Tag Archives: batman

Unboxing: Loot Crate’s April 2017 Box “Investigate”

Loot Crate‘s April 2017 release has arrived and here’s what you can find inside. The theme for this month is “Investigate” so check out what’s inside including items from Jessica Jones, Batman, Stranger Things, and The X-Files.

There’s a decent amount of items in the box and some cool properties, but how do they stack up?! Find out!

You can get your Loot Crate here!

 

 

Loot Crate provided a FREE box for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

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Gotham Weekly With Alex And Joe: Episode Three

This week on Gotham Weekly Alex messes up the intro before he and Joe talk about Batman (obviously); Tom King’s current run on the main Batman title, Scott Snyder’s All-Star Batman, and Nightwing. There’s also some discussion over whether The Dark Knight is still the best comic book movie out there now that Logan has been seen by both hosts.

As always there will be spoilers for the following

Batman #19
Writer: Tom King Art: Danny Miki, David Finch

All-Star Batman #8
Writer: Scott Snyder Art: Mark Morales, Giuseppe Camuncoli

Nightwing #17
Writer: Tim Seeley Art: Javier Fernandez

 

Review: Batman #21

Batman #21 is a strange prologue to “The Button” storyline that will connect Watchmen  to the DC Comic Universe as writer Tom King, artist Jason Fabok, and colorist Brad Anderson open the comic with Batman watching a hockey playoff game and spend most of its running time having him get the crap beaten out of him by the Reverse Flash. The beauty of Batman #21 definitely comes in its subtext more than its text as the fight between the resilient Batman and Eobard Thawne could symbolize the pain DC readers, old and new, felt during the New 52. Happiness and family are good things, but this crossover doubles down on darkness to start out even if the constant use of the smiley face button and the nine-panel grid gets a bit repetitive. Yes, we know it’s an homage to Watchmen, let’s move onto two of DC’s greatest detectives investigating a universe spanning

From his work on Justice League and Batman and Robin Eternal, Jason Fabok has demonstrated that he has the clean lines of superhero action and musculature down to a science. He can draw Batman’s jawline, The Flash/Reverse Flash’s lightning, and a double page splash without distracting from the reading experience. To this firm foundation, Fabok adds plenty of punishment as Batman is no match for The Reverse Flash, and Anderson shows that his black can barely handle Eobard’s yellow. He does use his ingenuity to get a few licks in until The Flash is back to save the day. (Or does he.) The blood flying off Batman’s body as he takes a beating from Reverse Flash reminds readers of his humanity, in light of a possible divine presence getting involved with the DC Universe.

Batman #21 is a less of a part one of an epic crossover mystery than an extended mood poem by Tom King and Jason Fabok on how dark and grisly the DC Universe has gotten. The cutting between a hockey fight and an interpersonal fight was used way back in Kevin Smith’s Chasing Amybut they take it into a melodramatic extreme with death instead of a few minutes in the penalty box. It’s also a nod to Watchmen where the seemingly unrelated pirate comic that pops up is thematically connected to the events of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ seminal graphic novel. Basically, Dr. Manhattan or characters from the Watchmen universe are going to destroy the denizens of the DC Universe. This is exhibited in the final few pages where one of the most powerful supervillains, Reverse Flash, is turned into a slavering mess.

Except Batman #21 is really just a tasty appetizer before the (hopefully) feast that is “The Button” storyline. It’s a great tapas plate, but leaves you wanting a juicy steak, like some actual Watchmen characters and not just an exercise in formalism with the nine panel grid with each panel elapsing exactly a second or teases about the Legion of Superheroes and Crisis on Infinite Earths. The presence of the Smiley Button is a constant teaser as Reverse Flash and Batman play with it and with audience expectations before ending on an slightly satisfactory cliffhanger and whetting your appetite for the next installment in The Flash.

Despite having bone breaking art from Jason Fabok and Brad Anderson, Batman #21 is more of a prologue than a part one. However, on a pure craft level, it is a wonderful demonstration of how comics can speed up or slow down time with a single minute stretched over many pages just like how Dr. Manhattan sees the world. Hopefully, King and company will continue to put their own variations on these old themes and not be content to play dive bar covers of classics past.

Story: Tom King Art: Jason Fabok Colors: Brad Anderson
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.7 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Around the Tubes

It was new comic book day yesterday. What’d everyone enjoy? What’d you dislike? Sound off in the comments below. While you think about that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Kotaku – Popular Japanese YouTuber Is Getting His Own Manga – Interesting to see. Guess we’ll have to review this for our Manga Monday!

Newsarama – History Channel & Morgan Spurlock To Decode Superheroes – This could be interesting.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Newsarama – Batman #21

Atomic Junk Shop – Mega Princess #5

Talking Comics – Ninjak #26

The Outhousers – Regression #1

Newsarama – Secret Empire #0

Preview: Batman #21

Batman #21

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Jason Fabok
In Shops: Apr 19, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“THE BUTTON” part one! The cataclysmic events of DC UNIVERSE: REBIRTH #1 continue here! The Dark Knight and The Fastest Man Alive, the two greatest detectives on any world, unite to explore the mystery behind a certain blood-stained smiley button embedded in the Batcave wall. What starts as a simple investigation turns deadly when the secrets of the button prove irresistible to an unwelcome third party-and it’s not who anyone suspects! It’s a mystery woven through time, and the ticking clock starts here!

Retailers: This issue will ship with four covers. Please note that this issue’s lenticular cover edition is available only in the US and Canada.

Rebirth Recap and Review: Comics Released 4/12

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for

new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

AC_Cv977_dsAction Comics #977 Superman Reborn is over, which means that if you haven’t read any Superman stories post Rebirth, then you’re going to find that this is easily one of the Friendliest places to start.

Batgirl And The Birds Of Prey #9 A series that I occasionally love and occasionally just find okay, I often forget the previous issue… and I don’t really remember too much here, other than Black Canary has gone undercover in an underground fighting ring in order to break into a metahuman training school. It’s a Friendly issue, even for those who may have forgotten much of the previous issues.

Detective Comics #954 Gotham is under siege from the allegedy mythical League of Shadows led by Lady Shiva (not to be confused with R’has Al Ghul’s League of Assassins). Batman is on his back foot, having lost almost all of his allies, he finds himself face to face with his greatest enemy whilst the militant force patterned on Batman’s crime fighting menace escapes his custody. It’s Friendly enough, if you accept that you may be a bit lost.

The Flash #20 I don’t remember whether I read the last issue or not (which, really, is never a goo sign), so there’ll be no recap here; just a Friendly enough comic to enjoy.

Justice League Of America #4 Cards on the table, I really don’t like this series, but if you are tempted by a well drawn extended fight sequence then you can either jump into the first finale in the series… or wait till next issue which, unlike this one, should be Friendly.

NSM_Cv10_dsNew Super-Man #10 Lex Luthor is, surprise surprise, trying to take advantage of the New Super-Man by activating his unactivated powers the easy way through a literal gate to Hell. Kenan’s mentor is, as you can imagine, quite opposed to the idea of his pupil taking the easy way out. This is probably not the easiest place to jump on board, but it’s Friendly enough that you can enjoy the issue with minimal backstory.

Suicide Squad #15 A good conclusion often makes for an Unfriendly jumping on point, and that’s the case here. Romita Jr’s art is decent, although there’s an artistic switch up that leaves Waller changing body shapes as fast as Clark Kent changes his costume.

Supergirl #8 This is actually a pretty Friendly place to begin as Kara spends much of the issue reminiscing with her cousin.

Titans #10 The Flash and Nightwing were captured by the Fearsome Five (who faked losing their powers, but actually haven’t), and the rest of the Titans are going to rescue them. There’s not much more you need know, honestly, to enjoy the mayhem of this Friendly issue.

Wonder Woman #20 The opening line of this comic is “absolutely beyond our capacity to explain,” which is how I feel about this series. It’s unfortunate because I truly think that beneath the two concurrently running stories that would do more to confuse a new reader than help them is a brilliantly woven tale.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: Batman #21 (DC Comics) – Ohhhhh yeah, it’s here! The famous button tease we’ve been given since DC Rebirth started. I’m hoping for this and The Flash to deliver on a big reveal or at least push us toward one soon.

Super Sons #3 (DC Comics) – What a fun book that features two young boys who are constantly competing, oh and they also are super heroes. But seriously, at it’s core, this book is the coming of age of two young boys finding themselves, and friendship in each other, as they try to live up to the massive legacies of their dads.

Moon Knight #13 (Marvel) – I love this comic, and we only have two more issues left, this being one of them. I really hope we get somewhat of an answer in this or the next comic, so it goes out with a bang. Lemire and Smallwood have been phenomenal on this run.

The Wild Storm #3 (DC Comics/WildStorm) – Three issues into the relaunch with Ellis and I’m in. I loved the first issue, and while the second issue felt a bit wordy after the action of the first, I bet that was mostly for world building with a bunch of the core characters, and trying to get that out of the way. I am excited for this run!

Superman #21 (DC Comics) – I’m always looking forward to a Superman book, especially since Rebirth began. This and Action Comics have been spectacular.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Ninjak #26 (Valiant) – I fell in love with this series last issue – it is currently one of my favourites from Valiant… if you like your Batman with a touch of Nightwing, James Bond and swords, then you may like this too.

God Country #4 (Image) – There’s a lot of personal reasons why this series is striking a cord with me, but the stubborn humanity of the series protagonist in the face of overwhelming odds is what’s pulled me in the farthest.

All-Star Batman #9 (DC Comics) – It’s Scott Snyder and Batman. I will always be excited for this.

 

Paul

Top Pick: Secret Empire #0 (Marvel) – So Captain America is running Hydra and he and his Nazi squad are poised to spread across the world, bringing to life their idea of a ‘perfect’ world. Yeah, ok. And yes, Hydra ARE Nazi’s, I don’t care what back peddling some writers have put out there to smooth things over. If you read that awful Civil War II tie in ‘The Oath’ is was clearly laid out what Steve sees for the future of the world…and you’re going to tell me those images didn’t look exactly like what the Nazi’s have done in the past? Ok, rant over…I am looking forward to seeing how this unfolds and to watch the super heroes kick Hydra’s ass.

Super Sons #3 (DC Comics) – I am so glad I took people’s advice and read this book. It’s only on issue #3 but it has been an incredible start and it just keeps getting better. I love this pair up of Superboy and Robin; how different they are leads to some great banter and the action has been great. And I’m really interested in finding out more about this Kid Amazo. Pick this one up if you haven’t, you will not be disappointed.

U.S.Avengers #5 (Marvel) – This title has been hit or miss with me. It hasn’t totally wowed me, but it does have it’s moments. I’m mostly looking forward to seeing how this SHIELD based team reacts to Steve Rogers new, Hydra influenced direction. And I’d love to see Sunspot and Cannonball team up to kick his Hydra loving ass…wishful thinking.

 

Shay

Top Pick: Black Panther: World of Wakanda #6 (Marvel) – The arcs keep getting better and the creative team shows no signs of slowing down the awesome train.

Batwoman #2 (DC Comics) – Kate Kane is facing frenemies , her own personal demons and, the bioweapon Monster Venom on the renegade heavy isle of Coryana.

Harley Quinn #18 (DC Comics) – Harley Sin is hunting a new victim and Harley Quinn is trying to find them first. It’s like Spy vs Spy, if the spies were bad ass ladies and interesting.

Nick Fury #1 (Marvel) – Nick Fury vs Frankie Noble on the French Riviera. Got Popcorn?

 

Brett

Top Pick: Roughnek (Gallery Books) – A brother and sister who must come together after years apart to face the disturbing history that has cursed their family. If that doesn’t sound interesting enough, it’s all by Jeff Lemire. That should easily sell this alone.

Descender #21 (Image Comics) – Amazing science fiction that’s as awesome to look at as it is to read. This is a series to check out if you haven’t yet.

Hellboy: Into the Silent Sea (Dark Horse) – Mike Mignola and Gary Gianni team up for a fantastic graphic novel.

Monsters Unleashed #1 (Marvel) – I got more sold on this series the longer the mini-series went on. I’m really intrigued to see where it goes from there.

Shaolin Cowboy: Who’ll Stop the Reign #1 (Dark Horse) – Geof Darrow, nuff said.

 

DC Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Aquaman Vol. 2 and Batman Vol. 2

It’s Wednesday which means new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We’ve got two more volumes from DC Comics featuring Aquaman and Batman!

Aquaman Vol. 2 Black Manta Rising collects issues #7-15 by Dan Abnett, Scot Eaton, Brad Walker, Philippe Briones

Batman Vol. 2 I Am Suicide collects issues #9-15 by Tom King, Mikel Janin, and Mitch Gerads.

Find out what the trade has in store and whether you should grab yourself a copy. You can find both in comic stores April 12 and bookstores April 18.

Get your copies now. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Aquaman Vol. 2 Black Manta Rising
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Batman Vol. 2 I Am Suicide
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

DC Rebirth Recap & Review: Comics Released 4/5

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for

new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


AQM_Cv20_dsAquaman #20 Aquaman is fighting some kind of water demon called Deadwater (disclosure: Deadwater probably isn’t a water demon, I just don’t remember the last issue that well) who can teleport wherever there’s even a drop of water. It’s kinda intense, yet quite Friendly.

Batman #20  I’ll save you the pain, and suggest you wait till next issue. Hopefully it’ll be less Unfriendly, and tell a better story.

Cyborg #11 I don’t remember the last issue (yeah, my memory isn’t great… I know), but there’s a very Friendly internal monologue at the beginning of the comic that helps quite a bit.

Green Arrow #20 The conclusion of the three part story detailing the return of Roy Harper to Green Arrow’s life. While I’d recommend you reading the arc, this would be an Unfriendly place to start the series.

Green Lanterns #20 One day, I’m going to remember the previous issue to a comic before I read the following one. Case in point this one – I have only the vaguest recollection of previous events, but basically Doctor Polaris trapped the Green Lanterns in a big ball of metal underwater so he can escape and cure his brother of cancer. The only problem? Doctor Polaris is a borderline psychopath. The issue itself is surprisingly Friendly.

Justice League #18 There’s another universe/timestream ending event that the League NTW_Cv18_open_order_varhas to prevent. They’ve been split up and sent to various different points in the timestream to fight something that’s happening at the same time in the past and present… if that sounds confusing, then you may want to skip to the next arc.

Nightwing #18 If you have fond memories of Dick Grayson as Batman with Damian Wayne’s Robin, then you’ll enjoy this story. The two have partnered to find Nightwing’s pregnant girlfriend, and former villain, Shawn Tsao and rescue her from the clutches of Professor Pyg. It’s awesome, and the awesomeness makes it Friendlier than not.

Superman #20 A new arc kicks off here, and as always it’s a Friendly place to begin, but quickly kicks up the pace.

Underrated: Batman Vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice Ultimate Edition

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Batman Vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice Ultimate Edition.


 

Batman v Superman Dawn of JusticeLet’s not beat around the bush here: the theatrical cut of Batman Vs Superman: Dawn Of Justice wasn’t the greatest superhero movie of last year and while it wasn’t the worst comic book movie of the year, it was perhaps one of the most disappointing – for me at least. I had expected so much from the movie, because it was fucking Batman and Superman on the big screen together. And… well we got an average movie. There were parts that were great (Ben Affleck and Gal Gadot), and parts that were pretty good (Henry Cavil), and… some less than savoury parts. I left the theatre feeling quite unsure of how I felt; did the good outweigh the bad, or did it balance it out? What didn’t click for me? Could the movie had been better?

Shortly after seeing the movie I found out that there would be an R rated extended cut of the film released for home media, and I wondered whether that would do anything to set the film right.

As it turns out, it did.

Almost every problem I had with the pacing, plot and direction of the movie was made better by the extended cut. I still wasn’t happy that the entire movie had effectively been told in short form in the trailers, but there wasn’t much I could do about that other than not watching the trailer in the first palace. Since that wasn’t an option…

Look, I get that Warner Brothers probably had concerns about audiences sitting for an extended period of time… I mean the near two and a half hour run time of the theatrical cut was the longest movie in recent memory, and understandably Warner’s were concerned about audiences attention spans. It’s not like we’d ever sit patiently during Lord Of The Rings, or binge watch five hours of Daredevil in one sitting. That’s just not who we are. And to think we’d rather have  a great long movie longer than a slightly shorter average one would never cross their minds. 

It’s okay, though.

Whether it’s thanks to the success of Deadpool, or the critical slamming early on, or both, the Extended cut of the movie is a much better story in every way. The plot holes that resulted from the opening sequence are fixed because of the additional footage showing the soldiers using flame throwers to incinerate bodies to mimic Superman’s heat vision, if you wrote the movie off based on the theatrical cut then you’re missing one of the better superhero movies of last year.

Yeah, I said it.

The Extended edition is a better move than Civil War is, but because the real version of the film was never released in theaters, the movie as a whole got quite an unfair reputation – albeit fairly earned based on the expectations people had for this supposed juggernaut of a film, and what was initially delivered. If you’ve only seen the theatrical cut of the movie, then give the Extended edition a shot. The additional scenes add significantly to the overall experience, delivering a much better experience than anything you’d have expected from the theatrical experience.

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