Tag Archives: wonder woman

Trump’s Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin Helped produce X-Men, Batman v Superman, Suicide Squad, and more.

trumpOur first reality television President sure seems to be tapping into his Hollywood connections when it comes to asking opinions on what he should do as well as his nominees for different roles. It is being reported that President-elect Donald Trump has tapped Steven Mnuchin to be his Treasury secretary. You might be asking why we’re reporting on this, but Mnuchin is more than a former partner at Goldman Sachs, his career is actually relevant to this site!

Founded in 2006 Dune Entertainment was a movie financing company started by Mnuchin. The company helped co-finance 20th Century Fox, Fox Searchlight Pictures, and Fox 2000 Films such as X-Men: The Last Stand (which was a co-production with Marvel Entertainment and The Donners’ Company), Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (a co-production with Marvel Studios, Constantin Film and 1492 Pictures), Alien vs. Predator: Requiem, The X-Files: I Want to Believe, X-Men Origins: Wolverine (a co-production with Marvel Entertainment, The Donners’ Company, and Seed), Avatar, Predators, X-Men: First Class (a co-production with Marvel Entertainment, The Donners’ Company, and Bad Hat Harry), Rise of the Planet of the Apes, Prometheus, and dozens of more films.

Marvel is mentioned because Marvel’s CEO Ike Perlmutter is buddy buddy with Trump.

RatPac Entertainment (aka RatPac-Dune Entertainment) was a movie production and financing company formed in a merger by producer-director Brett Ratner, James Packer, and Dune Entertainment’s Mnuchin after a collapse in a negotiation between Dune and 20th Century Fox. That company then closed a deal with Warner Bros. to become their key co-financing partner replacing Legendary Pictures.

That new venture helped produce such films as Gravity, The Lego Movie, Godzilla, Edge of Tomorrow, Mad Max: Fury Road, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (co-production with DC Entertainment, Cruel and Unusual Films and Atlas Entertainment), The Legend of Tarzan (co-production with Village Roadshow Pictures, Jerry Weintraub Productions, and Dark Horse Entertainment), Suicide Squad (co-production with DC Entertainment and Atlas Entertainment), The Lego Batman Movie (co-production with Warner Animation Group and DC Entertainment), Wonder Woman (co-production with DC Entertainment, Atlas Entertainment and Cruel and Unusual Films), Justice League (co-production with DC Films, Atlas Entertainment and Cruel and Unusual Films), The Flash (co-production with DC Films), Aquaman (o-production with DC Films and Cruel and Unusual Films), The Lego Movie Sequel, Shazam (co-production with DC Films and New Line Cinema), Cyborg (co-production with DC Films), Green Lantern Corps (co-production with DC Films), and the Justice League sequel (co-production with DC Films and Cruel and Unusual Films).

There’s also the upcoming Assassin’s Creed movie… so, yeah. He even acted in Rules Don’t Apply where he was a “Merrill Lynch Executive.”

Mnuchin has worked with Marvel, DC, and Dark Horse, on some of the major comic films of the last decade and next five years. The guy even has an IMDB page.

So, when you nerd rage over how much upcoming geek films suck, you can turn your venom towards our possible next Treasury secretary.

Rebirth Review: DC Comics Released 11/23

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

This week saw a lot of good comics that may not be as accessible as other issues in their respective series, but that’s often par for the course, eh?


ac_cv968_open_order_varAction Comics #968 Aside from having a couple elements from previous issues being referred to here, this is actually a really good place to hop into one of DC’s better series. Is this an ideal starting point? Not really, but then unless you want EVERYTHING that’s happened before spelled out for you, this is as good a place to start as any because the comic more on the action, and isn’t bogged down by excessive plot details (there’s enough one line explanations in dialogue and narration to give you the gist of things). Friendly, and very much worth reading.

Batgirl #5 There’s a line in this comic that perfectly sums up the comic; “and I’m still not sure what happened…” Maybe the next issue will be a little more accessible. Unfriendly.

Batman Beyond #2 If you want to get into this series, and didn’t pick up the first issue, you’re better off starting there. The second issue does a lot more for the plot when read after the first (hey look, the sky’s blue!), but is a little too Unfriendly a place to start reading. If you’re not curious about the series itself, then I don’t suppose you’ll be interested in the story within a story of Batman’s last encounter with the Joker, eh?

Blue Beetle #3 This starts out confusing as hell, but I think that’s the point of the comic. After a few pages you’ll start to feel much more familiar with the characters (especially Jaime’s reluctance to wear the scarab), and aside from a few mentions of characters and event not present, or explained, in this issue, I’d say this is actually a blue_cv3_dspretty Friendly issue.

Deathstroke #7  As has been the case with almost every issue in this series aside from the first, this is an Unfriendly comic. That being said, I would highly recommend that if you’re curious about the character or the series that you wait for the trade – I have a feeling the story being told here will excel in collected format.

Detective Comics #945 This is another comic that has a little bit of expositionary dialogue at the very beginning of the comic that will probably feel a little forced in the inevitable trade, but works in the single issue format to turn the comic into a Friendly one, despite this being the third chapter of the story.

The Flash #11 may not be the best place to hop into the series, but this should be Friendly enough should you choose to do so here.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #9 While it isn’t explained why the Green Lantern Corps are working with a squad of Yellow Lanterns, nor why Hal is where he is, this is actually more than Friendly enough for you to dive in and start reading the series.

hjglc_cv9_dsHarley Quinn #8 To be completely and utterly honest, I am far from a fan of this series – but I do understand why others like it, it’s just not my cup of tea. That being said, however, as an almost standalone story this is going to be Friendly for those who are interested in the character; and it’s a story I actually enjoyed.

The Hellblazer #4 is one of those comics that I quite enjoyed, but had very little idea what was going on. The small bit of insight I did have was from reading the first issue (and maybe the second), so unless you’ve also done that you’ll likely find this to be an Unfriendly comic.

Teen Titans #2 Not only is this a Friendly comic, but it’s also fantastically entertaining. The story centers on Robin and his parental legacies as a device to pull the team back together after the “death” of Tim Drake, and much to my delight it’s working wonderfully.

Titans #5 For a comic that takes place in less than seven seconds, there’s a lot of story thrown at you, but it never feels overwhelming. Wally West’s narration recaps enough of what’s previously happened that you don’t feel too out of the loop – the speed of the story juxtaposed with the narration lends the story a brilliantly Friendly feel.

Sixpack & Dogwelder #4 This is far from being an accessible comic. Easily the most Unfriendly comic this week.

Wonder Woman #11 isn’t the best place to start reading the series, and yes it is Unfriendly, but it’s also going to really shine when a person has read the story in collected form, or regularly. Just don’t start here if you want to get the most from the story.

 

Preview: Wonder Woman #11

Wonder Woman #11

(W) Greg Rucka (A/CA) Liam Sharp
In Shops: Nov 23, 2016
SRP: $2.99

“THE LIES” part six! In the conclusion to this epic tale, the lie is revealed as Wonder Woman returns to Themyscira in the company of Steve Trevor to find that nothing has changed-and everything is wrong.

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Around the Tubes

bm66mww77_ch01-d_sfcoverIt’s turkey day here in the US so Happy Thanksgiving to all of you! For those in the rest of the world, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Kotaku – Even the Joker Can’t Save an Underwhelming Episode of Telltale’s Batman Game – Anyone playing this?

MIT Technology – AI Machine Attempts to Understand Comic Books … and Fails – A failure of the writing…

Chicago Tribune – Movie adaptation of graphic novel ‘The Empty Man’ to film in Chicago – Heads up Chicago readers.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Newsarama – Batman ’66 Meets Wonder Woman ’77 Chapter 1

Newsarama – Captain Marvel #10

Newsarama – Civil War II #7

Talking Comics – Civil War II #7

Newsarama – Death of X #4

Newsarama – Detective Comics #945

Comic Attack – Horizon #5

Atomic Junk Shop – Paper Girls #1

Newsarama – Wonder Woman #11

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

adbook01_coverartWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: AD: After Death #1 (Image Comics) – Scott Snyder and Jeff Lemire are two of my favorite people in comics. Now they will be together with Lemire doing some fantastic art (one of his talents that is very underrated) on a book that they call part comic and part prose. This book asks the question, what if we could cure death? I am sure not everything will go well, but time will tell. What would a world with no death be like? Would it be as great as we think? The previews I have seen so far are beautiful, and I am very excited for the story this oversized book will tell.

The Mighty Thor #13 (Marvel) – After an excellent first issue of The Unworthy Thor that saw the return of Odinson, we will return to the current and actual holder of the Thor title. This issue will see the start of a massive war, and it will be interesting to see how this affects not only Thor, but Odinson as well. What will Odin do? Or Loki? This series has been fantastic all the way back to the last run. The story is great, the art is some of the best in comics, so yes, this is definitely high on my list.

Dept. H #8 (Dark Horse) – Who did it!? That’s the question we are all asking along with our protagonist, while everyone tries to avoid drowning to death. The water is rising and so are tensions. As they search for answers, they also have to search for a way to survive. Did someone sabotage the base? It would sure seem it. Matt and Sharlene Kindt have been doing such a fantastic job on this book and I expect that to continue.

Detective Comics #945 (DC Comics) – The Victim Syndicate continues, and I want to find out more about these characters. We basically know they want to make Batman hurt for what they think he did to them, but how far will they take things? It definitely seems like pretty far if the last issue is any sign. This is one of the best DC books, and probably my favorite bat book each month, so I am definitely looking forward to this.

bsusa_002_cover-a_braithwaiteWonder Woman #11 (DC Comics) – Speaking of the best DC book, this just may be it. Wonder Woman is probably their most consistent title, and Greg Rucka is writing a heck of a tale, well two tales each month. I love the going back and forth between the year one and the current storyline, and seeing how they tie together. Will we finally get some big answers this issue? This is a book everyone should be reading every month. Highly recommended.

 

Alex

Bloodshot U.S.A. #2 (Valiant) – I’ve recent been reading the earlier issues of Bloodshot from a few years ago, which has gotten me incredibly excited to get my hands on this issue with a new found appreciation for the character.

Venom #1 (Marvel) – Knowing next to nothing about this series, or Venom’s history since the symbiote was bonded to Flash Thompson, this is going to be an interesting read. Hopefully, it’s a little more than half decent.

Ninjak #21 (Valiant) – I’m looking forward to this more for the end of the arc than anything else. I’ve been pretty underwhelmed by The Fist And The Steel arc, although it was a perfectly serviceable story, it just didn’t do it for me. I’m hoping the next arc will be different, but we have to read this first.

 

warlords_of_appalachia_002_a_mainBrett

Top Pick: AD: After Death Book 1 (Image Comics) – Scott Snyder and Jeff Lemire. Those two names alone should give you enough reason to pick up this first issue. The concept is interesting and Joe covered that above, but these are creators who I expect quality when I see their names and they consistently deliver. I don’t flinch at recommending this one and it’s near the top of my reading list.

Civil War II #7 (Marvel) – I’ll be the first to say this event has been a disaster from the beginning, but it’s a trainwreck where I want to see what happens next.

Death of X #4 (Marvel) – Filling in the gaps post-Secret Wars we finally find out what happened to Cyclops and a few others. That’s enough to get me to check out this final issue of the miniseries and also to see what happens next with the next event IVX.

Captain Canuck #10 (Chapterhouse Comics) – Comics should be fun and Captain Canuck consistently delivers that without the grim and dark that so many others rely on.

Warlords of Appalachia #2 (BOOM! Studios) – Might as well get ahead of the curve in what very well may be a prescient series. The story involves an uprising from Kentucky post second Civil War… entertainment is feeling a bit too real here.

Rebirth Review: Comics Released on 11/16

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

This week saw a lot of good comics that may not be as accessible as other issues in their respective series, but that’s often par for the course, eh?


aqm_cv11_dsAquaman #11 Thanks in a large part to the flashback sequences in the opening couple of pages, and the expositionary dialogue as the comic progresses, this is a quite Friendly comic that ties up one arc and lays the ground work for the next. The level of accessibility here isn’t something you’re likely to see in a story arc at this point in it’s cycle, which is refreshing.

Batman #11  I’ve read every issue of the series so far and this feels Unfriendly to me. New readers will struggle immensely  if they start here, not least because the issue isn’t all that good.

Cyborg #5 I feel like this is one of DC’s  monthly titles because it feel like a long time since I last read an issue, and I’ve been looking forward to getting my hands on a copy for what feels like awhile. The first half of this comic is very Friendly, and worth the price of the comic alone. The second half… is less friendly, but just as interesting.

Green Arrow #11 Is a beautiful looking comic that uses the double page spread to excellent effect, but it’s not overly accessible for those looking to start reading about the Emerald Archer. Unfriendly, but check back with #12.

gls_cv11_dsGreen Lanterns #11 After ten issues it was bound to happen, but this is the most Unfriendly comic in the Green Lanterns series to date. If you’ve read the last issue or two then you’ll be golden, but starting here may not be as good of an idea. That said, it’s a great read.

Justice League #9 Alright, so here’s the thing. The only way you’ll ever be able to pick up an issue of Justice League is if you have some level of familiarity with the characters on the team. Assuming you do, then you’ll be able to pick up enough clues as to what happened last issue to be able to follow along with the story here. More or less, anyway. A Friendly comic, assuming you’ve half an idea who the members of the League are.

Nightwing #9 A half decent comic that’s an easy read, not too bad to look at, but isn’t all that friendly, or good. You’re better off either waiting for the next issue and reading a synopsis somewhere, or just waiting for the next issue. An Unfriendly place to begin your Nightwing journey.

Raven #3 I find that this is the series that I’ve had the hardest time getting immersed in, and a consequence of that is that I tend to forget the details from the previous issue – ironically enough that’s kind of ideal for this feature. That said, despite not really knowing, or remembering much about Raven, I found this comic surprisingly Friendly, ssquad_cv6_dseven if it isn’t my cup of tea (although I did enjoy it a fair bit).

Suicide Squad #6 There’s two ways of approaching this issue. Either you have no idea who the Suicide Squad is, in which case you’ll be confused as hell here, or you kinda know who they are, which means you’ll be only marginally confused – but  you’ll at least find this to be almost Friendly.

Superman #11 This is the kind of comic that you want to start reading with. It’s not perfect in it’s accessibility (it is part two of a two part story, after all), but it’s more than Friendly  enough to draw new readers into the series. I highly recommend you read this, and maybe even the issue before, as this is one of the better series from DC post Rebirth.

Trinity #3 A fantastic comic that builds on the previous two issues in such a way that leaves new readers scratching their heads. That said, there is a very interesting look into Batman’s psyche and the relationship between DC’s Trinity, but if you’re interested in the series then start with the first issue.

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Barbie Wonder Woman Doll

The daughter of Zeus and a fierce Amazonian princess, Wonder Woman is prepared to fight! Adapted from the film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, this fully articulated doll captures the movie-accurate detail of her iconic red and gold armor and the elegant features of Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. This Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Barbie Wonder Woman Doll features her iconic Warrior headdress, armored bracelets, and armored Knee-high boots. This doll also includes her sword, shield, and her iconic Lasso of Truth. Doll measures about 11 1/2-inches tall.

batman-v-superman-dawn-of-justice-barbie-wonder-woman-doll

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: DC Super Hero Girls Action Dolls

Inspired by an interpretation of iconic DC Comics characters in a high school setting, who are learning to hone their super powers, the DC Super Hero Girls line of toys is a fresh take on classic characters. Folks can explore their own inner heroes with this assortment of dolls designed to lead to super hero fun. There’s two assortments. One features Harley Quinn, Poison Ivy, and Bumblebee and the second features Wonder Woman, Supergirl, and Batgirl!

dc-super-hero-girls-action-doll-core-case dc-super-hero-girls-action-doll-non-core-doll-case

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Preview: Wonder Woman #10

Wonder Woman #10

Written by: Greg Rucka
Art by: Nicola Scott
Cover by: Nicola Scott
Variant cover by: Jenny Frison

“YEAR ONE” part five! The world is finally introduced to the Wonder Woman, and adversaries—both ancient and new—take note. This story was previously scheduled to appear in issue #8.

ww_cv10_ds

Around the Tubes

asbm_cv4_dsThe weekend is almost here! What are folks doing? Who’s seeing Doctor Strange for the first time? For the second or third? Sound off in the comments below! While you decide on that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

CBLDF – Vietnamese Creators Fight Against Outdated “Comics Are for Kids” Mentality – Awesome to see this.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Newsarama – All-Star Batman #4

Comic Attack – Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures #1

ICv2 – Becoming Andy Warhol

The Herts Advertiser – Spider-Man: Miles Morales

Talking Comics – Wonder Woman #10

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