Tag Archives: superman

Injustice 2 – Shattered Alliances Part 1 Trailer

Every villain is the hero of his own story. Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment and DC Entertainment have revealed a new trailer focusing on Superman’s character and background story for Injustice 2. Players will get the chance to learn more about how Superman and his Regime are working to rise to power once again, becoming one of Earth’s greatest threats.

In development by the award-winning NetherRealm Studios, Injustice 2 features a massive roster of DC Super Heroes and Super-Villains and allows players to build and power up the ultimate version of their favorite DC characters. The game will be available for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One on May 16, 2017.

Advertisements

DC Rebirth Recap & Review: Comics Released 2/15

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

I had a busy week this week, so I didn’t get a chance to read everything – notably Raven #6, Harley Quinn #14, and Odyssey Of The Amazons #2.


 

bm_cv17_dsAquaman #17 This issue is pretty much ah Friendly on it’s own, even if it may not seem so at first. The only relevant bits from the last few arcs is that Aquaman is struggling with his public image as King of Atlantis.

Batman #17 Building upon almost everything that has happened in the last 16 issues, this comic isn’t going to be immediately accessible to new readers. I’ll try and give you a brief recap, but it may still prove to be Unfriendly. In the first arc, Batman met Gotham and Gotham Girl who fell under the mind trap of the Psycho Pirate who made Gotham Girl petrified of everything. Somehow the Pirate ended  up in a prisons ruled by Bane. In order to help Gotham Girl, Batman assembled a squad and retrieved (read forcibly removed) the Pirate from Bane’s prison in order to have him undo what he did to Gotham Girl – a proces that’ll take five days. Knowing that Bane is now quite pissed at the loss of the Pirate and wants revenge, Batman tried to convince Nightwing, Red Hood  and Robin to leave Gotham, only to find them hanging in the cave at the end of last issue.

Batwoman Rebirth #1 If the comic designed to catch you up with Batwoman and set you up for her up coming series isn’t Friendly then there’s something horribly wrong… and right up until the final page, it really is.

Green Arrow #16 Green Arrow has been dragged through the mud recently, with Malcolm Merlyn murdering people with green arrows to frame the Emerald Archer for multiple murders, the most recent of which was Ollie’s friend the police chief. As far as jumping into a series with no background info, this is actually one of the Friendlier ones to do that with.

Green Lanterns #16 The Green Lanterns are in Gotham to help Batman with a Yellow Lantern problem. Last issue saw the Scarecrow infecting people with fear through viral videos, and when one of those he caught in his grasp was Alfred, Simon Baz may have begun to regret his choice to carry a gun…  this is Friendly enough as a jumping on point, I suppose.

ntw_cv15_ds-2Justice League #15 At this point, it’s reasonable to assume you know at least half of the Justice League, and as this is the first part of a new story that really doesn’t require any previous knowledge of the last 14 issues. For that reason it’s Friendly, but be prepared to have no idea what’s going on till next issue.

Nightwing #15 There’s a fair bit that I could recap, but at the end of the day, this is a Friendly comic whether you know what happened prior to this issue or not – which is kind of an interesting thing to say about an epilogue.

Superman #17 A standalone story featuring Superman’s son, Jon. The comic is as Friendly as you’d expect it to be without really featuring Superman at all.

Super Sons #1 The first issue of a series about the sons of Superman and Batman? Oh it’s Friendly.

Trinity #6 Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman have been trapped in a dream world by a plant-child created by Poison Ivy whilst the evil Mongul uses Superman’s body to escape the dream world he was trapped in… this probably sounds stupid, but it’s actually quite Friendly.

Preview: Superman #17

Superman #17

(W) Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason (A/CA) Sebastian Fiumara
RATED T
In Shops: Feb 15, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“DARK HARVEST”! Jon and Cathy go deep into the woods of Hamilton to find a horror that hungers for the new Superboy!

sm_cv17_ds

DC Rebirth: Recap And Review For 2/8’s Releases

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.

There were a lot of new story arcs starting this week, so expect a smaller post as many of the comics didn’t need to much of a recap.


 

dtc_cv950_ds

Action Comics #973 The funny thing about this comic, is that some of the events you’ll need to have a passing familiarity with didn’t actually happen in this issue. Lois Lane and Superman are from the Pre-New 52 DCU, and have found themselves in the post Rebirth world. Now Lois has taken her doppelganger’s place due to a slight case of death but who is the human Clark Kent running around? Meanwhile Superwoman is weakened  and in need of Superman’s help (the reasons why are explained in her own series; Superman doesn’t know why). It’s Friendly, more or less.

All-Star Batman #7 Mr. Freeze released a deadly bacteria last issue, and who better to help with that than a botanist? I actually forgot what was going on in this series and was still able to follow this comic well enough to make it Friendly.

Batgirl And The Birds Of Prey #7 Another Friendly comic. I say this without a recap because I don’t actually remember what happened last issue but I was more than able to follow along here.

Detective Comics #950 The big anniversary issue, and the start of a new arc, so what better place to attract new readers, right? With a bumper sized issue that fleshes out some of the quieter, or lesser known, members of Batman’s new team we get on of the most easily accessible issues in a long time. Each story within is solid is both Friendly, and really quite good.

Flash #16 I didn’t read the last issue, so I can’t really give you much of a recap. Fortunately, the comic does a good job of that on its own, making this an effortlessly Friendly comic.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #14 Part one of a new arc that finds the Green and Yellow Lanterns trying to forge a partnership for the betterment of the cosmos after their numbers were drastically reduced over the course of the last 13 or so issues. This is another Friendly place for you to delve in.

Justice League Of America: Rebirth #1 As with all of the Rebirth specials, this is going to be easy for you to pick up. There seems to be something brewing in the DC Universe, and I’m thinking that with all the hints laced throughout the Batman titles over the past few months, the Batman/Flash series is going to have a part to play in that. Despite my sidetrack, though, this is Friendly.

redhoto_cv7_ds-666x1024Red Hood And The Outlaws #7 All you need to know is that this is a Friendly issue. It’s also relatively standalone, too.

Suicide Squad #11 After the events of the Justice League Vs The Suicide Squad miniseries, Amanda Waller is under investigation for allegedly setting up the whole thing.The Squad are regrouping, but Waller’s up to something. This is a Friendly issue, but only barely.

Supergirl #6 Wraps up an arc in which Supergirl had to choose between resurrecting her family and people or saving her new home. I’m sure you can guess where her loyalties were, which means that if you do grab this issue then you can enjoy the Supergirl vs Cyborg Superman fight – oh, the Cyborg Superman is Supergirl’s father trying to resurrect Kryptonians with a mix of cybernetics and human life force.

Superwoman #7 Lex Luthor is trapped in his armour as his sister wages war with her super powers, and I have no idea what’s happening.

Titans #8  Now that the Titans are reunited with Wally West and settled in Manhattan, this issue sees a new arc kicking off. Because I have next to no experience reading Titans or Teen Titans comics prior to Rebirth, there are some thing I’m not familiar with, such as who a certain character is, but there’s editors notes that let you know where to go to learn more. Overall, this is a Friendly comic.

Wonder Woman #16 The beginning of a new arc finds us at an almost…. Unfriendly  place because I don’t know quite what’s happening, other than I really enjoyed the issue. I’d still suggest you pick this up if you’re curious about the series.

 

Early Preview: Superman #18

Superman #18

Written by: Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason
Art by: Patrick Gleason, Mick Gray
Cover by: Patrick Gleason, Mick Gray
Variant cover by: Gary Frank

“SUPERMAN REBORN” part one! In DC UNIVERSE: REBIRTH #1, the enigmatic Mr. Oz told this Superman, “You and your family are not what you believe you are. And neither was the fallen Superman.” Now, in the first Rebirth crossover between SUPERMAN and ACTION COMICS, the shocking truth behind Oz’s words is revealed. It begins with one of Oz’s prisoners escaping, and ends in a tragic moment for Lois and Superman.

* The covers by Patrick Gleason and Mick Gray and the variant covers by Gary Frank for SUPERMAN #18-19 and ACTION COMICS #975-976 will connect to form a single vertical image.

sm_cv18_ds

DC Rebirth Recap & Review: Comics Released 2/1

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

Aquaman #16 Aquaman stopped a war between Atlantis and the US instigated by a shadowy corporation, NEMO. This Friendly comic picks up in the aftermath of that battle.

Batman #16 Tom King has been weaving his overarching tale across multiple issues, so there’s a lot to go over for this recap. I’m lazy, so let’s keep it real short; Batman needs a villain to help a superhero introduced in Batman #1, and Bane also needs the villain to keep him off venom, so when Batman “rescued” said villain from Bane, he wasn’t happy. This Friendly comic is worth reading for the Batburger scene alone.

nightwing-14-coverCyborg #9 Uh… so I genuinely don’t remember what’s going on here, and that made this issue somewhat Unfriendly. If you want to read this, it’s best to check out either the trade, or the previous issues.This is after all the ninth part of the current story…

Green Arrow #16 A transition issue between story arcs, this issue wraps up a tale in which Green Arrow was framed for murder by the Dark Archer while simultaneously battling some violently crooked cops. Oh, and Ollie’s sister had vanished for a bit but seems to be back now.  It’s Friendly in a round about kinda way.

Green Lanterns #16 This series has been one of the most new reader friendly of all of DC’s post rebirth comics thanks to the love-it-or-hate-it habbit from Sam Humphries of introducing everything at the start of each issue. I could do a recap here, but there’s honestly no need, because it’s Friendly enough as is.

Justice League #14  This is a Friendly standalone issue that really doesn’t need a recap (even though you’ll think it does at first).

Midnighter And Apollo #5 The penultimate issue of the series is actually quite Friendly all on it’s own. Yeah, you’ll miss some nuances and  little bit of the “whys” but you can read this no problem.

superman 16 cover.jpgNightwing #14 Wrapping up the first arc that has Nightwing back in Bludhaven, we find Nightwing trying to stop a murderer and clear some ex-villains who were framed for murder. This is a fun, relatively Friendly comic.

Superman #16 Somebody is stealing the powers of Supermen,/women/rabbits from across the multiverse for some reason or another. Our Superman has a plan to rescue them, and volunteered as bait so the multiversal Justice League can track and save him and the others. Even with the summary, this will be hard to follow as it ties into the wider DCU more than you’d think. For that reason, and the fact it’s not all that good, I’m marking this as Unfriendly.

 

 

 

Immigration And Comics. It’s Our History.

ck-rocket-from-krypton-croppedA version of this originally ran January 2016.

You’d have to have been living under a rock to have avoided the refugee and, to a lesser extent, the immigration discussions occurring this past week due to the executive order signed by President Donald Trump.

As an immigrant myself, it’s a discussion that I’ve been paying some attention too.

First things first, though, is that I should clarify that my situation in no way resembled the plight of those from Syria or other war-torn regions. As a white man immigrating from the United Kingdom it would be offensive to those refugees to say that I know what they’re going through. I don’t.

I genuinely hope that I never will.

Indeed, I have been present in my new country when people start talking about “the immigrants” taking their jobs because they didn’t consider me an immigrant.  This was shortly after asking about my accent. I may be a white guy, but my accent sure isn’t from this side of the pond. That’s about as much prejudice as I have ever encountered on my end, directly, and while I found it exasperatingly funny at the time, it does go to  show the general sense that a (very) few have toward immigrants (at least in my experience, but as I said, mine is not the same as the Syrian refugees. Not even close). Even comparing a refugee to an immigrant is a slippery slope; while some immigrants such as myself arrive in a new country of their own volition, some undoubtedly feel forced out of their homes, due to escalating conflicts or tensions at home. But either way, the immigrant has a little more freedom to make the decision. A refugee has no choice in the matter; they just want their family to feel safe.

And the type of safety that the Syrian refugees are currently seeking, and the scale of the horror’s they are running from is something that many of us have no personal experience with. Hopefully we never will, but that doesn’t preclude us from having some empathy for them, either.

My family have lived in England for as long as I am aware (my Aunt traced my grandfather’s line back to around the 1700’s, give or take), so I can’t knowingly claim that there is any immigration within my family’s past (myself aside), but that’s not necessarily true of people living on this side of the pond.

There are millions of people in North American who can trace their families back across the years and the oceans to other countries, when their ancestors left their home lands for fear of persecution or simply to hope for a better life.

This is especially true when it comes to some of the early and/or influential members of the comic book community.

The Thing KirbyIndeed, many of the greatest names in American comics are often the first generation born in the new country, such as Art Speigelman (the author of Maus), Bill Finger (co-creator of Batman, Green Lantern, and many many others), Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (the men who created Superman). Even Bob Kane‘s (Batman‘s other co-creator) parents were of Eastern European Jewish descent. The point I am attempting to make here is that the sons of Jewish immigrants created some of our biggest super heroes, and some of our greatest stories.

And what of their creations? 

Superman is an alien from another planet who’s family sought refuge for their only child from the end of their world. He is far from native to any country on Earth, yet he has chosen to make the planet his  home. Far beyond just simply moving from country to country, Superman is an interplanetary immigrant that kick started the modern superhero comic. 

And he’s not the only immigrant in comics, either; Supergirl, the Martian Manhunter are but two of the early inter-planetary examples, X-O Manowar is both a geographical and chronological immigrant (it sounds confusing when typing it like that, but the character is as rich and deep as any other on this list). Howard the Duck has been trapped in a world that he’s slowly become accustomed to, but was never his own; and Thor Odinson has been protecting our world for centuries – and even without his hammer he continues to do so. The idea of a hero from the stars come to save humanity (or in the case of Howard the Duck to simply work amongst us) is an idea that as comic book fans we’re all enamored with , and in many cases these interplanetary immigrants have become some of the most beloved, and powerful, characters in the comic book reading world.

Giant-Size_X-Men_Vol_1_1In terms of the more traditional Earthbound type of immigration, the of moving between countries, look at almost the entire second team of X-Men; BansheeColossus, Nightcrawler, Sunfire, Storm and Wolverine are all from countries other than the US. You know what that makes them, eh?

If  these characters were ignored because they were immigrants, both of the interplanetary and Earthbound nature,  would comics, nay, popular culture, even have the same face? The Superman symbol is an internationally recognized symbol of truth, justice, and the American Way, and Wolverine is arguably one of the most popular characters to ever appear in a comic book. What if the parents of the previously mentioned creators, and the numerous others I haven’t named who are also descended from immigrants, were trying to escape their living conditions to provide a better life for their families today? Would we still want to turn them away?

If it wasn’t for the sons and daughters of refugees and immigrants the comic book landscape, and perhaps even our way of life would be drastically different than what we’re used too. Before you add your voice to those who say we should close up our borders, take a long hard look at your family history, at the characters you love, and tell me where you would be if the country you call home had refused to admit any new immigrants at any point in the past two or three hundred years.

Would you still be sat here reading this, if your ancestors hadn’t had the opportunity to live a new life in North America?

DC Rebirth: Recap And Review For Comics Released 1/25

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 


ac_cv972_dsAction Comics #972 
 Superman and his wife Lois and their son Jon are from the Pre-New 52 universe. In the post Rebirth world, Lois and  Jon meet an alternate (powerless) version of Clark Kent who was never Superman, and who thinks that Lois is that world’s Lois (who my or may not be dead).Strangely, that’s a lot Friendlier than you’d think. Meanwhile, Superman is defending SuperLex  from two aliens who want him killed for a crime he might commit in the future. Sound familiar?

Batgirl #7 In order to find this Friendly, all you need to do is read it. The previous six issues play almost no part in this issue as far as I can tell.

Batman Beyond #4 Terry McGinnis went undercover in the Jokerz, a group of utterly sane people who worship the Joker, to rescue a childhood friend. It… didn’t go so well. Now his little brother is trying to get a Batsuit to him before things get worse. Friendly, and fun.

Detective Comics #949 So… this issue is the conclusion of the three part Batwoman Begins, and yet it also seems to signify a book end to the first volume of the post-Rebirth comics. It’s not a bad comic, but there’s too many nuances from the lat six or so months to try and recap here. Wait to pick up Batwoman Rebirth #1 and/or Detective Comics #950 if you want a fix of either of  the two heroes in this book. They’ll probably be a better place to start than this Unfriendly issue.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #13 This Friendly issue is basically a recap of the last 12 issues in the series wrapped up in a standalone story set sixty years from now.

Justice League Vs Suicide Squad #6 This final issue of the six issue miniseries. Honestly, if you’re curious, either read the trade or track down the floppies. Starting here will give you jlareb_kfrost_cv1_dsan idea of what’s to come in the DCU, but not what happened in this story. For that reason, I’m not going to stay on the fence with this and not mark it as either Friendly or Unfriendly.

Justice League Of America: Killer Frost Rebirth #1 Best read after the JLvSS mini series, this Friendy comic is a nice insight into the title character.

Odyssey Of The Amazons #1  The first issue of a six part mini that takes place long before Wonder Woman should be Friendly, right? To nobody’s surprise, it is.

The Hellblazer #6 I missed a couple of this series somehow, so I really have no idea what exactly is going on, but I was still able to enjoy the comic. I guess that makes it Friendly, eh?

Six Pack And Dog Welder: Hard-Travellin’ Heroz #6 I’m not going to try and recap this, because it wouldn’t make any sense if I did. Just know that while this single issue is Unfriendly the trade that will inevitably collect the mini should still be on your bookshelf.

Suicide Squad #10 Serves as an epilogue to the JLvSS mini series, so for that reason I’m calling this Unfriendly.

Teen Titans #4 Oh how I love this series. Damian tried to put together the Teen Titans again (they didn’t like him very much) to combat a group of League of Assassins trainees called the Demon’s Fist – a group that Damian used to lead. In order to save the Titans after they barely survived, Damian turned himself into Ra’s Al Ghul…

Wonder Woman #15 Although there are some utterly fantastic layouts in this comic, the story itself wasn’t as easy to follow. To get you caught up, essentially all you need to know is that Wonder Woman had some kind of mental snap and isn’t sure who she is right now. Meanwhile Steve Trevor is on the run from some people. The comic is kinda friendly, but toward  the end of it I was feeling  less and less sure of what was happening.

 

DC Comics HeroClix: Superman vs. Muhammad Ali Convention Exclusive!

WizKids has announced their plans for the upcoming 2017 WizKids National Championships as well as an exciting reveal of the DC Comics HeroClix: Superman vs. Muhammad Ali Convention Exclusive Set. This year, there will be numerous National Championships around the globe where players can win limited edition prizes, purchase convention exclusives figures, and qualify for the 2017 WizKids World Championship, to be held at Origins Game Fair in Columbus, Ohio.

For the first time, HeroClix fans will be able to bring The Greatest of All Time to the tabletop with the DC Comics HeroClix: Superman vs. Muhammad Ali Convention Exclusive Set! This special HeroClix set that will only be available at events on or after April 1st.

In 1978, legendary boxer Muhammad Ali proved that he truly was the Greatest of All Time by defeating the strongest man on Earth – Superman – in the pages of DC Comics’ historic Superman vs. Muhammad Ali issue. Far from a grudge match, this battle would ultimately set the two up to save the planet from an alien invasion, ending in the proclamation “WE are the greatest!”

dc-comics-heroclix-superman-vs-muhammad-ali-1 dc-comics-heroclix-superman-vs-muhammad-ali-2 dc-comics-heroclix-superman-vs-muhammad-ali-3

DC Rebirth: Recap And Review

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for
new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

aqm_cv15_dsAquaman #15 The conclusion to The Deluge is actually relatively Friendly without a recap.

Batman #15 Catwoman may or may not have murdered a couple hundred people. Batman gave her one last night of freedom in Gotham before he takes her to prison in the morning. After stopping a few crimes, and having a chat, they end up naked on a roof together… This could be a Friendly comic with that recap, but I don’t know if it’s worth your time.

Green Arrow #15 Ollie has been framed for numerous murders by the Dark Archer. He also beat the snot out of a crooked cop who was assaulting a civilian a few issues ago. That’s more or less enough to get you into the visually amazing Friendly comic.

Green Lanterns #15 Is actually an incredibly Friendly issue. We focus on Jessica Cruz’s greatest battle, and it’s a comic that gives us quite an insight into her character.

Justice League Vs. The Suicide Squad # 5 (of six) As you may imagine, this issue sees the story rocketing toward the conclusion of the arc, so what do you need to know to not feel lose? Well, Max Lord – a villain who can influence your darkest desires, who has a misguided sense of eroism – has taken control of the Justice League minus Batman via some kind of mind controlling diamond, and that’s… pretty much it. I’d still recommend you read the series as a whole rather than starting here, but it’s Friendly enough, I suppose.

Nightwing #13 Having just arrived in Bludhaven for the first time post Rebirth in order to find himself again, Nightwing comes across a supervillain support group who are being gradually framed for murder. The Bludhaven PD aren’t thrilled with having a superhero ntw_cv13_dstake up residence in their city, either… this Friendly book has become one of the best Bat family books from DC in recent months.

Superman #15 Last issue had a lot of build up that can basically be boiled down to the following: someone is hunting Supermen across the multiverse, and our Superman has teamed with President Superman and some others to stop them. This is a Friendly, and enjoyable, story.

Superwoman #6 Lois Lane and Lana Lang were both Superwoman until Lois was killed in issue #1. Since then, Lex Luthor has been locked up by his sister (no, we didn’t know he had one either), who has become Ultra-Woman – essentially a very comic book villain version of Lex Luthor who is trying to do something nefarious. The comic is kinda  Friendly.

Trinity #5 Uh… I don’t actually remember too much about the last four issues, but the relevant parts are skimmed over enough in the comic that I wasn’t lost. It’s Friendly enough, I suppose, although  you may want to track down #4.

« Older Entries