Tag Archives: superman

Preview: Superman #39

Superman #39

(W) Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason (A) Barry Kitson (CA) Chris Burnham
RATED T
In Shops: Jan 17, 2018
SRP: $2.99

What would it be like to fly with the Man of Steel? Some very special children find out as Superman fulfills some unique wishes.

DC Rebirth Roundup: Jan 10th’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pic up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


Apologies for the brevity this week; I’ve been feeling less than stellar this week and put off reading these comics to beyond the last minute.

HJGLC_Cv36_dsAction Comics #995. Superman traveled backward in time to witness the destruction of Krypton, but screwed up the timeline and Krypton didn’t blow up. So time traveler Booster Gold went to stop him, and now they’re trying to escape. Or, rather, they did escape, but not alone… this Friendlyish comic can be read without much of a recap. But.. it isn’t great. 6/10

Detective Comics #972 Batman has been rehabilitating Clayface, quite successuflly, but the Victim Syndicate just drove Clayface back to his villainous ways via pain and the removal of his inhibitor bracelet (that kept him human, and somehow by being human in appearance he was less like a monster). Chaotic, Friendly, and not that bad. 6.75/10

Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps #36 The Guardians have been kidnapped by the Controllers, who are using the Guardian’s life forces to create new Controllers (the two races share the same origin point). Hal Jordan, Kyle Raynor, Guy Gardner and Jon Stewart have mounted a four man rescue mission. The conclusion is pretty Friendly for all. 7.2/10

New Super-Man #19 A day in the life of Laney Lan. It’s Friendly, but not worth TNS_Cv19_dsreading. 5/10

Red Hood and the Outlaws #18 Bizarro is no longer as thick as a plank, thanks to a little case of death and rebirth, and is creating incredibly tech for the outlaws in their war on crime in Gotham City. The issue is Friendly enough – and I say that as somebody who didn’t read the last issue (or forgot he did). 7/10

Suicide Squad #33 The first part of a new arc. which is typically the best place to jump on board with any series, and this is no exceptionPrevous events are utterly irrelevant to this comic, making this nice and Friendly6.5/10

Superwoman #18 It’s the final issue. So…. not the best place to jump in.

Wonder Woman #38 Another series that sees the first part of a new story kicking off, which means that, once again, this is a Friendly comic. And enjoyable to boot. 7/10

Titans #19 The Titans saved the world, but it almost went wrong. This issue starts dealing with the fallout, and it is Friendly. 7/10

 


That’s a wrap for this week folks. I’ll see you next time!

DC Rebirth Roundup: Jan 3rd’s Comics

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pic up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

BM_Cv38_dsBatman #38 A standalone story that’s nothing overly special, but is still worth a read all the same. Yes, it’s Friendly, assuming you’re aware who Batman is, and that he’s engaged to Catwoman. 6.5/10

Cyborg #20 Cyborg has been “cured” of his technological enhancements by a magical rhino horn that grants wishes at a cost (because why not?). But just when Cyborg needs his technology the most to free a group of children from a gang in Africa exploiting them for diamond mining, he’s bereft thanks to his wish. This issue is a little Unfriendly, but it’s a solid conclusion to. 7/10

Deathstroke #27 Welcome back to the brilliant yet almost impenetrable series that, I am convinced, would read much better in trade or as a binge. As much as I enjoy this series, the intrigue and quality of the  twists and turns wouldn’t survive a roundup post. Unfriendly, but so good. 8/10

Green Arrow #36 As good as this issue is, there’s really no coherent recap I can provide that will adequately summarize the previous events for you; you might pickup some details, but… yeah. This is just a touch Unfriendly a place to start reading, but you might want to consider a trade or two. 7.2/10

Green Lantarns #36 The Moloids, an alien population from a dead world have found refuge on a new planet. But their presence isn’t sitting well with the locals, and the two species are in a mixing pot of anger and misunderstandings that culminated in a murder of a high profile citizen. With the high priest of the Moloids taking blame for the murder, the truth was revealed to Simon Baz that a group called the Red Tide was responsible. And guess what Simon’s new love interest is a member of? This issue is Friendly, and pretty solid. 7.3/10

SM Cv38_dsNightwing #36 Nightwing was shot in the shoulder by the one cop he trusts after she was coerced into doing so by the Judge – a man who has history with Dick Grayson, and is seemingly able to convince people to give into their darkest desires. This issue is Friendly, and shows a more intense Nightwing than we’ve seen in some time. 7.4/10

Superman #38 If you want to start this series, frankly it’s best to wait till next issue. This is the penultimate chapter of a crossover between several different series, and thus Unfriendly for those looking to start reading Superman7/10

 



That’s a wrap for this week folks. I’ll see you next time!

Wonder Woman, Superman, and Batman Get Premium Format Figures from Sideshow

Sideshow has announced three new DC Heroes collectibles coming soon!

See the preview announcement and RSVP for more information on the Wonder Woman Premium Format™ Figure.

See the preview announcement and RSVP for more information on the Superman Premium Format™ Figure.

See the preview announcement and RSVP for more information on the Batman Premium Format™ Figure.

Preview: Superman: The Atomic Age Sundays, Vol. 3 (1956–1959)

Superman: The Atomic Age Sundays, Vol. 3 (1956–1959)

Alvin Schwartz; Bill Finger (w) • Wayne Boring (a) • Pete Poplaski (c)

Superman’s newspaper comic strips are among the most rare of all Superman collectibles. This comprehensive series helps remedy that gap in Superman history by bringing back into print every one of the Sunday newspaper strips. The Man of Steel stars in seven classic adventures as the 1950s “Atomic Age” comes to a close. Two of the stories are original to the newspaper strip, while five were alternate versions of tales that were simultaneously published in the regular comic books. One of the featured adaptations is “Superman Versus the Futuremen,” written by Batman co-creator Bill Finger, which retells Superman’s origin. This concluding volume of Superman’s Atomic Age Sundays reprints all strips from July 1, 1956 to October 11, 1959.

HC • FC • $49.99 • 184 pages • 9.25” x 12” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-061-1

Review: Superman #38

With no other choice left, the Batman of Tomorrow brings in the Titans of Tomorrow to take on today’s Teen Titans-as the life of Superman’s son hangs in the balance! See the return of future Superman Conner Kent, Wonder Woman Cassie Sandsmark and Bart Allen Flash in the final battle of this epic crossover.

The “Sons of Tomorrow” storyline wraps up with this issue that feels both cool and falls short. Writers Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason bring a lot together as Tim Drake Batman, now calling himself Savior, continues his pursuit of Superboy while others either help him or attempt to help Damian and Superboy. On paper, it sounds great, but the storyline introduces way too much and leaves it hanging.

Part of that is the future Titans who play a bigger role in the story and when they eventually get to the present, there’s no pushback at all. Everyone seems to just role with whomever these folks are and there’s very little reaction that there’s these future versions of some of DC’s biggest names. Maybe that’ll come in the follow up to it all. There’s also some slip-ups like when Damian calls Drake Savior, a name that’s never uttered by Drake to him, so not quite sure what to call him.

The art though is impressive. There’s a few spreads by Sergio Davila that are amazing in how things are presented, especially when Savior or the future Titans are getting pulled through time. Davila is helped with the inks by Vicente Cifuentes and color by Gabe Eltaeb. The time travel scenes especially are impressive with the placement of characters, the 3-D aspect of the tube they’re traveling through. It’s some really solid art that stands out in the issue.

The ending is a little flat at times. There’s a lot that just happens and there’s not much reaction to it. We’ll see if there’s follow up to it but on it’s own, there’s just something missing. The overall story is solid and hopefully a prologue addresses some of my concerns but what started out great ends with a meh.

Story: Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason Art: Sergio Davila
Ink: Vicente Cifuentes Color: Gabe Eltaeb Letterer: Rob Leigh
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

DC Rebirth: Recap and Review Comics Released 12/27

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pic up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

 

Action Comics #994 Guest starring Booster Gold, who gives a Friendly enough recap at the beginning of this book for those new to the series or returning after a few issues, this issue is easy enough to jump onto, even if it doesn’t do anything too interesting. 6/10

DTC_Cv971_dsDetective Comics #971 The Victim Syndicate, a group of formerly innocent people caught in the crossfire between Batman and his war on crime have taken over Arkham Asylum, and they have Clayface trapped inside (Clayface being one of Batman’s team as they’re working on a cure for his condition, he’s able to remain human with a bracelet) . There’s a lot of action this issue, which lends a Friendly tone as it limits the plot movement… but it’s not the best issue of the week. 6.5/10

The Flash #37 The Rogues are running a criminal empire right under Flash’s nose in Iron Hieghts prison, and he has no idea. As far as jumping on points go you could do worse, but as long as you’re okay with putting the small things together as you go along then this issue is Friendly.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #35 The Guardians have been kidnapped by the Controllers who are harvesting the Guardians life energy to produce new Controllers, and Hal Jordan, Guy Gardner, Kyle Raynor and Jon Stewart are going to mount a four man rescue mission. This is a Friendly comic that’s just pure fun. 7.25/10hjglc35.jpg

The Hellblazer #17 The second part in an ongoing arc, of which I missed the first so have no recap for you. Thankfully, this is a Friendly issue that’s quite easy to follow along with. 7/10

Suicide Squad #32 The finale of a story that saw the return of two Rick Flags (one who was presumed dead several issues ago, who is also the grandson of the other) while the Squad is fighting a space monster. It’s chaotic, well drawn, and Friendly if you just go for the art and action sequences. 7/10

Teen Titans #15 Part three of an inter-series crossover that concludes in Superman #38, this won’t be an ideal jumping on point. It’s good, but Unfriendly7/10

Wonder Woman #37 Darksied is killing the children of Zeus to absorb their power to grow stronger (apparently he was a baby), and his daughter had been working with Wonder Woman’s brother (yup) to find the demigods. Then Wonder Woman got blindsided by an attack and Zeus showed up to end it all. The issue is Friendly, but it’s utter crap. 4/10

That’s a wrap for this week folks. I’ll see you next time!

DC Rebirth: Recap and Review Comics Released 12/20

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. You’ll also notice that each comic will get a rating that falls on Graphic Policy’s typical ten point scale, which is there to help you pick between issues if you only want to check out one or two.

Not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often), or I really can’t bring myself to pic up the issue. If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


 

Aquaman #31 If you’re thinking of starting this series (and you should) then you could do a lot worse than here. Indeed, if this is your first issue, then you’ll find a recap more than you’ll find at the beginning of the comic will rob you of a couple of interesting moments that those reading the comic will already be aware of. Needless to say, this is Friendly7.5/10

BM_Cv37_ds

Batman #37 You know Batman and Catwoman are engaged? Great, you’re caught up. Now go enjoy a wonderful story. 9/10 (Yes, it’s Friendly)

Batwoman #10 Having been caught by Scarecrow and subjected to some mental torture and experimentation Batwoman and another prisoner, Colony Prime, escaped. Now, Batwoman has finally cornered Scarecrow while still under the influence of his fear toxin. Unfortunately, this is closer to Unfriendly that not, but that shouldn’t discourage you from at least thinking about this issue. 6.75/10

Green Lanterns #37 Following on from a story where the Lanterns relocated a dying planet’s population to Ungaran, an already populated planet, at the behest of the Ungaran regent, this issue sees the Lanterns return to said planet to help quell an uprising because of those relocated people. A Friendly issue that skirts racism with a less than subtle story. 7.75/10

Justice League #35 Although this is part two in The People Verses The Justice League, it’s almost a better place to start than the last issue. Friendly, and not too bad a story that looks at the public images of superheroes. 7/10

NTW_Cv35_ds

Nightwing #35 The start of a new arc is, once again, a great (an Friendly)  place for you to jump into  this series. Nightwing is forging his own path in Bludhaven, away from Batman and Bruce Wayne, and his struggles to establish himself in a city that doesn’t want him have been quite entertaining. Nightwing’s at his best when he’s against the wall, and he’s against the wall here. 8/10

Superman #37 The first part of the story that continues in Super Sons #11 (and you can guess which I read first…). Obviously, this is a Friendly issue, and probably should be read before Super Sons #117/10

Super Sons #11 The second part of a story that crosses multiple series, and one I don’t remember reading the first part of. Despite that, this is still a pretty Friendly issue that touches on Damian’s touchy relationship with the Teen Titans and captures how he and Super Boy relate to each other in a few short pages. 7/10

Trinity #16 You know who the title characters are, and you probably know – or at least have an idea of – who Deadshot is. You’ll find this single issue story Friendly6.75/10

 

That’s a wrap for this week folks. I’ll see you next time!

Preview: Superman #37

Superman #37

(W) Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason (A) Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza (CA) Ivan Reis
RATED T
In Shops: Dec 20, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“SUPER SONS OF TOMORROW” part one! The four-part crossover between Superman, the Super Sons and the Teen Titans starts here! The Batman of Tomorrow travels to the present to prevent a cataclysmic disaster before it happens, revealing that Superboy will soon be responsible for the death of millions. But Superman will do anything to protect his son… and the Batman of Tomorrow is unwavering in his resolve to take down the Boy of Steel. Don’t miss a clash of titanic proportion in the opening chapter of this game-changing story!

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