Tag Archives: green lantern

DC Rebirth: Recap And Review

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

aqm_cv15_dsAquaman #15 The conclusion to The Deluge is actually relatively Friendly without a recap.

Batman #15 Catwoman may or may not have murdered a couple hundred people. Batman gave her one last night of freedom in Gotham before he takes her to prison in the morning. After stopping a few crimes, and having a chat, they end up naked on a roof together… This could be a Friendly comic with that recap, but I don’t know if it’s worth your time.

Green Arrow #15 Ollie has been framed for numerous murders by the Dark Archer. He also beat the snot out of a crooked cop who was assaulting a civilian a few issues ago. That’s more or less enough to get you into the visually amazing Friendly comic.

Green Lanterns #15 Is actually an incredibly Friendly issue. We focus on Jessica Cruz’s greatest battle, and it’s a comic that gives us quite an insight into her character.

Justice League Vs. The Suicide Squad # 5 (of six) As you may imagine, this issue sees the story rocketing toward the conclusion of the arc, so what do you need to know to not feel lose? Well, Max Lord – a villain who can influence your darkest desires, who has a misguided sense of eroism – has taken control of the Justice League minus Batman via some kind of mind controlling diamond, and that’s… pretty much it. I’d still recommend you read the series as a whole rather than starting here, but it’s Friendly enough, I suppose.

Nightwing #13 Having just arrived in Bludhaven for the first time post Rebirth in order to find himself again, Nightwing comes across a supervillain support group who are being gradually framed for murder. The Bludhaven PD aren’t thrilled with having a superhero ntw_cv13_dstake up residence in their city, either… this Friendly book has become one of the best Bat family books from DC in recent months.

Superman #15 Last issue had a lot of build up that can basically be boiled down to the following: someone is hunting Supermen across the multiverse, and our Superman has teamed with President Superman and some others to stop them. This is a Friendly, and enjoyable, story.

Superwoman #6 Lois Lane and Lana Lang were both Superwoman until Lois was killed in issue #1. Since then, Lex Luthor has been locked up by his sister (no, we didn’t know he had one either), who has become Ultra-Woman – essentially a very comic book villain version of Lex Luthor who is trying to do something nefarious. The comic is kinda  Friendly.

Trinity #5 Uh… I don’t actually remember too much about the last four issues, but the relevant parts are skimmed over enough in the comic that I wasn’t lost. It’s Friendly enough, I suppose, although  you may want to track down #4.

Mighty Meeples: DC Justice League Collection Tin, Out Now!

Cryptozoic Entertainment has released the Mighty Meeples: DC Justice League Collection Tin. The tin resembles the Hall of Justice, the iconic home of the Justice League, and provides a stylish home for the seven included Mighty Meeples figures, all depicting members of DC’s Justice League. The 1-inch wooden figures can be collected for display or can replace pieces in any board game to upgrade the experience.

First appearing over 15 years ago, the “meeple”—short for “my people”—possesses a distinctive shape that has made it a popular choice for player pieces in a variety of games. Cryptozoic increases the fun with Mighty Meeples that are oversized (regular meeples are usually .75 inches) and showcase popular DC Justice League heroes Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Green Lantern, Aquaman, and Martian Manhunter.

The Mighty Meeples: DC Justice League Collection Tin retails for $14.99. Fans of DC’s Justice League can show off the Hall of Justice tin and use it to store the included Mighty Meeples figures, which can be collected or used in board games. Starting this week, the tin will be available at hobby retailers nationwide.

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Only a Few Days More for Comic Block Featuring Deadpool, Ninjak, Star Trek, Green Lantern, and More!

There just a few more days left for December’s Comic Block which features exclusive items from Deadpool, Ninjak, Star Trek, Green Lantern, and more. It also has variant covers from Paul McCaffrey, Mike McKone, and Angel Hernandez!

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This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: Justice League Batman Pin Mate

Hot off the truck! New classic Justice League Pin Mate figures are here just in time to save the holidays. Sold individually, these retro-styled, miniature wooden figures are numbered 17-23 in the series and include Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, The Flash, Aquaman, Cyborg and more! Collect them all!

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This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Rebirth Review: Comics Released on 11/16

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

This week saw a lot of good comics that may not be as accessible as other issues in their respective series, but that’s often par for the course, eh?


aqm_cv11_dsAquaman #11 Thanks in a large part to the flashback sequences in the opening couple of pages, and the expositionary dialogue as the comic progresses, this is a quite Friendly comic that ties up one arc and lays the ground work for the next. The level of accessibility here isn’t something you’re likely to see in a story arc at this point in it’s cycle, which is refreshing.

Batman #11  I’ve read every issue of the series so far and this feels Unfriendly to me. New readers will struggle immensely  if they start here, not least because the issue isn’t all that good.

Cyborg #5 I feel like this is one of DC’s  monthly titles because it feel like a long time since I last read an issue, and I’ve been looking forward to getting my hands on a copy for what feels like awhile. The first half of this comic is very Friendly, and worth the price of the comic alone. The second half… is less friendly, but just as interesting.

Green Arrow #11 Is a beautiful looking comic that uses the double page spread to excellent effect, but it’s not overly accessible for those looking to start reading about the Emerald Archer. Unfriendly, but check back with #12.

gls_cv11_dsGreen Lanterns #11 After ten issues it was bound to happen, but this is the most Unfriendly comic in the Green Lanterns series to date. If you’ve read the last issue or two then you’ll be golden, but starting here may not be as good of an idea. That said, it’s a great read.

Justice League #9 Alright, so here’s the thing. The only way you’ll ever be able to pick up an issue of Justice League is if you have some level of familiarity with the characters on the team. Assuming you do, then you’ll be able to pick up enough clues as to what happened last issue to be able to follow along with the story here. More or less, anyway. A Friendly comic, assuming you’ve half an idea who the members of the League are.

Nightwing #9 A half decent comic that’s an easy read, not too bad to look at, but isn’t all that friendly, or good. You’re better off either waiting for the next issue and reading a synopsis somewhere, or just waiting for the next issue. An Unfriendly place to begin your Nightwing journey.

Raven #3 I find that this is the series that I’ve had the hardest time getting immersed in, and a consequence of that is that I tend to forget the details from the previous issue – ironically enough that’s kind of ideal for this feature. That said, despite not really knowing, or remembering much about Raven, I found this comic surprisingly Friendly, ssquad_cv6_dseven if it isn’t my cup of tea (although I did enjoy it a fair bit).

Suicide Squad #6 There’s two ways of approaching this issue. Either you have no idea who the Suicide Squad is, in which case you’ll be confused as hell here, or you kinda know who they are, which means you’ll be only marginally confused – but  you’ll at least find this to be almost Friendly.

Superman #11 This is the kind of comic that you want to start reading with. It’s not perfect in it’s accessibility (it is part two of a two part story, after all), but it’s more than Friendly  enough to draw new readers into the series. I highly recommend you read this, and maybe even the issue before, as this is one of the better series from DC post Rebirth.

Trinity #3 A fantastic comic that builds on the previous two issues in such a way that leaves new readers scratching their heads. That said, there is a very interesting look into Batman’s psyche and the relationship between DC’s Trinity, but if you’re interested in the series then start with the first issue.

Rebirth Review: Comics Released 11/9

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

This week saw a lot of good comics that may not be as accessible as other issues in their respective series, but that’s often par for the course, eh?



ac_cv967_dsAction Comics #967 Well, whether you’ve read previous issues or not, you can certainly pick this one up and enjoy it. Will you be able to figure everything out? Maybe, maybe not. But you’ll have fun reading this issue, and ultimately that’s the whole point of a comic, right? For that reason, it’s Friendly.

All-Star Batman #4 The best, and most expensive, Batman book is also perhaps the most Unfriendly. If you haven’t been reading since issue #1, you’ll be as confused as your average North American at a cricket match (and most English people too, to be honest), but if you have then you’ll probably be as happy as a pig in muck with this issue.

Batgirl And The Birds Of Prey #4 By focusing more on Huntress, the comic allows new readers to get a foot in the door relatively easily. Not only is this better than the last issue, it’s Friendly to boot, thanks largely to the comic’s plot centering around Huntress’ motivations and not Batgirl or Black Canary’s – thankfully you can figure out where the two meet and enjoy the comic without any hassle whatsoever.

Deathstroke #6 As I’m reading this comic, I’m reminded again of an earlier thought that this would be so much better read in trade. Issue #6 may be Unfriendly, but it’s enjoyable nonetheless.

Detective Comics #944 Much like the other Batman book this week, this is an Unfriendly comic, but unlike All-Star it’s not quite a good.

Gotham Academy: Second Semester #3 A quality book that, being the conclusion to a story, isn’t overly friendly. If the series interests you, then wait for issue #4 – it looks like there’s a new arc beginning then which will be a bit more accessible.

hjglc_cv8_dsHal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps #8 is the start of a new story arc for the series, but the consequences of the previous issues have a strong bearing on the beginning of said story, making this just a tad bit Unfriendly as a jumping on point. Still, if you’re looking for a good read, pick up the first trade when it hits shelves, then come back here.

New Super-Man #4 Another fantastic comic from DC this week that you’ll need a little familiarity with to get the most out of it. Despite that, however, it’s still Friendly enough because even though you may not know exactly what’s happening or why you never feel horribly lost, either.

Red Hood And The Outlaws #4 This is a comic that just boarders on the Friendly side purely because of Red Hood’s opening narration. If it wasn’t for that this wouldn’t be an ideal jumping on point, despite the quality of the issue, as very little is spelled out for you – although one could argue that is a good thing.

Supergirl #3 You’re able to get the gist of what’s going on here, and who certain characters are early in the comic, but it’s never quite enough to fully ring you into the loop – but it does mean that this is a Friendly comic. But only just.

Superwoman #4 There’s a nice amount of subtle, and not so subtle, narration and dialogue ww_cv10_dsthat will allow you to get up to speed with the series before things hit the fan mid way through, making this a Friendly issue in the series.

The Flash #10 Starts a new arc by telling a seemingly unrelated story on the first page (but this is comics – it’s bound to be relevant at some point) before telling a more Kid Flash centered story. It’s Friendly, more so than any other issue in the series so far to be completely honest as there isn’t any significant references to previous issues – or other series.

Wonder Woman #10 The origin of Wonder Woman continues to be told in alternating issues, and so long as you’re aware that this comic takes place very soon after Wonder Woman’s arrival to our world then you’ll find this fantastic issue to be very Friendly, as for all intents and purposes it could almost be a stand alone story.

 

Rebirth Review: Comics Released 11/2

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

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Aquaman #10 An issue that focuses on prophecy is fairly Friendly, all things said and done. Aquaman #10 focuses on Mera, and by doing that it allows new readers to get their bearings on the current situation enough to follow the story to the next issue.

Batman #10 Is a fairly Unfriendly comic if I’m being honest. It looks great, but it’s not too accessible.

Cyborg #4 As far as jumping on points go, this isn’t ideal. I wouldn’t go so far as to say it’s either friendly or unfriendly, because I feel it’s right in the middle. As a conclusion, however, it’s great.

Green Arrow #10 The start of a new arc is usually a good place to start reading,  and so long as you don’t worry too much about what the heroes are trying to do on an underground bullet train, you’ll find the Friendly.

Green Lanterns #10 Another week, another Friendly issue of Green Lanterns. Despite being the first issue in a new arc, this isn’t as accessible as previous issues, but it’s still very gls_cv10_dsmuch a good jumping on point for new readers.

Harley Quinn #7 There’s a decent bit of recaping narration at the beginning that lends this a much more Friendly feel than previous issues, despite it being part three.

Justice League #8 This issue has the start of a new arc, and despite having a bit of reference to previous story events, it’s Friendly enough for new readers.

Midnighter And Apollo #2 Picking up right where the last issue left off, this is a very Unfriendly comic – so much so I had to go back and re-read the first issue. But for all that, its very much worth reading both issues; this is a great series, but being a six issue mini, it’s unlikely to have another jumping on point.

Nightwing #8 Having reading previous issues will help tremendously, especially the last issue. As a starting point… it’s just about Friendly on it’s own, but only just.

Superman #10 Anytime Robin gets to interact with the other DC heroes is always entertaining, and this issue is no exception. Luckily, it’s also a pretty Friendly comic.

The Working Families Party’s Brightest Day, Goes Superhero in Email Blast

Politicians and political parties invoking superheroes isn’t anything new. Candidates have done it. Organizations have done it. The Working Families Party sent out an email yesterday with a superhero theme and directly quoting the Green Lantern oath with a twist.

Founded in New York in 1998, the Working Families Party is a political party in the US mainly focused on “jobs, healthcare, raising the minimum wage, universal paid sick days, the student debt crisis, higher taxes on the rich, public education, and energy and environmental reform.”

In the fundraising pitch, the email is a solid one with a focus on individuals at the local level who have helped to make a difference and are now running for office.

You can read the full email below.

In dark Trump times like these, it’s hard to find the glimmer of hope. But wait — look there, Amanda! In hometowns all across the country — Philadelphia, Las Vegas, Salem, Albuquerque, Snoqualmie and more — people are standing up to serve their community.

It’s the Working Families Party Superheroes!

They are taking on the likes of Donald Trump, the NRA, fossil fuel lobbyists, and wealthy donors — without the resources you see in the presidential campaigns.

Meet our WFP Superheroes and then chip in $3 to help WFP turn out the votes they need to win!


WFP Superheroes, from left to right, top row to bottom…

Teresa Alonso Leon runs Oregon’s GED program, helping low-income and working class families fight for a better life. Meanwhile, multinational corporations and wealthy donors refuse to pay their fair share. Now she’s had enough and is running for Oregon State House on a platform of women’s economic equality, public education, and protecting seniors.

Philadelphia’s Chris Rabb is an author, activist and college professor. After he helped over 100 adjunct professors unionize for living wages, he was abruptly “uninvited” to continue teaching. Now he’s running for PA State Assembly to bring the fight for school funding to Harrisburg!

New Mexico’s narrow Republican majority has been passing legislation that benefits big energy companies and ignores public school children. So long-time teacher, mentor and elderly services volunteer, Natalie Figueroa, is running to challenge the Republican Majority Leader and tip the scales in favor of progressive values.

In Las Vegas, middle school teacher Brittney Miller knew that energy sustainability and public school funding couldn’t wait another semester. So she decided to step up and run for State Assembly against a wealthy lawyer who supports tax policies that will help the rich — and leave the rest of us behind.

A family tragedy opened Jason Ritchie’s eyes to the needs of differently-abled residents in Washington state. Now, this Bernie-endorsed candidate wants to fight for working families in the State House. He’s challenging a Trump-like incumbent who opposes women’s reproductive rights, family leave, and raising the minimum wage.

Any one of these WFP Superheroes could be a future Bernie Sanders — but they have to win their elections! WFP is throwing down for down-ballot superheroes leading up to November. You can help elect a new generation of progressive champions all over the country by chipping in $3. Click here to help WFP forge a new future with local progressive superheroes.

POW! Let’s do this!

Amanda Johnson
Working Families Party

Rebirth Review: Comics Released 10/12

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

ac_cv965_dsAction Comics #965 This Friendly once you accept that the two people at the center of the book, Clark and Lois, aren’t from this world. They’re the same characters from before the New 52, but due to circumstances beyond their control, they’ve got to step into the lives of their now disappeared counter parts (Superman and Lois Lane – there’s already a Clark Kent). It’s an interesting concept, and a story focusing on Lois shows a less super side to their lives.

All-Star Batman #3 is very good,but completely Unfriendly to new readers. If you’ve been reading the series so far, however, you’ll be fine.

Batgirl and the Birds Of Prey #3 This really isn’t a bad comic, provided that you’re at least partly familiar with the previous events – specifically why there’s a Oracle and a Batgirl, because that crucial detail is missing this issue, which ales this decidedly Unfriendly.

Deathstroke #4 I have a feeling that this story will be far better read as a trade, but even if you were to start here, you’ll find it Friendly enough.

hjglc_cv5_open_order_varDetective Comics #942 The finale of a multi-part, multi-comic crossover that ends strongly, but it’s an Unfriendly place for new readers

Gotham Academy: Second Semester #2 Having no idea what this series is about, the second issue was actually a lot more Friendly than the first for me. An entertaining comic that focuses on several students at a Gotham boarding house who’ve set up a detective club – think in a similar vein to Scooby Doo. I didn’t expect to like this.

Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps #6 There’s two ways to look at this comic, an depending on how you approach it will approach it’s accessibility. If you just want to read a story about Hal Jordan being awesome and kicking ass, then this is the place to be; but if you want to know why he’s kicking ass beyond the fact he has to stop the Yellow Lanterns, you’re a little out of luck. I’m not giving this a rating for that reason.

New Super-Man #4 You can jump on board here and be able to have a half-decent Friendly comic, just about, but it’ll be so much better if you start at least an issue ago.

nsm_cv4_dsRed Hood And The Outlaws #3 Is actually more Friendly than the last issue. There are moments that may not make sense, but by and large… you can jump right in here and enjoy the story.

Suicide Squad #4 Is a chaotic mess that somehow still explains just about what you need to make the fourth issue Friendly. That Suicide Squad #4 is also hugely entertaining in a popcorn action flick kinda way is a pleasant bonus.

Supergirl #2 Another comic this week that falls right in the middle of the Friendly/Unfriendly line. There are aspects that welcome newer readers, and just as many that will cause confusion. We’re only two issues in, so if you’re even a little curious about Supergirl, pick both issues up.

Superwoman #3 The advantage to reading as many of the DC comics as I do for this feature means that I tend to forget what happened in previous issues. Rather than going back and rereading them to catch myself up, I use my poor memory to judge  how accessible the comics are. Unfortunately, in cases such as this fls_cv8_dswith Superwoman I don’t recall too much of the previous issues, making this comic a tad Unfriendly.

The Flash #8 Although this wraps up the current Gospeed focused arc, there’s actually a decent amount of the comic that’s Friendly to new readers, and the set up for the next tale is also well done. You could do much worse than starting here with the series.

Wonder Woman #8 An interlude into the current stories that delves a little into the past of Dr. Minerva. It’s an interesting foray into the past, but not the most Friendly place to start (that’s not an unfriendly rating, but rather a friendly comic that doesn’t feature Wonder Woman at all).

 

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: Dorbz: DC

New DC Dorbz are coming! Green Lantern Batman, Green Lantern, The Flash, and Sinestro!

Be on the lookout for the limited chase editions: White Lantern Batman and White Lantern Flash from the battle with Black Lantern Corps, and glow-in-the-dark Green Lantern!

Check out a special Blue Flash and its glow-in-the-dark chase, only at GameStop!

Each chase has a 1 in 6 rarity! They’ll be in shops this November.

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