superman unite when President Lex Luthor accuses the Man of Steel of a crime against humanity and assembles a top-secret team of powerhouse heroes to bring Superman in by any means necessary.

September’s SUPERMAN GIANT #3 features Eisner Award-winning writer Tom King’s first return to the Man of Steel since his poignant and heartfelt tribute story, “For Tomorrow,” in the pages of ACTION COMICS #1000. Together with DC Master Class artist Andy Kubert, this powerhouse team will take readers on a new 12-part adventure titled “Up in the Sky!” When a little girl is kidnapped and taken from Earth, Superman embarks on a galaxy-spanning mission to find the perpetrators…but has to decide what lengths he will go to in order to save one life!

TEEN TITANS GIANT #1

In this original six-part Teen Titans story by Dan Jurgens with art by Scot Eaton, Wayne Faucher, and Jim Charalampidis, the Teen Titans’ pizza dinner is interrupted by the introduction of a new villain, the Disruptor. Teaming up with the Fearsome Five and working as an agent of H.I.V.E., he had one mission: kill the Teen Titans! The battle spills onto the streets of San Francisco, putting its citizens at risk, while H.I.V.E. uses this distraction to begin their plan for world conquest!

Additional issue #1 stories include:

SUPER SONS #1 (2017) – From DC’s smash-hit Rebirth event, writer Peter J. Tomasi and artist Jorge Jimenez reintroduce the sons of Superman and Batman, Jonathan Kent and Damian Wayne, in part one of “When I Grow Up.” As Robin, Damian’s more than ready to take his place at the heroes’ table and has zero plans to wait his turn. And he’s dragging Superman’s son along for the trip, whether Jon likes it or not!

SIDEWAYS #1 (2018) – Also from the New Age of Heroes, this story written by Dan DiDio with art by Kenneth Rocafort introduces fans to high schooler Derek James who, during the events of DARK NIGHTS: METAL, has acquired powers from the Dark Multiverse and stepped into the role of superhero! But when cracks begin to appear in the space-time continuum, he soon learns that with that much power comes even greater liability!

TEEN TITANS #1 (2003) – Written by best-selling author Geoff Johns with art by Mike McKone. Cyborg, Raven, Starfire and Beast Boy welcome in a new roster of young heroes to train to defend humanity—Wonder Girl, Impulse and a Superboy who’s been cloned from Superman’s DNA!

BATMAN GIANT #1

Batman is on the case of a missing girl in “One More Chance,” an all-new story by writer Jimmy Palmiotti and artist Patrick “Patch” Zircher. Batman is the world’s greatest detective, but what happens when the trail in his newest case leads him back to a place from his past that he never expected to revisit?

BATMAN GIANT #1 also includes:

BATMAN #608 (2002) – Written by Jeph Loeb with art by comics icon Jim Lee, issue #608 kicks off “Batman: Hush,” one of the most popular storylines in the Dark Knight’s fabled history. When Batman sets out to unmask the mystery character wreaking havoc in his life, he teams up with an unexpected ally (Catwoman) and finds himself facing off against not only his deadliest foes, but some of the toughest characters in the DC Universe, including Poison Ivy, Killer Croc and even Superman!

NIGHTWING #1 (2011) – From DC’s New 52, this story by writer Kyle Higgins and artist Eddy Barrows debuted a new look for Dick Grayson as he dives into a tale of murder, mystery and superhuman evil against the backdrop of Haley’s Circus, the place that started him on his path from acrobat to orphan to sidekick and ultimately superhero!

HARLEY QUINN #1 (2011) – Also from the New 52, writer Jimmy Palmiotti and artist Amanda Conner break Harley Quinn out of The Joker’s shadow with all the force of a giant mallet!

Beginning with BATMAN GIANT #3 in September, superstar writer Brian Michael Bendis makes his DC debut on the Dark Knight with a 12-part story, “Universe.” Batman’s run-in with the Riddler leads the Caped Crusader into a mystery that spans the globe!

JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA GIANT #1

Justice League member Wonder Woman is spotlighted in “The Conversion,” an all-new story from NIGHTWING writer Tim Seeley and artists Rick Leonardi and Steve Buccellato. In this single-issue story, Wonder Woman comes face to face with Ares, god of war—who sees her as a promising new recruit!

JUSTICE LEAGUE GIANT #1 also includes:

JUSTICE LEAGUE #1 (2011) – From the incomparable team of writer Geoff Johns and artist Jim Lee comes this version of the League from the New 52. In this alternative spin on the union of Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, the Flash, Aquaman and Cyborg, superheroes are a strange and new phenomenon. The mysterious Batman discovers a dark evil that requires him to unite these reluctant heroes to protect Earth from a cosmic-level threat!

THE FLASH #1 (2011) – In this New 52 version of the Fastest Man Alive, writer Brian Buccellato and artist Francis Manapul introduce Barry Allen to a villain who not only can be everywhere at once, but is also a close friend of the Scarlet Speedster!

AQUAMAN #1 (2011) – Award-winning writer Geoff Johns and dynamic artist Ivan Reis team up on this story from the New 52! Aquaman has given up the throne of Atlantis, but the sea still has plans for Arthur Curry as a broken race of undersea creatures, the Trench, emerges from the ocean depths, bent on destroying the surface world!

In issue #2, Seeley teams up with artists Felipe Watanabe and Chris Sotomayor on “Mother’s Day,” a stand-alone story where Wonder Woman returns to Paradise Island for the first time since her exile, only to find that the Amazons – and Queen Hippolyta – have been abducted by Echidna, the mythological Mother of Monsters, with a brood of unstoppable beasts as children!

Issue #3 begins another original 12-part Wonder Woman story by HARLEY QUINN co-writers Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti called “Come Back to Me.” When Steve Trevor’s plane crashes on an island outside of time itself, it’s up to Wonder Woman to rescue him from this mysterious land, full of monsters, dinosaurs and some very surprising citizens.

DC Rebirth Roundup: Comics From The 16th and 23rd of May

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth Roundup where we take a look at most of the comics released by DC and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in assuming we’ve read said series.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up with only a basic familiarity with the characters.  You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, so you’ll have an idea if the comic is any good or not (remember quality and accessibility don’t always go together).

Not every comic is covered released will be covered, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue (which is more likely).  Typically comics released prior to the weeks covered won’t be featured.


 

AQM_Cv36A shorter entry than is typical this week, as I had less time than usual to read comics… c’est la vie.

Aquaman #36 Arthur Curry was usurped as King of Atlantis  by Coram Rath, who over the course of a dozen issues or so has gone insane… guess who’s going to try and stop him? The comic is kind of  Friendly, and an excellent continuation of the series. Rating 7.8

Batman #47 Finally the conclusion of the Booster Gold gives Batman a wedding present is here. It’s… neither worth reading nor is it a good jumping on point. Unfriendly. Rating: 5

The Flash #47 You’ll find the first issue of a new arc if you pick this comic up,  and despite the build toward Flash War over the past couple months, this is still a relatively Friendly issue. Rating: 7

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Crops #45  There’s a war brewing between the Green Lanterns and the Darkstars, a group of space vigilantes who believe in a lethal justice solution for murderers – something that the Green Lantern Corps isn’t too happy with. Consequently there’s a tension building, and this Friendly issue will catch you up and set the stage for you going forward. Rating: 8

New Challengers #1 Funnily enough, a first issue is a decent jumping on point. It’s also quite an interesting comic to pick up, and consequently worth your time. Rating: 7

Superman Special #1  It’s Friendly. Rating: 7.5

DC Rebirth Roundup: Comics From The 25th of April and 2nd of May

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth Roundup where we take a look at most of the comics released by DC and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in assuming we’ve read said series.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up with only a basic familiarity with the characters.  You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, so you’ll have an idea if the comic is any good or not (remember quality and accessibility don’t always go together).

Typically only select comics released in the featured weeks will be covered.


 

GA_Cv40Batman #46 Booster Gold decided to show Batman what life would be like if his parents lived, and Bruce Wayne decided he liked it and destroyed the time machine. Dick Grayson is a one word Batman with a penchant for murder, and the world doesn’t get better beyond that. Nor does the comic. An unfriendly 6/10

Green Arrow #40 A solid conclusion to an arc that found Green Arrow in the middle of a war torn country being taken over by a supervillain who just shot our hero in the gut. This isn’t terribly Friendly, but it is still accessible. 7/10

Hal Joran And The Green Lantern Corps #44 There’s a war coming (you’ll sense a theme with that), and the Green Lanterns are consolidating power. A Friendly 8/10

Nightwing #44 Part one of a new arc, so the question is can you pick it up with out any prior knowledge? Kinda. I mean, it’s Friendly enough, but it’s not the best read out there. 5/10

The Flash #46 ….. yeah, it’s not bad. But it’s honestly just a set up issue for the upcoming Flash War, so it is technically Friendly. 5/10

Wonder Woman #46 A relatively easy jumping on point, providing you know who Wonder Woman is. You may not know about her brother, Jason, but that’s not a huge deal. Friendly, and not half bad. 7/10

DC Rebirth Roundup: Comics From The 11th and 18th of April

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth Roundup where we take a look at most of the comics released by DC and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in assuming we’ve read said series.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up with only a basic familiarity with the characters.  You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, so you’ll have an idea if the comic is any good or not (remember quality and accessibility don’t always go together).

Not every comic is covered released will be covered, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue (which is more likely).  Typically comics released prior to the weeks covered won’t be featured.


 

Action Comics #1000 So here it is. A thousand issues of Action Comics. The first AC_Cv1000_var1980superhero comic to crack four digits; because of the historical significance you’re probably going to buy this anyway, aren’t you?

Aquaman #35 Aquaman lost his throne and is now part of a civil war aimed at removing his successor. An Unfriendly comic, but one well worth reading if you’ve gotten this far in the series. 7.2/10

Batman #45 Effectively a new jumping on point, this Friendly comic won’t feel that way at first, but bear with it, as Tom King stays above he mediocrity that has been plaguing his run and delivers an interesting take on the world if Bruce Wayne never became Batman. 7/10

Detective Comics #978 Uh… you know what I have no idea where to start. 6.5/10

The Flash #44 There’s a negative speed force storm destroying Central City, the Flash is fighting Gorilla Grodd and the other Flashes are evacuating the city. This isn’t too bad an issue, indeed it’s a step above the last few, and it’s oddly Friendly for a finale. 7/10

Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps #42 The start of a new arc that will see space cops (Green Lanters) verses space vigilantes. Friendly and fun. 7/10

Justice League #43 The finale of an incredible arc isn’t typically the best place to start. This Unfriendly issue is no exception. 7.9/10

NTW_Cv43Nightwing #43 Friendly team up issue with Arsenal and Robin. Get your popcorn out and enjoy! 8/10

Red Hood and the Outlaws #21 Bizarro has become addicted to liquid Kryptonite in order to preserve his incredible intellect that has allowed the Outlaws to radically depreciate crime in Gotham. The issue is Friendly enough, and worth a look. 7.3/10

Super Sons #15 Not an unFriendly issue as far as things go, but it will be tough to muscle past the sudden introduction of a character from early in the series. You get only a little back story, and it’s just enough. 7/10

 

DC Rebirth Roundup: April 4th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth Roundup where we take a look at most of the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

SM_Cv44Batman #44 Honestly all you need to know to make this Friendly is that Batman and Catwoman are getting married soon. 8/10. 

Cyborg #21 Part one of a new arc that has lots of big robots and mech fighting and… well the art is solid enough. This is essentially a Friendly comic, but it isn’t great. 5/10

Green Arrow #39 A new arc, and aside from a single line referring to a trial (it was Oliver Queen on trial for a murder he didn’t commit – spoiler he was acquitted) this is an entirely Friendly comic. 7/10

Green Lanterns #44 Another comic with a new arc beginning, and once again it’s a Friendly one. More or less. And I say that having forgotten the history between the Lanterns and the returning character. 7/10

Nightwing #42 Friendly one shot that puts Nightwing into a martial arts film. There’s nothing to recap, honestly, and as long as you just want entertainment this is fun. 7.5/10

Superman #44 Superman and Superboy are on Bizarro World, along with a few others. If you can muddle through the reverse speaking of the Bizarros then you’ll enjoy this Friendlyish issue. 6.7/10

 

DC Rebirth Roundup: March 28th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth Roundup where we take a look at most of the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

DTC_Cv977Detective Comics #977 The team Batman had assembled to fight crime in Gotham has imploded, with Batwoman, Batwing and Azreal signing up with the Colony – a paramilitary group modeled off Batman. Last issue Tim Drake was approached by the former colony operative responsible for weapons development who wanted to prevent a dark future… As far as thing goes this is a Friendly issue, and one that provides an interesting snapshot into a possible future for Gotham. 7.5/10

The Flash #43 Slightly better than last issue, but this still isn’t great. To recap: Grodd stole the Speedforce from Barry, the Flash family stepped up to save the day, but Barry was a selfish jerk tried to steal back his powers because he didn’t trust anybody else to save the day. Upon getting his powers back, for reasons best attributed to shitty writing, Grodd had control of the Flash family through the Speedforce. While this is Friendly, it’s not something I’d recommend you reading. 5/10

Hal Jordan & The Green Lantern Corps #41 Kyle Raynor and Hal Jordan were attacked and captured while checking out a planet that happened to be General Zod’s new home. After a bit of a scrap as the rest of the Corps came to free them, we’re left with Hal Jordan verses General Zod. A Friendly issue that’s basically all a green brawl. It’s awesome. 8/10

HLB_Cv20The Hellblazer #20 It has been far too long since I read a Hellblazer comic, so there’s no recap, but this comic is still Friendly enough and enjoyable enough for new readers to jump in with no issues. 8/10

Justice League Of America #27 It’s a part one, he says. Should be Friendly, he says. It’s not. It’s an Unfriendly opening to a story that does little to draw me in. 6/10

Teen Titans #18 When Beast Boy left the Teen Titans and hooked up with a game company, the rest of the team stopped a bus from crashing into the river – driven by an otherwise great kid. Suspecting foul play, Robin found a doowhatsit in the kid’s brain, and guess which game company was responsible? Friendly and worth a read. 8/10

Suicide Squad #38 Part one of a new arc that finds the Squad being superseded by a one man wrecking ball – the super soldier code named The Wall. The rest of the background is relatively irrelevant as you’re brought up to speed on what you need to know as it happens; the comic is Friendly and entertaining. 7/10

Wonder Woman #43 An average comic at best which is Friendly in its simplicity. 6/10

 

DC Rebirth Roundup: March 21st’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


AQM_Cv34*please note that due to a wonderful error, I lost the first version I wrote this. That said, this is far briefer than normal, and you have my apologies for that as I barely remember the comics at this point.

Aquaman #34 A look at the history of King Rath. It’s an interesting and Friendly look into Aquaman’s current enemy. 7/10

Batman #43 Wait till next issue. Please. Unfriendly3/10

Green Lanterns #43 The Unfriendly-ish conclusion to an arc that had the space cops crossing the galaxy undercover in pursuit of superhuman slave traders. Not bad, as things go, but the series has been better. 5/10

Justice League #41 The Watchtower crashed to Earth, and people want its parts. Despite how it feels, this is Friendly. 

Nightwing #41 An immortal manipulator is responsible for 30-odd deaths in three meetings with Nightwing, and the former boy wonder blames himself. Now, in this Friendly conclusion, we see Nightwing try to do the impossible to stop The Judge. 7.2/10

Super Sons #14 Robin’s mother, Talia Al Ghul, is trying to murder Lois Lane. Guess who’s gotta stop her? Yeah. Enjoy this Friendly romp through comic greatness. 8/10

Superman #43 Super Boy accidentally on purpose visited Bizarro world. Now, Boyzarro has appeared in his bedroom. 7.5/10

DC Rebirth Roundup: March 7th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

HJGLC_Cv40Action Comics #999 Almost a filler story until the huge milestone coming up, but it’s not completely worthless as it ties up a few loose ends and resets Lois’ relationship with her father. Friendly enough at the end of the day, but I’d hold out till next issue at this point. 6/10

Detective Comics #976 Batwoman killed Clayface to save the lives of innocent people and subsequently joined The Colony as the fallout of her actions rippled through the Bat Family. This issue picks up with a new arc that’s still leaning heavily on past issues but is Friendly nonetheless. 7/10

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #40 Hal and Kyle Raynor were sent to investigate a planet for a relatively unrelated reason only to find that Zod and his family had conquered it. They fought the Kryptonians, lost, and were captured. Their rings were removed for study. Hal’s ring, being made from his own will, broke confinement andHal made Kyle use it to escape and get reinforcements (who left on an unscheduled and unsanctioned rescue mission). Prepare yourself for the might of Krypton and a lot of Green in this Friendly action packed issue. 8/10

New Super-Man And The Justice League Of China #21 The JLC have come face to face with a young man escaping from North Korea on the back of giant freaking crabs. It’s awesome (and Friendly). 7.5/10

Red Hood And The Outlaws #20 Bizarro is using some kind of green stuff to remain super intelligent, and the Outlaws are beginning to suspect that the genius who has helped them eliminate crime is keeping a secret… 7/10 (Yeah, since you asked, TNS_Cv21it’s Friendly).

Suicide Squad #36 I missed the last issue, I think, but this one is still relatively Friendly6.75/10

The Flash #42 Uh…. dear lord this is a pile of turd. I really don’t want you to read this because it’s awful, but if you must…. Grodd has stolen Barry Allen’s powers and he’s believes that nobody but him can save the day despite there being three other Flashes in the area. The are is sub par as well. 2/10

Titans #21 I may have forgotten most of last issue, but Roy Harper was given drugs (he wasn’t aware of it until afterwards), and is trying to save the world but isn’t having much luck with people believing him. This issue is kinda Friendly, and has a really cool fight scene. 7.25/10

Wonder Woman #42 I’d give you a recap, but the series has taken a turn for the worse, and I either didn’t read the last issue or I don’t remember it. Either way, this is kinda Friendly, but quite miss-able. 5/10

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