Tag Archives: batman

Mondo’s Batman: The Animated Series 1/6 Scale Figure is Up for Pre-Order Now

Based on Batman: The Animated Series, the Batman 1/6 Scale Figure stays true to the television classic. The figure is sculpted to match the iconic style of the show. It features a paint scheme evoking the bold, graphic look of an animated cell. There’s approximately 30 points of articulation, multiple switch-out hands, heads, accessories, and a Bat Symbol figure stand. Batman comes fully equipped to keep Gotham – and your collection – safe and sound!

The Mondo Deluxe Exclusive (only available until March 12th) features a switch-out wind-swept cape, goggles, unique “Thumbs-Up of Bat Approval” hand, unique batarang, and a switch-out H.A.R.D.A.C. head!

Both versions are now up for pre-order!

Batman: The Animated Series 1/6 Scale Figure. Approx. 12” in height, Material: PVC, ABS. Artists: Ramirez Studios, Jason Wires Productions, Joe Allard. Expected to Ship 4th Quarter of 2018. $125 – Payment Plans Available

Batman: The Animated Series 1/6 Scale Figure (Mondo Deluxe Exclusive). Approx. 12” in height, Material: PVC, ABS. Artists: Ramirez Studios, Jason Wires Productions, Joe Allard. Expected to Ship 4th Quarter of 2018. $150 – Payment Plans Available

Preview: Batman #41

Batman #41

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Mikel Janin
In Shops: Feb 21, 2018
SRP: $2.99

“EVERYONE LOVES IVY” part one! Mikel Janin returns to BATMAN for a brand-new epic! Pamela Isley’s influence can spread as far as vegetation will allow, putting the whole world at her fingertips. Can Batman and Catwoman stand their ground against an entire planet of Poison Ivys?

DC Rebirth Roundup: Feb 14th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

DTC_Cv974Action Comics #977 Superman recaps his own story pretty well, but what isn’t explained is that Lois Lane has gone to rescue her father from a firing squad in a hostile country where the US military aren’t able to go. Oh, and Superboy is with her. It’s a ridiculous concept, but Friendly nonetheless. 6.5/10

Detective Comics #974 Batwoman just killed Clayface, who was trying to reform himself (and currently failing thanks to the machinations of the Victim Syndicate). This issue deals with the aftermath of that fateful action, but is still Friendly  enough to pick up. 7.8/10

The Flash #40 Grodd is back and wants the Speed Force. A bunch of people are trying to help Grodd against the Flash, and shit is hitting the fan. The comic is frenetic, yet Friendly, and worth reading. 7.7/10

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #38 Hal Jordan and Kyle Raynor were sent to a planet to investigate an illegal mining operation, and found that Zod and his family were responsible. Then they got their asses handed to them. The comic is Friendly, and quite an interesting read, 7/10

New Super-Man And The Justice League Of China #20 The newly renamed series kicks off a new era in the team’s career as they face off against a new threat. It’s as Friendly a place to start as you’re going to get now, and it is worth picking up if you’re half interested in the series. 7.8/10

Red Hood And The Outlaws #19 Bizarro has developed a super intelligence level after he died and was resurrected – but have Red Hood and Atemis noticed? Read this Friendly-ish comic and find out. 7/10

Suicide Squad #35 The first part in a new arc is as Friendly a starting point as you’re likely to find. 7/10

Titans #20 The Titans have disbanded, and Roy Harper is going against Intergang alone (accidentally) as he works to eliminate a drug supply chain. A Friendly issue that follows the teams as they live their separate lives. 7.7/10

Wonder Woman #40 Wonder Woman and her newly discovered brother have just come off slightly worse for wear against the Silver Siren, a former friend of Diana. As a concluding part of the story this is still accessible enough for you to pick up and enjoy

DC Rebirth Roundup: Feb 7th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

BM_Cv40_varBatman #40 The conclusion to a two part arc (ignore the “part four” on the cover- the first two parts have nothing to do with the second two other than they share a slight thematic similarity) that saw Batman and Wonder Woman fighting a horde of demons for 37 years in a place where time is frozen while the usual horde fighter, the Gentle Man, takes a rare break to see his wife. The first part wasn’t great, but the arc is redeemed with this issue. It’s sorta Friendly, but another win for Tom King. 8/10

Deathstroke #28 I’d give you a recap if I knew what the hell was going on anymore. This issue is a touch Unfriendly due to it’s reliance on previous events in the story, but  not bad over all. 6.5/10

Green Arrow #37 There’s a lot to get through here so that you get the basis of the story… but it can be narrowed down to this: Ollie Queen is on trial for murder, the victim is in shock from what actually happened to her (she was sold to people traffickers) so Ollie won’t make her stand as a witness. On top of that, his mother who is suddenly not dead, is i league with the people who framed him, the Ninth Circle, and is about to offer them a significant sum of money. Oh, and Malcolm Merlyn just shot Ollie’s sister with an arrow. This may not be too Friendly, but you can still read this comic and enjoy it. 8/10

Green Lanterns #40 A new story line dealing with the trafficking of superheroes starts here, and because it is the first part in the story, the comic is Friendly7.5/10

Justice League #38 I have no idea what’s happening here. Priest is a good writer, but he’s near unpenetrable if you miss a few issues in a row – but when you catch his entire run, then it’s well worth reading (in trade or in floppy as long as you get it all).

Nightwing #38 Nightwing is up against the Judge, a manipulative villain who can make people do almost anything in return for their deepest desires. A man with whom Dick Grayson has history, and feels responsible for every life on the Judge’s hands. The comic is kinda Friendly, and worth reading. 7/10

Superan #40 Another new and subsequently Friendly issue. 7.5/10


That’s a wrap for this week folks. I’ll see you next time!

Review: Mother Panic/Batman Special #1

PanicBatmanIn the second chapter of DC Comics/Young Animal crossover “Milk Wars”, writer Jody Houser, artist Ty Templeton, and colorist Keiren Smith serve up a large helping of Catholic guilt. Mother Panic/Batman Special uses religious iconography and of course, dairy products, to look at the sadness and loneliness at the center of both Gotham vigilantes. Templeton’s art fluctuates from bright pop art bursts similar to his work on Batman ’66 to a more Gothic style when Mother Panic thinks about her terrible childhood at the Gather House and how she killed her father. Along the way, he and Houser pose the question of whether vigilantes, especially ones of the darker side, should take child sidekicks, and they draw a parallel between the Gather House’s brainwashing and Batman dressing up young boys (And occasionally a girl.) in yellow capes and green pixie boots.

Even though she’s almost 80 years younger than him in character years, Violet Paige aka Mother Panic wasn’t about to get upstaged by Batman in this comic. In the issue’s funniest meta joke, Violet’s swearing is censored, but she has no fucks left when she infiltrates the new Gather House and sees Batman in a priest’s collar preaching to a group of children in a Robin costume. As he rants about how none of this is real, Batman aka Father Bruce and the “Holy Sidekick Choir of Merciful Justice” point out her surface-level moral failings like her use of profanity and breaking random 10 Commandments. However, she is after the truth of what is going on with these kids and knows that everything isn’t okay.

PanicInterior

The breaking point is when Violet sees a young girl that she’s saved multiple times in the main Mother Panic series enter the sidekick creation machine thing (It’s like something out of the Lego Batman games, but more nefarious.) and knows that she wants her to break the cycle of violence and revenge. After this, Ty Templeton loses the gaudy, religious trappings and replaces them with a flurry of quick hitting panels as Batman and Mother Panic go mano a mano and fight for reality itself. The fight choreography reminded me a lot of Batman ’66 especially with Keiren Smith’s bright background colors, and the “Milk Wars” theme of light exterior, dark interior continues in Mother Panic/Batman Special. On the outside, it looks like it’s Robin cosplay day or a Sunday School class, but these kids are being trained to go to war just like Violet was when she was a young girl with the body horror replaced by bright surrealism.

Even though it’s a crossover comic, Houser and Templeton find time to develop the character of Violet Paige between the crazy quilt of visuals and milk puns. A strong emphasis is placed on Violet’s strength as she sees through the ecclesiastical illusion and defies the Gotham City vigilante tropes to own her dark past instead of repressing it with toys and child sidekicks. However, as Mother Panic/Batman reaches its conclusion, Violet’s strength becomes tempered with responsibility because she lets the would-be Fennec Fox, who tugs on her cape and looks up to her as an inspiration, stay in her guest bedroom. Her war on crime doesn’t have to be a solo flagellation, and perhaps she can use her wealth and sense of empathy that is buried beneath snark and violence to help people and be a light and not a burning torch. It’ll be interesting to see if this thread continues in the conclusion of “Milk Wars” and the upcoming Mother Panic: Gotham A.D. series.

In Mother Panic/Batman Special , Jody Houser, Ty Templeton, and Keiren Smith deconstruct the child sidekick trope and takes a look at the connection between childhood trauma and masked vigilantes through the imagery of religious liturgy. Just like JLA/Doom Patrol showed how the “traditional family” could be a cover for all kinds of evil, Mother Panic/Batman goes for organized religion. These institutions, in and of themselves, are not bad, but can be used for nefarious ends because of their primal connection with humans. The comic doesn’t go full religious satire, but it’s a memorable framing narrative. I am never going to get the six panel Batman Year One  remix with him becoming a priest and not a “bat” out of my head.

Lastly, but certainly not least, Mother Panic/Batman also features the second installment in Magdalene Visaggio and Sonny Liew’s Eternity Girl serial featuring revenge, oozing body parts, and a late Bronze Age aesthetic. The two pager is a like an eye catching teaser trailer and has gotten me more excited for the upcoming miniseries with its play on superhero and horror tropes.

Story: Jody Houser Art: Ty Templeton Colors: Keiren Smith
  Backup Story: Mags Visaggio Backup Art: Sonny Liew 
Story: 8.1 Art: 9.5 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics/Young Animal provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Around the Tubes

It was new comic book day yesterday. What’d everyone get? What’d you enjoy? Sound off in the comments below. While you decide on that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Comichron – Action 1000 hardcover, Thanos lead comic shop advance reorders as February begins – For those following the horse race.

CBR – 2000 AD To Publish First All-Women Creators Issue – Good.

 

Reviews

IGN – Amazing Spider-Man #795

IGN – Batman #40

Talking Comics – Hungry Ghosts #1

Comic Book – Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman

Seattle PI – Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman

Comic Attack – Is’Nana The Were-Spider Vol. 2 #1

The Outhousers – Spider-Man #237

IGN – Star Wars #43

IGN – The Walking Dead #176

IGN – X-Men: Red #1

Preview: Batman #40

Batman #40

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Joëlle Jones
In Shops: Feb 07, 2018
SRP: $2.99

“SUPERFRIENDS” part four! Since the beginning, the friendship between Batman and Wonder Woman has stood at the heart of the DC Universe. Now that friendship is coming apart, and as it does, the universe itself begins to crumble. The conclusion of Batman’s team-up with Wonder Woman. (This story was previously slated to run in BATMAN #39.)

DC Rebirth Roundup: Jan 31st’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pick up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


DTC_ANN_Cv1Deathstroke Annual #1 Leaning heavily on the previous events in the series, this isn’t the easiest annual to just pick up and read, but it does give you a sense of where the series is at currently, so in that sense it’s almost Friendly6.7/10

Detective Comics Annual #1 The origin of Clayface (re)told! This issue is very Friendly for new readers, and is also perhaps the best comic DC have put out all week. Exploring the tragic fall of Basil Karlo as he transforms into the monster Clayface, Batman is seldom seen here, instead becoming a bogeyman in the dark as we watch a man turn into a monster. 8.7/10

The Flash Annual #1 Wally West (the red headed Wally) was lost in the timeline for the entirety of the New 52, and now he’s back – but the world doesn’t remember him. This annual focuses a little on the fallout of a previous story in The Flash, but there’s no recap needed as the relevant details are all included. The annual itself tends to center around Wally West’s journey and sets the character up for the next year or two (or more) with some cool Speed Force moments to quench your thirst for Flash action. Yes, this is Friendly, and it’s also worth checking out if you’re interested in the Scarlet Speedster. 8/10

SLNCR_Cv1Harley Quinn #36 It has been a long time since I read this series, so there’s no recap to be had, but once you figure out that Harley has somehow been infected by the Man-Bat serum, you’ll find this Friendly enough if you do want to read it. I was reminded of why I haven’t missed the series, however. 5/10

The Silencer #1 A new character from the events of Dark Nights Metal, and thus no recap necessary (I say that because I have no idea where the original appearance for the character is – it could well be this issue for all I know). The comic’s Friendly, though with little obvious to tie in with Dark Nights Metal. Worth a read if you enjoy John Romita Jr’s art. 7/10


That’s a wrap for this week folks. I’ll see you next time!

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day tomorrow! What’s everyone excited for? What do you plan on getting? Sound off in the comments below.

The Beat – The Top 20 Graphic Novels of 2017 Prove Diversity in Comics is Alive and Well and Selling a Lot – Nothing to add *mic drop*

Newsarama – Lee Weeks Joining Tom King on Batman Title For a Mr. Freeze Arc – This should be a solid combo.

Comic Book – ‘Shazam!’: Grace Fulton Confirmed for Mary Marvel – Interesting…

 

Reviews

Newsarama – The Silencer #1

ICv2 – Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman

Underrated: Books On The History Of Comics.

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week:  Books On The History Of Comics.



Last week we looked at why comic book history was Underrated. This week, we’ll look at some books that, should you be interested, will help shed some light on the stories behind the stories.

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story by Sean Howe was published in 2012. Howe decided to write the book because the stories comic creators told in fanzine interview always seemed different from the official narrative. Starting with the comics published during the golden age, and the characters created by Jack Kirby, Joe Simon and Stan Lee, the book follows the publisher’s story to the new millennium up until the creation of the Marvel Cinematic Universe with upwards of 150 interviews conducted by the author.  GQ’s Joshua Rivera described the book as “one of the most comprehensive and well-researched accounts” of Marvel.

Bill The Boy Wonder written by Marc Tyler Nobleman with art by Ty Templeton. Presented as a childrens book, Bill The Boy Wonder tells the untold tale of Batman’s creation. By shining a light on who Bill Finger was, Nobleman’s extensive research led to Finger finally getting a byline credit whenever Batman appears. The book’s presentation is designed to allow as many people, of any age, to learn about Bill Finger – and it works.

Superheroes!: Capes, Cowls, and the Creation of Comic Book Culture by Laurence Maslon and Michael Kantor.  Assembled as a companion piece to the three part PBS documentary series Superheroes, this volume chronicles the effect of superheroes on American culture through the various mediums they appear in, and conversely the effect of America culture on superheroes. Featuring more than 500 full-color comic book panels, covers, sketches, photographs of both essential and rare artwork, Superheroes is an in-depth look at this powerful presence in pop culture.

Super Boys: The Amazing Adventures of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster – the Creators of Superman by Brad Ricca. Published in time for the 75th anniversary of the Man of Steel, comes the first comprehensive literary biography of Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, the co-creators of Superman Brad Ricca’s Super Boys is the first ever full biography about Superman’s creators, and with more than ten years of research he made some interesting discoveries; the book reveals the first stories and pictures ever published by the Siegel and Shuster, where the first Superman story really came from, the template for Superman’s costume, and more than will be listed in this blurb

The Art of the Simon and Kirby Studio by Joe Simon, Mark Evanier, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. At nearly four hundred pages, this historical look at the art produced by the Simon and Kirby studio is a must for any fan of either artist. The reproduced comics allow you to actually see the corrections done to the artwork such as drawings over areas of white-out, the faint lines used as reference for writing the text, portions of the panels being pasted over with bigger pieces of paper with bigger corrected drawings, the yellowing clear tape… The look into the creative process of these men is captivating.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History by Andrew Farago. Detailing the story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from their humble beginnings in black-and-white comics to where they stand now as four of the most recognizable in animation and comics, this book features interviews with the characters creators and other key figures in the Turtle’s ascendancy. With reproduction artifacts from the Turtle’s history, including their debut, this hardcover book is worth looking into for any fan of the pizza loving teenagers.

 

This is by no means a definitive list of books to look up, but merely a selection to get you started, and there are obviously many, many more great books out there to delve into; far more than I have listed here (you’ll find a few purely from Amazon’s suggested list after looking these up). But that doesn’t mean we should stop learning about the medium’s history, eh?


Next week’s Underrated will look at some other aspect of the comic book world.

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