Tag Archives: batman

Review: Batman #12

bm_cv12_dsWhen I first finished Batman #12, I was left wanting more. After the twist at the end of the last issue involving Catwoman, I couldn’t wait to see what would happen with the Bat, the Cat, and Bane. Instead, we are given an issue where Batman fights his way through hundreds of men again to get to Bane and Psyco Pirate, who is now joined by Catwoman. I did enjoy the issue when I finished it, but I enjoyed it so much more after I had thought about it. That’s what Tom King does. He is giving us a layered version of Batman, and I am really enjoying that.

We get another letter told throughout the comic, but instead of it being from Catwoman, this time it is from Batman. I really enjoyed the raw look at the man behind the mask. With how vulnerable he was in opening up to Selina, you would think this is more from Bruce than Batman. However, it seems that he is saying he is Batman, because the ten-year-old boy, Bruce died the day he promised to avenge his parents. We are given the line I am suicide, which is not just the name of this arc where Batman forms his own Suicide Squad, but also pointing to the fact that he died that day, and now lives as the face of vengeance. This was great writing, and it is not the first time I and many other people have said this about Tom King this year.

bm_12_2-3The one thing we’ve seen over and over again from Batman, is his parents, and how he deals with it. It’s at the core of who he is. But Tom King finds an angle I haven’t seen before. Bruce reflects on his parent’s laughter, and how he wishes he could laugh. It is such a simple thing people take for granted and it was very interesting to see him hoping for the day where he can find joy in something, and simply laugh. Bruce and Selina have always had a very interesting relationship, and he sums up why in this issue. They are the same thing. They are both dead. When they are together, and they kiss, they see each other’s deaths. Now, of course, they are not truly dead, but this shows that it isn’t Bruce being Batman, it is Batman being Bruce. He and Selina open up for only each other. That is very powerful coming from he hero of few words, and with her seemingly betraying him, you really feel for Bruce (or Batman) by the end. As much as he says he’s dead to the world, it is obvious Selina matters to him, because she makes him feel.

The art by Mikel Janín is nearly flawless. I am glad he is on this title, and I hope he stays around for awhile. Like Tom King, he is a super talent. Hugo Petris and June Chung do a nice job on inks and colors as well. Most of the comic is filled with large page filling panels with Batman either fighting a ton of henchmen or making his way through and outside of the prison. It is strangely beautiful and is a nice contrast to the dark nature of Batman’s letter, the betrayal he is feeling, and the prison itself.

While I wanted a conclusion and a final showdown between the Bat, the Cat, and Bane, this was still a great issue. It may feel like a filler or unnecessary issue to some, but either way, we learn more about Batman here, and Tom King is doing a great job at showing the humanity, the flaws, and the heart of the Caped Crusader. He is doing this to help Gotham Girl. That is what being dead is to Batman, to give his life for the city and people he has sworn to protect.

Story: Tom King Art: Mikel Janín Ink: Mikel Janín/Hugo Petris Color: June Chung
Story: 8.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Batman #12

Batman #12

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Mikel Janin
In Shops: Dec 07, 2016
SRP: $2.99

“I AM SUICIDE” part four! As Bane decimates Batman’s team, the Dark Knight must decide how far he’s willing to go-and who he’s willing to sacrifice-for those he left in Gotham City.

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Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

motorcrush01_coveraWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Logan

Top Pick: The Wicked + The Divine #24 (Image Comics) – Last month’s experimentalism was pretty fun and it was nice to finally see Kevin Wada do some interiors, but it will be nice to see Jamie McKelvie’s take on the brave new world for the Pantheon now that Ananke is out of the way.Motor Crush #1 (Image)- The creative team of the always fun and adorable Batgirl reunites on a creator owned title. It will be exciting to see Brenden Fletcher, Cameron Stewart, and Babs Tarr with full creative freedom in this new Image release. Plus biker gangs are cool.

Motor Crush #1 (Image Comics) – The creative team of the always fun and adorable Batgirl reunites on a creator owned title. It will be exciting to see Brenden Fletcher, Cameron Stewart, and Babs Tarr with full creative freedom in this new Image release. Plus biker gangs are cool.

Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love #2 (DC Comics) – I can’t wait to be drawn into the wonderful Gothic world and web of relationships in Deadman #2. Plus queer love triangles are all too rare in mainstream comics.

Midnighter and Apollo #3 (DC Comics) – Midnighter fighting demons to save Apollo is the kind of romance-driven ultraviolence that I’ve come to expect from Steve Orlando’s work on the character. I’ve really been enjoying Fernando Blanco’s panel layouts too.

Conan Omnibus Vol. 1 (Dark Horse) – One of my favorite writers (Kurt Busiek) on one of fantasy fiction’s most iconic characters.  I wasn’t reading comics when his original run came out, but can’t pass up this 472 page feast of blood, guts, swords, and sorcery.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Voracious: Feeding Time #1 (Action Lab: Danger Zone) – I’ve already read the Kickstarter  reward pdf, but this week marks the first chance those who didn’t back the project get to read the comic, and I’m excited for you. The entire series has been phenomenal up until this point, and I can’t wait for you to read this comic.

Faith #6 (Valiant) – This is one of the most entertaining comics from any publisher right now, and on any other week this would be the comic that’s on top my list to read first, but this is also the week that the second Voracious miniseries begins. That being said, I fucking love Faith.

Ninjak #22 (Valiant) – A standalone story is something we’re seeing less and less in comics these days, so that’s one reason I’m looking forward to this issue of Ninjak. The other is that this will likely be the calm before the storm, and I’m curious to see what Matt Kindt has in store for us here.

Superman #12 (DC Comics) – Superman versus Frankenstein? Hell yeah!

The Unworthy Thor #2 (Marvel) – I must admit, I do enjoy a good redemption story, and the first issue was great. My only reservation on the series as a whole is that I hope Odinson doesn’t get his old hammer back.

 

Joe

Moon Knight #9 (Marvel) – Wow this comic is crazy. Literally. What is going on with Marc? I mean Jake? I mean… you get the idea. With each comic this series gets more and more confusing, but I am a big Lemire fan and trust his storytelling. This book is at its best when you’re not questioning it. Sit back and enjoy the trippy Egyptian ride.

The Unworthy Thor #2 (Marvel) – Odinson and Beta Ray Bill space road trip! When we last saw these two in the first issue, Odinson is given Bill’s hammer and told there is another Mjölnir out there. Also, where the heck is Asgard?!

The Wicked + The Divine #24 (Image Comics) – While I think the magazine of Pantheon was a cool idea, I am glad we will get back to the fantastic story. I feel like it has been forever since we got a regular issue and it has been too long considering what happened!

Midnighter and Apollo #3 (DC Comics) – This is a great series. Basically you get a version of Batman and Superman with the twist that they are together romantically. Their relationship is not cliche, and is believable and I love these characters. The only downside is for now this is only a miniseries that runs six issues.

Batman #12 (DC Comics) – The twist with Catwoman in the last issue has me excited to see where the fourth part of “I Am Suicide” goes. Unless he is toying with them, Batman may have just been outsmarted, at least for a moment. I love this version of Catwoman so far.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Motor Crush #1 (Image Comics) – The creative team of Brenden Fletcher, Cameron Stewart, and Babs Tarr alone is reason enough to get this comic. Seriously that’s all I need to see and I’m in to check out the series.

Atoll #1 (Creative Mind Energy) – This comic has had some issues with publishers and I’ve been waiting for it to finally hit shelves and folks to check it out. It feels right at home with torture porn horror in many ways, but unlike those types of films this story had me sucked in wanting to see what happens next. Writer Tim Daniel and artist Ricardo Drumond nail it with this first issue and I can’t wait to read the next.

Invisible Republic #13 (Image Comics) – The series followed a journalist seeking the truth about an uprising and this second story arc is more about the fallout concerning all of that as we get a better look at Earth and its relationship with the rest of humanity’s reach. In today’s political climate this sereis feels more relevant than ever.

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #1 (Marvel) – The break out character is getting her own series!

Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye: Revolution #1 (IDW Publishing) – Revolution is winding down and we’re getting a better sense of how it all fits together.

Rebirth Review: November 30th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
bm_annual_cv1new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

This week only saw two annuals released, so expect a much shorter post than normal.



Batman Annual #1 
The beauty of this annual is that for the most part the collection of stories within the comic are standalone, taking place at various different times over Bruce Wayne’s history as Batman, but always centered around the holidays. This makes it easily one of the most Friendly Batman comics released thus far, but whether it’ll allow you to smann_cv1ease your way into the other Bat-books is debatable. Still, it’s absolutely worth the price of admission.

Superman Annual #1 Is a little less accessible than the other annual released this week, but has a bit more of a direct connection to the regular series as it instead has Superman and Swamp Thing doing something that, honestly, is largely forgettable; the annual is a good one but far from integral to the story at large, which I feel is not the intention. This is technically a Friendly comic, but I don’t think it’s relevant for your enjoyment of the series.

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: Highly Collectible Misprinted Batman Pin Mate

Score the Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Batman Armored Pin Mate Wooden Figure misprinted as a “Peg Pal“. This rare figure was the very first Pin Mate ever made by Bif Bang Pow! and was previously only available to 2016 Toy Fair attendees. Limited-time offer. Limited quantities available. Order yours today.

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This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Preview: Batman Annual #1

Batman Annual #1

(W) Tom King, Scott Snyder, Paul Dini, Steve Orlando, Scott Wilson, Ray Fawkes (A) Riley Rossmo, Neal Adams, Declan Shalvey, Bilquis Evely (A/CA) David Finch
In Shops: Nov 30, 2016
SRP: $4.99

“SILENT NIGHT”! A hush of winter snowfall has fallen over Gotham City…but a quiet night in this place is never truly quiet. Batman and his allies-and his many foes-stalk the streets in this icy showcase of top talent.

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Review: Batman Annual #1

batman-annual-1A month before Christmas, Batman Annual #1 taps into the Caped Crusader’s lighter and more whimsical side with heartwarming stories from comics greats like Tom King, Scott Snyder, Ray Fawkes, Paul Dini, David Finch, Declan Shalvey and Jordie Bellaire, and Neal Adams, who colors his own pencils in a super fun Harley Quinn/Batman team-up story that pokes funs at her overwhelming popularity. Then, the comic takes a turn for the freaky with a couple of unsettling stories from Steve Orlando, Riley Rossmo, and Ivan Plascencia and Scott Bryan Wilson, Bilquis Evely, and Mat Lopes. This is where the comic takes a downturn in quality with Wilson, Evely, and Lopes’ story relying on verbose Batman narration instead of the thrills and chills of villain, who kills with her victim’s DNA.

The current Batman creative team, Tom King and David Finch with colorist Gabe Eltaeb, lead off the annual with a funny story about Batman adopting a dog. The fact that Finch and Eltaeb draw and color it in a slick, yet traditional superhero makes it even more hilarious as Alfred tries to house train Ace (who of course becomes the Bathound) while Batman is off taking calls on the Bat-computer and ignoring this adorable pooch, who was trained by the Joker to be an attack dog. As in most Tom King comics, there is a lot more under the surface as the story illustrates the fact that while fighting the big picture of crime in Gotham, Batman sometimes forgets to connect with individual people… and animals. And Alfred reminds him of this fact in a panel that will make long time Batman readers smile as he places a little mask on Ace, and the first story of Batman Annual, like many of the DC Rebirth comics, expertly blends the traditional and forward thinking.

The visually strongest of all the Batman Annual stories is the second one where Batman enjoys a silent night in Gotham courtesy of Scott Snyder, Ray Fawkes, Declan Shalvey, and Jordie Bellaire. Like most of Snyder’s Bat-stories, the setting of Gotham plays a major role as Batman now has a special Bat-signal that cycles through all the emergency calls and helps him jump into action quicker , but Snyder and Fawkes don’t go the criticizing Batman’s problematic and illegal surveillance route.

bm_annual_1_4Instead, they rest on the lean minimalism of Shalvey’s pencils and inks and the even keel color palette of Bellaire, who doesn’t go primary color bright or full black and gray dark to show what a crime-less moment in Gotham feels like for Batman. There are repeated panels of computer code that stop lighting up as two acrobats perform for Gothamites as Champions Square, a kind of Switzerland for both criminals and ordinary citizens. Batman investigates the acrobats, but literally, nothing wrong is happening. Snyder returns to the theme of Alfred and Batman as father and son for a short moment when Alfred shares some British special forces wisdom telling him to rest for the moment because “the bombardment will surely resume.” And it does with Shalvey and Bellaire crafting a full-page splash of the hero in action with a billowing cape in tow.

In a dream-like story, Paul Dini returns to his most famous creation, Harley Quinn, with legendary Bat-artist Neal Adams in tow. Adams’ work is superior to his recent work on Coming of the Supermen as he colors his own work, and you can still see much of his original linework like when Batman accidentally starts singing Christmas carols with Harley Quinn. The story fits into Harley’s more heroic, yet still, wacky alignment as a gang of basically her cosplayers keeps Gotham safe so Batman can have an uneventful holiday of listening to Harley wail Christmas carols. These look-alikes symbolize the omnipresence of Harley Quinn in 2016’s pop culture as Dini rejoices in her stardom, and Adams’ art is definitely up to the task of showing her unbridled energy as she still wants to go Christmas caroling at 4 AM after a long drive from Gotham to Coney Island.

In Steve Orlando, Riley Rossmo, and Ivan Plascencia’s story, the tone of Batman Annual #1 switches from broad comedy to horror. This is despite the comic opening with a campy riff on Arnold Schwarzenegger’s performance as Mr. Freeze in Batman and Robin with a villain, who wants to start a new Ice Age. Plascencia’s colors for the aptly named Minister Blizzard are a rich blue, and you can feel the winter chill as you turn the page. And it brightens as Batman beats up Blizzard in front of a crowd of poor children, who get to be happy and watch their hero save the day in front of him. Rossmo also gives Gordon some humorous reaction panels as he watches Batman completely dismantle the bad guy. His features change to maybe feeling a little bit sorry for Blizzard as Batman’s punches draw blood.

But, in the final page, funny and heartwarming switches to horror as Rossmo brings out the gore and the shadows to go with Plascencia’s red and blacks. There is a twist ending as the kind Gotham philanthropist, Barry O’Neil, meets a grisly end, and Batman can’t do anything to stop a new villain called the Stag, who sports long, spindly fingers and a creepy mask. And they are supposed to return in 2017 so be prepared for more chills in various Batman or other DC comics to ring in the New Year.

Scott Bryan Wilson, Bilquis Evely, and Mat Lopes’ story in Batman Annual #1 is the most ambitious of the five and also the most disappointing. The comic has the clever setting of an Arkham Asylum Christmas party that the villain Haunter spreads a special mix of fear gas to give the inmates anxiety as she runs off to be with her friend, Scarecrow. She has the ability to kill using DNA, but Wilson talks about this ability more than cutting loose Evely and Lopes loose to show it. He also spends a lot of time having Batman narrate his plan to defeat Haunter instead of showing his cleverness the ending is pretty fantastic though with Batman leaving Haunter and Scarecrow giving them a choice to try to survive them in the cold. instead of just sending them back in Arkham even if the story seems overpacked for a six pager.

Batman Annual #1 shows a rare heartwarming side of Batman and his crusade to fight crime with the Christmas holidays as a backdrop and also acts as a showcase for comics talent, old and new.

Story: Tom King, Scott Snyder, Ray Fawkes, Paul Dini, Steve Orlando, Scott Bryan Wilson Art: David Finch, Declan Shalvey, Neal Adams, Riley Rossmo, Bilquis Evely Colors: Gabe Eltaeb, Jordie Bellaire, Ivan Plascencia, Mat Lopes
Story: 8 Art: 9 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Entertainment Earth Spotlight: Armored Batman Statue on Sale Now!

“Tell me, do you bleed? You will.” This exceptional 1:6 scale polyresin statue based on the Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice film features impressive detailing of the Dark Knight wearing his armored suit. Be sure to order today!

batman-v-superman-dawn-of-justice-armored-batman-1-6-statue

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

inhumans_vs__x_men__0Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: Seven to Eternity #3 (Image) – The first two issues told a lot of story in such a short time. More comics could learn from this. The first issue set up the legacy of the family name and the big bad, and the second introduced us to him and then a whole new band of characters. Let’s see what Remender has planned for the third issue! So far this series has been awesome.IVX #0 (Marvel) – Death of X did not fully satisfy me, but the surprise ending did. Let’s hope this series is a lot better, as it is leading us into the new Inhuman and X-Men titles coming this spring. I am hopeful that Lemire and Soule come through big here for this event and get people excited for what’s to come.

IVX #0 (Marvel) – Death of X did not fully satisfy me, but the surprise ending did. Let’s hope this series is a lot better, as it is leading us into the new Inhuman and X-Men titles coming this spring. I am hopeful that Lemire and Soule come through big here for this event and get people excited for what’s to come.

Great Lakes Avengers #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was so fun and goofy, and I loved it. The art by Robson is fantastic, and the jokes by Gorman worked well. The entire premise is ridiculous and it just makes it better. This isn’t even a b level team of Marvel heroes, but that doesn’t make it any less enjoyable of a premise. I highly recommend this if you’re looking for something light and fun.

Batman Annual #1 (DC Comics) – DC is bringing in all of the bat writers on the annual. I usually don’t get very excited for annuals, but I am for both this and Superman hitting the same day. This book will have Snyder, King, Dini, Orlando, and Scott Wilson writing with Riley Rossmo and Neal Adams on art. I am hyped!

saga40-01-covSaga #40 (Image) – If you haven’t read Saga yet, please go start. This is what is arguably the best comic out today. I am eager to see where Vaughn and Staples takes us this issue, as we follow these incredible characters on their wild adventures. This book can make you laugh, cry, and smile all in one issue.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Savage #1 (Valiant) – I can sum up why this is awesome in three words: Tarzan meets dinosaurs. It also looks savagely brilliant.

Batman Annual #1 (DC Comics) – Paul Dini and Scott Snyder writing Batman all in one book? Sounds ideal.

Conan The Slayer #5 (Dark Horse) – A consistent story that not enough people are talking about. If you’re a fan of sword and sorcery then you owe it to yourself to check this out.

Old Man Logan #14 (Marvel) – It’s been awhile since I enjoyed a solo Wolverine series as much as I have been enjoying this. A new arc starts this issue, and I’m pretty excited to dig in.

Revolution #5 (IDW Publishing) – A left field surprise for me; I can’t wait to see how this epic crossover ends.

 

Brett

copra_round_four_cover_bergen_streetCOPRA Round Four (Bergen Street Press) – If you haven’t been reading Michel Fiffe’s series you’re missing out on some of the best comics out there. The indie series is collected here in the fourth trade and it’s worth every penny. The series is best described as an indie Suicide Squad and it’s absolutely awesome. This is the only series I buy single issues and the trades.

Fish Eye #1 (Scout Comics) – The publisher has been putting out some fantastic comics and this new series is well worth checking out. The concept is about a cop who is on a reality show whose ratings are slipping and he has to protect his family from a group of killers. Sounds interesting!

The Skeptics #2 (Black Mask Studios) – The first issue was solid taking place during the Cold War and featuring con-men pretending to be psychics to fool the US government. It’s a crazy concept but the style and characters have me coming back and been looking forward to this one.

Inhumans vs X-Men #0 (Marvel) – I’m a sucker for Marvel’s events and this first issue is pretty solid. It catches up new readers while also setting up some new stuff as well.

The Revisionist #6 (Aftershock Comics) – Time traveling entertainment and I seriously have no idea where it’s all going. With an 80s action film flair, this is one to read from the beginning, it’s so good.

Rebirth Review: DC Comics Released 11/23

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

This week saw a lot of good comics that may not be as accessible as other issues in their respective series, but that’s often par for the course, eh?


ac_cv968_open_order_varAction Comics #968 Aside from having a couple elements from previous issues being referred to here, this is actually a really good place to hop into one of DC’s better series. Is this an ideal starting point? Not really, but then unless you want EVERYTHING that’s happened before spelled out for you, this is as good a place to start as any because the comic more on the action, and isn’t bogged down by excessive plot details (there’s enough one line explanations in dialogue and narration to give you the gist of things). Friendly, and very much worth reading.

Batgirl #5 There’s a line in this comic that perfectly sums up the comic; “and I’m still not sure what happened…” Maybe the next issue will be a little more accessible. Unfriendly.

Batman Beyond #2 If you want to get into this series, and didn’t pick up the first issue, you’re better off starting there. The second issue does a lot more for the plot when read after the first (hey look, the sky’s blue!), but is a little too Unfriendly a place to start reading. If you’re not curious about the series itself, then I don’t suppose you’ll be interested in the story within a story of Batman’s last encounter with the Joker, eh?

Blue Beetle #3 This starts out confusing as hell, but I think that’s the point of the comic. After a few pages you’ll start to feel much more familiar with the characters (especially Jaime’s reluctance to wear the scarab), and aside from a few mentions of characters and event not present, or explained, in this issue, I’d say this is actually a blue_cv3_dspretty Friendly issue.

Deathstroke #7  As has been the case with almost every issue in this series aside from the first, this is an Unfriendly comic. That being said, I would highly recommend that if you’re curious about the character or the series that you wait for the trade – I have a feeling the story being told here will excel in collected format.

Detective Comics #945 This is another comic that has a little bit of expositionary dialogue at the very beginning of the comic that will probably feel a little forced in the inevitable trade, but works in the single issue format to turn the comic into a Friendly one, despite this being the third chapter of the story.

The Flash #11 may not be the best place to hop into the series, but this should be Friendly enough should you choose to do so here.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #9 While it isn’t explained why the Green Lantern Corps are working with a squad of Yellow Lanterns, nor why Hal is where he is, this is actually more than Friendly enough for you to dive in and start reading the series.

hjglc_cv9_dsHarley Quinn #8 To be completely and utterly honest, I am far from a fan of this series – but I do understand why others like it, it’s just not my cup of tea. That being said, however, as an almost standalone story this is going to be Friendly for those who are interested in the character; and it’s a story I actually enjoyed.

The Hellblazer #4 is one of those comics that I quite enjoyed, but had very little idea what was going on. The small bit of insight I did have was from reading the first issue (and maybe the second), so unless you’ve also done that you’ll likely find this to be an Unfriendly comic.

Teen Titans #2 Not only is this a Friendly comic, but it’s also fantastically entertaining. The story centers on Robin and his parental legacies as a device to pull the team back together after the “death” of Tim Drake, and much to my delight it’s working wonderfully.

Titans #5 For a comic that takes place in less than seven seconds, there’s a lot of story thrown at you, but it never feels overwhelming. Wally West’s narration recaps enough of what’s previously happened that you don’t feel too out of the loop – the speed of the story juxtaposed with the narration lends the story a brilliantly Friendly feel.

Sixpack & Dogwelder #4 This is far from being an accessible comic. Easily the most Unfriendly comic this week.

Wonder Woman #11 isn’t the best place to start reading the series, and yes it is Unfriendly, but it’s also going to really shine when a person has read the story in collected form, or regularly. Just don’t start here if you want to get the most from the story.

 

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