Tag Archives: superman

Review: Trinity #2


*Warning Spoilers Below*

Francis Manapul pulls out all the stops for an amazing sophomore issue to the new Trinity series. DC Comics should be proud. Issue #2 of the Trinity series give us part two of “Better Together” a story line that has Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman visiting Clark Kent’s past and visiting his father while Lois and Jon deal with his absence and his fight to save their present.

This time jump is sure to send ripples through the timeline as Superman comes face to face with his dad and younger self. The fear of the trio showing up and the presumed death of his father sends a young Clark Kent running away and encountering one of the very threats that Superman was trying to avoid. Superman gets to have a warm but, real conversation with his dad on fatherhood and love while Batman fears that having contact this close with his Superman’s past self could make things worse.

As the trio, joined by a bewildered and weakened from the shock Mr. Kent, search for the lost and frightened young Clark, Superman falls into a lake with some Kryptonite residue that weakens him. Young Clark forms an alliance with the mysterious force haunting the trio causing them to do some real soul searching with disastrous effects. When the reunion between Mr. Kent and young Clark finally happens the joy of the moment is overshadowed by the appearance of Poison Ivy who has tricked young Clark into planting seeds that may bring about the destruction of them all.

Francis Manapul‘s writing is pretty damn good and the story tugs at the heartstrings. His style is honest and open and gives a voice to the complexity of the characters with a nice sense of empathy for their situation. It evokes feelings of family and what someone, no matter how powerful, would do with   one last chance to talk to someone they loved and loss. His writing provides us with a glimpse into the soul and desires of Superman and makes him appear human and even though he’s invisible for the most part physically, he still has some vulnerability. Manapul makes Superman easy to relate to and real which makes this issue a refreshing turn for the hero.

Manapul also provided the artwork for this issue , which means that everything works well together and comes off as seamless and purposeful No stroke is unnecessary, now line is without purpose and every panel serves the purpose of drawing the reader in and pushing the story along. The style is pretty old school and simple but, brilliant and beautiful in its simplicity. The art work does not overpower the words or the story, it enhances them.

The symbiosis between the story and the art make issue #2 of Trinity an overall great comic. Everything about it is damn near perfect and I am looking forward to see what happens when the trio returns to the present to face the threat that has them on a time run. Will Poison Ivy’s seedlings cause a change in Clark Kent/Superman? Will the timeline be forever changed for the worse? Will there be a Jon Kent and/or Lois Lane in his life in the future? So many questions and such a worthy story arc to wait and find out.

Story: Francis Manapul Art: Francis Manapul
Story: 9.2 Art: 9 Overall: 9.1 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Rebirth Review: Comics Released 10/19


Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


aqm_cv9_open_order_varAquaman #9 May not be as accessible as other comics released this week, but going in all you need to know is that Aquaman has to stop the unstoppable. If you know that, then you’ll be treated to a fantastic, and just about Friendly, comic.

Batman #9 The first part of a new story arc that stems from the I Am Gotham arc that can be found in the first few issues if the comic. If you’ve read that, then you’ll be fine. If not, due to the way King has built his story, you may find this Unfriendly.

Cyborg #3 Once you get past the first few pages, the Unfriendliness drops considerably, but not quite enough to cross the line into the comic being accessible for new readers. but it is close.

Green Arrow #9 a surprisingly Friendy comic because it lets the action tell the story with only a minimal amount of backstory needed.

hqgh_cv6_dsGreen Lanterns #9 Seems to be an ideal set up for the next story arc, most likely  introducing a major player along the way. Despite not really featuring either of the two lead characters, this is a Friendly comic.

Harley Quinn #6 Despite being the second part in the story, I feel that this is Friendlier than the last issue, but it’s still a little off the wall in a fun kinda way.

Justice League #7 It’s almost an accessible comic, because the story is explained just enough to allow new readers to hop on board. The thing is, is that there’s just something missing from the comic to make it a truly friendly comic. That’s why I’m saying it’s Unfriendly.

Nightwing #7 The first part of a new arc is, typically, a pretty good jumping on point for new readers, and this is no exception. Yes, reading the first arc would help by giving you an introduction to Raptor, but it’s not as integral to your enjoyment of the Friendly comic as you’d think.

Raven #2 Is a good comic, but it almost straddles the line between friendly and unfriendly, although it weighs heavier toward the Unfriendly side. The deal breaker is that you probably should read the first issue before this one to get a foundation for the story.

Superman #9 Clark and Jon a trapped on an island of dinosaurs. If you want a fun comic, this is for you, and it’s very Friendly to boot, but if you want to know why… then it’s not as friendly.

Trinity #2 There’s two ways to look at this comic; one is as a great Superman story featuring Batman and Wonder Woman or the second part in a hopefully epic story. Either way, the comic is still Friendly.

Around the Tubes

death-of-x-2The weekend is almost here! What geeky things will you all be partaking in? Sound off in the comments!

While you decide on that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Around the Tubes

CBLDF – Documentary The Trial of Mike Diana Coming in 2017 – Could be very interesting.

The Beat – Riri’s no-no: Marvel gets schooled on teen fashion and sexualization – It’s a bad cover people! How did it get approved period!?


Around the Tubes Reviews

Talking Comics – Death of X #2

ICv2 – Platinum End Vol. 1

Talking Comics – Superman #9

Preview: Superman #9

Superman #9

Written by: Patrick Gleason, Peter J. Tomasi
Art by: Jaime Mendoza, Doug Mahnke
Cover by: Mick Gray, Patrick Gleason
Variant cover by: Kenneth Rocafort

“RETURN TO DINOSAUR ISLAND” part two! Trapped on a strange island removed from time, Superman and Son encounter a lone survivor from the past. He may hold the key to their escape, but first they must survive the other denizens of the Island.


TV Review: Family Comes First in Supergirl S2 E2 “Last Children of Krypton”

Supergirl -- "The Last Children of Krypton" -- Image SPG202b_0146 -- Pictured (L-R): Melissa Benoist Kara/Supergirl and Chyler Leigh as Alex Danvers -- Photo: Diyah Pera/The CW -- © 2016 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Even though most of the action deals with the emergence of Cadmus and the deadly effects of kryptonite, especially when you stick into a deadly ex-mercenary now named Metallo (Frederick Schmidt), “Last Children of Krypton” mainly focuses on the familial bonds between Supergirl and Superman, and Supergirl and Kara Danvers. With Cat Grant leaving her work and new boss Snapper Carr (Cougar Town‘s Ian Gomez) being just a general pain, Kara ponders leaving National City to be in Metropolis with Superman, who is one of the few people she can be comfortable with in both her superhero and civilian identity. Alex has been Kara’s rock since she landed on Earth, and this conversation drives a rift between them. Most of Robert Rovner and Caitlin Parrish‘s story is dedicated to the reconstruction of this bond and drawing a parallel in the relationship between Superman and J’onn as they go from not trusting each other to connecting over the loss of their homeworlds and finally becoming allies and teaming up in a badass, cross-cutting action sequence from director Glen Winter.


It will be sad to see Tyler Hoechlin though as his two episodes playing Superman have kind of been a masterclass in playing the character, and his bond with Supergirl has just been plain adorable. The cold open where they joke about bullets and punching fists while easily apprehending a pair of armed robbers shows that unlike what Cadmus has been saying that these godlike beings truly care for humanity. But Hoechlin can do serious too in the Kryptonite subplot as he deepens his voice while confronting J’onn about some missing kryptonite that is being used by Cadmus to power up Metallo. Even though he doesn’t curse or drink alcohol and uses the word “jiffy” unironically, Superman in Supergirl  isn’t a naive boy scout, but a veteran superhero, who isn’t afraid to be confrontational. He is competent and cute.

The scariest parts in “Last Children of Krypton” isn’t when Supergirl is knocked out with a kryptonite blast (Her healing factor should be able to deal with that.), but when Kara Danvers is completely ignored by her new boss Snapper Carr after getting her big promotion to reporter last episode. Melissa Benoist does an excellent going from the pretty damn confident Supergirl to the too flustered to say a single word cub reporter. Ian Gomez is in complete control with his portrayal of Carr using a deadpan delivery with a side of passion when he tells Kara that she has basically been handed her job. And, on paper, this makes sense with her sudden promotion from assistant to investigative reporter. Rovner and Parrish don’t fall into the storytelling shortcut trap of quickly making Kara an excellent reporter, but give her a small victory when she hands in a story about the Metallo fight. Carr doesn’t throw her out of the office, but she is very much at the bottom of the food chain and is far from having the perfect dual life of skilled reporter Clark Kent and superhero Superman.

Supergirl -- "The Last Children of Krypton" -- Image SPG202b_0155 -- Pictured (L-R): Tyler Hoechlin as Clark/Superman and David Harewood as Hank Henshaw -- Photo: Diyah Pera/The CW -- © 2016 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved

On a technical level, “Last Children of Krypton” is an improvement from the season premiere with Winter making the action center around hand to hand combat and energy blasts instead of complex aerial maneuvers, which are difficult to do on a CW budget. J’onn mostly stays in his Hank Henshaw form, but Winter breaks out the Martian Manhunter effects at just the right moment for a big action climax or a sad mini monologue. Superman was a baby when Krypton fell, but J’onn had to see his entire people wiped out by the White Martians so he isn’t adverse to using more proactive means to keep his new home, Earth, safe. Just like last week, the best action scenes feature Alex Danvers as she joins the whole cast of Arrow by getting a nice little parkour scene while she is on the run from Cadmus goons, and her reunion scene with Kara is on the field of battle. The mirrored superhero fights in “Last Children of Krypton” have a kind of healing effect on the strained relationships between J’onn and Superman and Alex and Kara. They connect to the episode’s main theme and aren’t just there as some kind of “Well, it’s been almost 40 minutes. Let’s fight.” afterthought.

The only small flaw in “Last Children of Krypton” is the fact that secret government organizations like Cadmus have been done to death in superhero and science fiction shows. However, Rovner and Parrish add a couple new wrinkles to keep this well-worn trope from being boring. First, there is the fact that Cadmus’ goals are very similar to the “good guy” DEO’s goals as they both want to protect Earth from aliens. But the DEO has a more nuanced approached to dealing with extraterrestrials because they have two of them on staff. Next, Cadmus is the polar opposite of Non and Myriad from last season, who were Kryptonian supremacists while Cadmus is alien supremacists. Finally, there is the general mystery angle between who is pulling the strings because we have only seen some unnamed scientists and soldiers so far. It is probably Lena Luthor, but some dialogue about Alex’s dad Jeremiah seems to hint that he may be under their control. So far, Cadmus aren’t the best villains ever, but the parallels to the DEO keep things running for now while the best writing of Supergirl is reserved for the relationships between characters, and Kara struggling in her day job.

The cherry on top of “Last Children of Krypton” is the tearful goodbyes between Cat Grant and Kara as well as Supergirl. There is hugging all around as Cat decides to leave Catco and start on a new, unknown adventure. Her willingness to jump into the unknown acts as an inspiration to Supergirl, who is losing the support of Superman a little earlier than she though and is trying a new job as investigative reporter. These scenes show that there can be great emotional payoff to cultivating relationships between characters instead of focusing on plot twists and gimmicks, and hopefully, the writers of Supergirl will continue to develop the themes of family and friendship while the mystery of Cadmus deepens, and the Kryptonian Mon-El wakes up.

Overall Rating: 9.0

Rebirth Review: Comics Released 10/12

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


ac_cv965_dsAction Comics #965 This Friendly once you accept that the two people at the center of the book, Clark and Lois, aren’t from this world. They’re the same characters from before the New 52, but due to circumstances beyond their control, they’ve got to step into the lives of their now disappeared counter parts (Superman and Lois Lane – there’s already a Clark Kent). It’s an interesting concept, and a story focusing on Lois shows a less super side to their lives.

All-Star Batman #3 is very good,but completely Unfriendly to new readers. If you’ve been reading the series so far, however, you’ll be fine.

Batgirl and the Birds Of Prey #3 This really isn’t a bad comic, provided that you’re at least partly familiar with the previous events – specifically why there’s a Oracle and a Batgirl, because that crucial detail is missing this issue, which ales this decidedly Unfriendly.

Deathstroke #4 I have a feeling that this story will be far better read as a trade, but even if you were to start here, you’ll find it Friendly enough.

hjglc_cv5_open_order_varDetective Comics #942 The finale of a multi-part, multi-comic crossover that ends strongly, but it’s an Unfriendly place for new readers

Gotham Academy: Second Semester #2 Having no idea what this series is about, the second issue was actually a lot more Friendly than the first for me. An entertaining comic that focuses on several students at a Gotham boarding house who’ve set up a detective club – think in a similar vein to Scooby Doo. I didn’t expect to like this.

Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps #6 There’s two ways to look at this comic, an depending on how you approach it will approach it’s accessibility. If you just want to read a story about Hal Jordan being awesome and kicking ass, then this is the place to be; but if you want to know why he’s kicking ass beyond the fact he has to stop the Yellow Lanterns, you’re a little out of luck. I’m not giving this a rating for that reason.

New Super-Man #4 You can jump on board here and be able to have a half-decent Friendly comic, just about, but it’ll be so much better if you start at least an issue ago.

nsm_cv4_dsRed Hood And The Outlaws #3 Is actually more Friendly than the last issue. There are moments that may not make sense, but by and large… you can jump right in here and enjoy the story.

Suicide Squad #4 Is a chaotic mess that somehow still explains just about what you need to make the fourth issue Friendly. That Suicide Squad #4 is also hugely entertaining in a popcorn action flick kinda way is a pleasant bonus.

Supergirl #2 Another comic this week that falls right in the middle of the Friendly/Unfriendly line. There are aspects that welcome newer readers, and just as many that will cause confusion. We’re only two issues in, so if you’re even a little curious about Supergirl, pick both issues up.

Superwoman #3 The advantage to reading as many of the DC comics as I do for this feature means that I tend to forget what happened in previous issues. Rather than going back and rereading them to catch myself up, I use my poor memory to judge  how accessible the comics are. Unfortunately, in cases such as this fls_cv8_dswith Superwoman I don’t recall too much of the previous issues, making this comic a tad Unfriendly.

The Flash #8 Although this wraps up the current Gospeed focused arc, there’s actually a decent amount of the comic that’s Friendly to new readers, and the set up for the next tale is also well done. You could do much worse than starting here with the series.

Wonder Woman #8 An interlude into the current stories that delves a little into the past of Dr. Minerva. It’s an interesting foray into the past, but not the most Friendly place to start (that’s not an unfriendly rating, but rather a friendly comic that doesn’t feature Wonder Woman at all).


Supergirl S2E1: The Adventures of Supergirl Recap


Season 2 of Supergirl kicked off with a bang last night on its new home The CW. Any fans who were skeptical about how the change in networks would effect their beloved show can relax.

Fans and newcomers to the show were treated to a new intro and that classic CW look. Always ready to keep the viewers on their feet there was a space pod crash and a mystery Kryptonian crash landed on earth.

In the interim between season 1 and season 2 the clandestine alien hunting team have moved into newer digs. No longer underground and with a little more autonomy, the lovable laughable Winn is now a member of the team. He’s their tech guy and it was a clever way to keep him on the show since it looks like Kara won’t be spending much time at the office season.

Supergirl -- "The Last Children of Krypton" -- Image SPG202a_0016 -- Pictured (L-R): Melissa Benoist Kara/Supergirl and Tyler Hoechlin as Clark/Superman -- Photo: Robert Falconer/The CW -- © 2016 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved

We also get to meet Superman and see the big cousin, little cousin ribbing and love that we needed. Having Clark on the show means Kara has someone, like her to talk about her Kryptonian problems. The Superman intro was delightfully campy, complete with slow motion running and shirt ripping to reveal the giant house of El crest.

The villain this time around is kind of ambiguous. Lex Luthor may or may not be trying to take his sister out and he’s willing to put all of National City at risk to do it. Supergirl and Superman team up throughout the episode and prove that two heads are better than one. I just hope that this mash up does not turn into the Superman show with Kara as a side kick.

Everyone’s favorite mogul and Kara mentor is back and still being the awesome example of a boss chick that we love. She is putting pressure on Kara to chose her next career at Cat Co. because she’s too good to just be an assistant. A good quarter of the episode is Kara trying to choose her path and Cat trying to lovingly but, bluntly get her to make a choice. In the end Kara chooses to be a reporter which Cat knew she would chose from the second she met her. That’s why Cat was so hard on her. She wanted to polish the diamond in the rough. There’s something refreshing about seeing them interact. We get to watch an older successful woman mentoring a young woman just starting out. She’s not trying to turn her into a clone, she’s trying to help her be the best she can be. So often in media we see women tearing other women down, exhibiting a sort of Highlander (there can be only one) mentality, or lamenti about boys. Their relationship is the kind that little girls need to see because it’s an image that is lacking in most media & depictions of female relationships.

clarkandkaraSpeaking of relationships, Jimmy and Kara are trying to make the relationship thing work. But, it’s not going as well as planned. clearly these two love each other and we all love to ‘ship them but, the timing isn’t right and Kara isn’t as into it as she could be. There is this great moment where Kara breaks the news to Jimmy and he acts like a human being. I phrase is like that because so often men take it the wrong (aggressive) way when women friend zone them. When Kara tells him that she just wants to be friends because she needs time to figure out who she is, how she can be Kara and Supergirl and, how she can manage a career he accepts it and supports her instead of telling her why she is wrong and pushing a romantic relationship on her. There was no saltiness and he kept his sulking to himself. It was a nice example for the young men watching, a feminist flag saying that women are not property and they don’t owe you a romantic relationship .

Another nice example for the men watching was Superman himself. When Kara asks for his advice about balancing it all he gives it to her. He doesn’t mansplain or tell her what to do instead he tells her how he did it and that she can figure it out. He treats her as a person instead of an object. He listens instead of ordering and, helps instead of sowing seeds of doubt.

Lena provides an antiCat for the series, she’s a strong woman but, she’s a variation on the most common women in power trope. She’s ruthless, cold and kind of heartless. She doesn’t even bat an eye at shooting a mama who was sent by her brother to kill her, even though Superman or Supergirl could have taken him down. But, the shows  take on this trope makes her relatable. She’s end fighting for her place so long she knows she’s alone and somehow it comes off less sexist and cliched and more complex and real.

With the threat to Lena neutralized and another unconscious Kryptonian pod person in the mix, Clark decides to stick around. The last few minutes of the show gave us the birth of Metallo who I’m assuming will be one of this seasons villians. Pod man (or should I just call him Valor? Because, it’s not like y’all weren’t thinking the same damn thing) will hopefully join the fight and I’m hoping the hero injection on the show doesn’t over power the She-ro the show is supposed to be about.

Overall this was a great start on the new network. It was serving up a little Smallville magic and I am hoping the magic continues. Supergirl is one of the few truly Girl powered (and empowering) shows on right now and, I am hoping that the writers continue to do right by her because she deserves it.

Overall Rating: 9.7

TV Review: Supergirl S2 E1 “Adventures of Supergirl” is a Crossroads for Kara

Supergirl -- "The Last Children of Krypton" -- Image SPG202a_0016 -- Pictured (L-R): Melissa Benoist Kara/Supergirl and Tyler Hoechlin as Clark/Superman -- Photo: Robert Falconer/The CW -- © 2016 The CW Network, LLC. All Rights Reserved

Much of the press surrounding the season 2 premiere of Supergirl has been centered around Teen Wolf‘s Tyler Hoechlin guest starring as Superman, and he does turn in the best performance as the Man of Steel since the last Christopher Reeve. However, “Adventures of Supergirl” is about a turning point in Supergirl’s (Melissa Benoist) life as she must decide what job she is taking at Catco, whether she wants to date James Olsen (Mechad Brooks), and basically choose what kind of person she wants to be. Sure, a mercenary with a British accent and a name that is familiar to comic book nerds shows up to wreak havoc, and there is some intrigue from Lena Luthor. But writers Andrew Kreisberg, Jessica Queller, and Greg Berlanti focus the main brunt of the plot on Supergirl’s “coming of age” and ably position Superman’s guest apperance as both a family member and someone she can aspire to be. It’s the bedrock of a pretty overstuffed premiere that also features a subplot about tension between Superman and Martian Manhunter (David Harewood) over the DEO keeping kryptonite as insurance against any rogue Kryptonians.

“Adventures of Supergirl” is a major episode in Supergirl’s continuing character arc, and Melissa Benoist shows some nice acting range as she goes from smiling while saving a plane with Superman to stuttering about filling out an Internet quiz to pick her new job at Catco. And even though she isn’t Cat Grant’s (Calista Flockhart) assistant any more, Kara is a little unsure of herself as she and Superman (in disguise as Clark Kent) investigate Lena Luthor (Katie McGrath) and in some of her interactions with Cat. However, she has never been more confident as Supergirl as she smiles while speed fixing L-Corp (formerly LexCorp) Tower and crack jokes about changing Superman’s diapers on Krypton to a family of bystanders she rescues. When Supergirl shields civilians or bullets or flies to save an airplane, it makes you believe in things like truth and justice. And this extends to her civilian life as Kara Danvers as she channels some of her life as Supergirl into an impassioned plea to Cat Grant to become a reporter at Catco. (Also, it’s the perfect job for a superhero, and you can get “exclusive scoops”. Just ask Peter Parker or Lois Lane.)


“Adventures of Supergirl” also features a trio of wide-ranging guest performances for the earlier mentioned Hoechlin, Flockhart, and McGrath. Hoechlin’s plays Superman as a human being, not an icon, and he channels the competent, mature reporter and hero that has settled down with Lois Lane as written in Post-Crisis stories by John Byrne, Dan Jurgens, Mark Waid (His investigative reporting in Superman Birthright especially.), and the DC Animated Universe. The writers give him just a dash of cheesiness in his dialogue to satisfy fond memories of “bumbling reporter” Clark Kent, and director Glen Winter frames the big “S” front and center in the action scenes and establishing shots before cutting to him making a dry quip or shaking DEO soldiers’ hands. Superman is a family man with godlike powers, and Hoechlin and Benoist have a cheerful chemistry with Superman giving her helpful tips about being a more efficient superhero while Supergirl tells him stories about Krypton. I’m glad that they will have a few more episodes to explore their relationship, grow together, and share more triumphant high fives and smiles.


Unfortunately, Cat Grant’s time as a main cast member of Supergirl has drawn to a close, but “Adventures of Supergirl” is hell of a curtain call for her. Kreisberg, Queller, and Berlanti build off the friendlier relationship that she and Kara developed at the close of Season 1 while still keeping some of her trademark sniping for good measure, like her constant reminders of the exact time Kara has to choose a job at Catco. Cat gets some of the most perceptive writing in the episode as she remarks that Supergirl’s beliefs are what make her a hero, not her abilities. Cat also gets a tiny bit sentimental when she talks about Kara’s potential to grow from an awkward, unsure assistant to a confident woman because she sees her drive to succeed in Kara. Flockhart excels at playing the mentor much more than the angry boss even though her one-liners are sharp as ever.

Finally, Katie McGrath brings an otherworldly presence to the role of Lena Luthor. Her calculated line delivery makes her initially seem like a femme fatale played by Eva Green, and Clark Kent doesn’t trust her, but she is really a woman, who wants to make something for herself apart from her family. She isn’t Lex Luthor’s plant, but a woman with a vision even though we don’t get to see her business acumen in this episode. Lena does end up being the one to take out Corben, and Kreisberg, Queller, and Berlanti do a twist on the Superman/Luthor dynamic by writing a favorable article about her and her company L-Corp because it’s the “truth”. But from the slow, measured ways that McGrath delivers Lena dialogue, and the “all too easy” ending of this episode, she may end up being a villain yet.


Despite strong performances and inspirational themes, “Adventures of Supergirl” does have its shortcomings. The lack of budget in the move from CBS to the CW definitely shows with Winter’s quick cuts to not expose the fact that Supergirl and Superman are flying against a generic cityscape green screen. The sad richness that David Harewood brought to his voice performance as the Martian Manhunter in Season One is also distorted in the sound mix. Besides these technical hiccups, John Corben is a pretty one-dimensional villain of the week as your standard run of the mill merc with a drone that looks bought off eBay. (He becomes immensely cooler in the stinger though.) “Adventures of Supergirl” is also juggling a ton of plots and subplots, and major one of them (Jimmy/Kara romance) doesn’t get the kind of attention and lingering camera shots it got last season as Kara decides to just be friends with James. It does make sense that she wouldn’t have time for a romantic relationship at such a transitional time in her life though.

A villain of the week and some special effects issues aside, “Adventures of the Supergirl” is a sparkling example what an inspiring show Supergirl is and features some excellent character chemistry between Melissa Benoist’s Supergirl, Tyler Hoechlin’s Superman, and Calista Flockhart’s Cat Grant. The episode dedicates itself to establishing and shifting the character of Supergirl while setting up a couple of mysteries to explored down the road. Lena Luthor is especially captivating thanks to Katie McGrath

Overall Rating: 8.5

Around the Tubes

Superman Rebirth Variant Cover by Andy ParkWe’re still recovering from New York Comic Con and still have tons of news to come!

While you wait for that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Jewish Telegraphic Agency – Comics hero Frank Miller wants a Superman who ‘confronts his Jewish roots’ – That could be interesting.

Quartz – A South African graphic novel series wants to change how Africans think of superheroes  – Need to check this out.

CBR – Spider-Man Spinoff News Coming Soon, Says Sony Chairman – Anyone want to still see this happen?

ICv2 – ‘We Sold at Least 185,000 Unique Tickets – Congrats!


Around the Tubes Reviews

Talking Comics – All-New Wolverine #13

Rebirth Review: Comics Released 10/5

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s Rebirth Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series, with more consideration given for the specific issue being read when it comes to the final rating than the series overall. You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I have a memory like a sieve and sometimes forget to pick them up. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


bm_cv8_dsAquaman #8 – Unless you have been reading at least one of the previous issues, you’re going to be a little lost as to why the events of the comic are happening. It’s just a tad on the Unfriendly side, but it’s worth picking up nonetheless.

Batman #8 continues the Night Of The Monster Men crossover that’s running through this series, Detective Comics and  Nightwing. It’s an Unfriendly jumping on point, but the story’s growing on me and will probably be worth reading in a trade a few months down the line.

Cyborg #2 takes a lot of time introducing us to the villain. The effect of this, for the reader, is the same as a prolonged recap page as the events of  the previous issue are eventually touched upon. This allows you to really appreciate the events of the comic, making it incredibly Friendly.

Green Arrow #8 will be fairly Friendly for fans of the TV show that just reappeared on our screens, as it opens after Ollie has washed up on an island of some kind. There’s not a lot of background, but seeing as I only remembered why he’d washed up there as  I was writing this blurb and not while I was reading the comic, the lack of background info isn’t a big deal.

Green Lanterns #8 – Part one of a new story in one of DC’s most consistently accessible for new readers is, obviously, a Friendly comic. It’s also very good.

gls_cv8_open_order_varHarley Quinn #5 isn’t always my cup of tea, but as far as the series goes this isn’t a bad place to start up for new readers. Friendly.

Justice League #5 I’m assuming if you’re reading this you’ve a fair idea who the Justice League is. However, much like the first issue, you’re thrown into the middle of something with little explanation – but because there’s no reference to previous issues, this is a Friendly comic. We’re all on the same page when the comic opens.

Midnighter And Apollo #1 is as Friendly a place as you’re likely to find within the post Rebirth line of comics.

Nightwing #5 if you read what I wrote for Batman #8, then just repeat it here.

Superman #8 kicks off a new story arc, and because the story throws you inn the deep end right away, it’s a Friendly comic. Just don’t expect much light shed on the setting right away.

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