Tag Archives: superman

Knight Models Adds Superman, Lexcorp, and Doomsday to their DC and Batman Miniature Games

Knight Models has revealed new miniatures for their DC Universe Miniature Game and Batman Miniature Game.

Superman joins the DC Universe Miniature Game with a version that allows you to make the traditional character as well as Kingdom Come and Red Son. Also, for those that pre-order Superman before May 30th, they’ll receive a free World’s Finest Card that teams Superman up with Batman.

The DC Universe Miniature Game also gets some villains in the form of General Zod, Faora, and Nam-Ek, as well as Doomsday. The game also gets some markers to go along with your Red Son Superman.

The World’s Finest team up is also the company’s first Battle Pack! Battle Packs are bite-sized expansions for the Batman Miniature Game, containing new crews, rules, traits, and options. Battle Pack add even more depth to your favorite tabletop game, allowing you to explore alternative timelines, character variants and stories from the archives of Batman, his allies, and his enemies.

The rules presented in this Battle Pack are completely official. Remember, however, that models of the Legend rank may not be allowed in organized play games, such as a Batmatch, unless specified otherwise.

In this Battle Pack you will find new rules representing the characters and events from the iconic World’s Finest mini-series. Here you will find new character cards, representing two powerful teams for the Batman Miniature Game, as well as all the special rules you need to use them.

The Batman Miniature Game gets a new gang with the LexCorp Industries pack as well as the LexCorp Heavy Trooper. The gang also gets some markers to help you keep track of things.

You can order all of them now.

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TV Review: Supergirl S2E22 “Nevertheless She Persisted” has Kick-Ass Action and Human Emotion

Supergirl‘s Season 2 finale “Nevertheless She Persisted” opens up a potent can of whup ass with a no holds barred throwdown between Supergirl and Superman, who is being controlled by Rhea with silver kryptonite that makes Kara look like General Zod, courtesy of veteran Arrow and Smallvile director Glen Winter. And it has a Battle of Pelennor Fields-esque second act with White Martians, a Superman and Martian Manhunter team-up, and even Mon-El busting out some kung fu to defeat the Daxamites. However, where this episode really shines is how writers Robert Rovner, Caitlin Parrish, Jessica Queller, and Andrew Kreisberg,  and actor Melissa Benoist show how far Kara Danvers has come along as a woman, reporter, and hero. She’s not afraid to make the hard choice and irradiating the atmosphere with lead to make the Daxamites go away but feels terrible about having to send her boyfriend Mon-El away before he dies. Her grief comes out in teary, silent close-ups of Benoist as she flies in the twilight and wishes there was some way she could be with Mon-El. Also, having a nice trial by combat between Supergirl and Rhea is an excellent main plot point.

And this is where Cat Grant is kind of perfect in a more dialed down performance from Calista Flockhart even though she makes some great, leaning on the fourth quips about never seeing Star Wars to Winn and Kara. She gives Kara the pep talk of all pep talks by praising her investigative reporting while giving her constructive criticism about her writing style. Then, Cat hits what is honestly the thematic core of Supergirl as a TV show: women can be emotionally vulnerable and still fight on. And this goes for all the women of Supergirl, including the bad guys. Rhea is a terrible, cowardly tyrant, but she still has love for Mon-El even as she collapses in lead dust. On the other hand, Lillian Luthor will do whatever it takes to protect the world from aliens, but she regrets being so negative towards Lena while she was growing up and straining their relationship.

Even more so than the MacGuffin/mind control/Myriad season 1 finale, Supergirl Season 2’s finale is a war story. Most of the shooting is done in the dark, but Winter occasionally shows shots of buildings, fountains, and windows being caught in the crossfire of powerful aliens from the Superman vs. Supergirl battle in the beginning to Supergirl vs. Rhea and finally the all out Martian/human/Kryptonian/Daxamite battle royale. But unlike its higher budget cousin, Man of Steel, “Nevertheless She Persisted” consciously shows the heroes helping every day people, like Martian Manhunter carrying civilians out of harm’s way or Superman protecting them with his freeze breath. Superman and Martian Manhunter have a truly epic moment when they say “Stronger together” in their native tongues before giving us one of the coolest superhero team-ups in TV history.

But they get emotional stories too with Superman playing a supporting role even though Tyler Hoechlin has leading man charisma, and you can tell why Cat Grant has a crush on Clark Kent. In a sparring session, she opens up to him about her fear of losing Mon-El if she activates Lillian Luthor’s fail safe, and he empathizes with his fear of losing Lois. Except for when he’s under the influence of silver kryptonite (Which I didn’t know was a thing), Superman is kind, compassionate, and a team player. And the writers of Supergirl use him in small doses so he doesn’t overshadow Kara and the main supporting players’ arcs.

They don’t spend a lot of time onscreen together thanks to the frantic flying and rushing to fight Rhea and the Daxamites, but “Nevertheless She Persisted’s” writers manage to get a few great scenes out of Kara and Alex’s interactions. Their bond as sisters has been this season’s bedrock and even enhanced the romantic relationship between Alex and Maggie, which gets a bit of an upgrade in this episode. Alex nurses her back to health in the Fortress of Solitude and then later on thanks her for helping her come out as lesbian earlier in the season although she was struggling to be herself. Kara is definitely thinking about Mon-El as she flies and broods above National City, but her last great interaction is with Alex, the woman who she inspires and is inspired by in turn.

Supergirl is a TV show about women of action who also have rich emotional lives, and when the writers strike that balance between those two things (Instead of following Mon-El down a douchy rabbit hole), it can be a great genre show as “Nevertheless She Persisted” (And a great Cat Grant speech.) demonstrates. Supergirl Season 2 has definitely been a rocky ride, but by doubling down on the relationships between female characters and villains, it stuck the landing while leaving some threads for next season like Lillian Luthor being free as a bird, yet another pod being sent from Krypton, and perhaps a romance between Kara and Lena Luthor.

Overall Rating: 8.50

Pop! Movies: Justice League in August

Pop! Movies: Justice League features a few members of the DC comics superhero team.

From the upcoming film Justice League releasing November 17, 2017! Batman, Aquaman, Cyborg, The Flash, Superman, and Wonder Woman are now joining the Funko team!

Pop! Movies: Justice League are out this August from Funko.

 

 

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Preview: Superman #23

Superman #23

(W) Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason (A) Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza (CA) Ryan Sook
RATED T
In Shops: May 17, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“BLACK DAWN” part two! The mysterious force behind Superman’s defeat reveals itself. Superboy wonders what is so great about Truth, Justice and the American way. Will Jon turn against his father?

DC Rebirth Recap And Review For Comics Released 5/10

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series. Some assumptions will be made regarding familiarity with some of the bigger named heroes (for example, I’m assuming you know who Bruce Wayne is) when it comes to accessibility.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


Action Comics #979 Honestly, you don’t need a recap. This is a Friendly issue with an arc starting here.

All-Star Batman #10 A story told from Alfred’s point of view. gloriously Friendly, and frankly very good. This is well worth you checking out as both the main and backup story start fresh here, and with Scott Snyder writing it… you can’t go wrong.

Batgirl And The Birds Of Prey #10 Wrapping up the battle with Blackbird, the story can be read without anything else, so in that case it’s Friendly, but you might not want to.

Detective Comics #956 Gotham is under siege by the enemy of the League Of Assassins, the League Of Shadows, and Batman and his allies had just been captured by Lady Shiva, only for Orphan to single handedly take on the entire League Of Shadows to free them. Last issue saw the Batfamily stand in a heroically comic book pose before getting ready to take on Lady Shiva. This is the concluding chapter, but it’s still Friendly enough for you to start with. Oh, Clayface is a hero now.

Hal Jordan And The Green Lantern Corps #20 Despite being the third part of this arc, there’s a Friendly introduction courtesy of John Stewart. I really don’t need to give you too much more, so I won’t.

Justice League Of America #6 Finishes of the battle with Aegeus. It’s really Unfriendly and one to avoid unless you start at the beginning of the arc.

New Super-Man #11 Kong Kenan was artificially granted a power set very similar to Clark Kent’s by a government sponsored organization, and he became the New Super-Man, a member of the Justice League of China (who just got their newest member in a purple speedster). In order to unlock those powers Kenan has begun learning martial arts, and his interactions are actually quite amusing.  This is another first part, and it’s quite Friendly.

Red Hood And The Outlaws #10 I have no idea what’s happening here because I don’t remember the previous issue. I suppose that makes this Unfriendly.

Suicide Squad #17 So General Zod is in the Suicide Squad now. Go figure. Funnily enough, this is still a Friendly comic (assuming you know roughly who the Squad is).

Superwoman #10 kicks off the “Rediscovery” story arc and since it’s the first part you’re pretty good to start here, so this one’s rated Friendly.

Titans #11 Deathstroke is back! Despite his long history with the team, that I am utterly unaware of (I have read exactly 11 Titans comics, which you’ll notice is the number of this issue), I was still able to follow along nicely here. It helps being the first part in a new arc, but this is a Friendly issue full of goodness.

Wonder Woman #22 I may be writing this feature, but I almost went looking for a recap of the issue myself. It’s frustrating, because I’m genuinely enjoying this series – or I would if not for the dual narratives that are just similar enough to get muddled in my brain, making this Unfriendly for me.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank #4 (Black Mask Studios) – This series is one that has taken awhile to finish, but so far it has been worth the wait. Hopefully #5 follows shortly after!

The Flash #22 (DC Comics) – It is so far so good for The Button, and I’m excited to see how this all pans out and sets up the big fall event by Johns.

Superman #23 (DC Comics) – One of my favorite Rebirth books just keeps getting better. This looks to be another Jon heavy issue, which is okay with me.

The Mighty Thor #19 (Marvel) – Aaron has been doing a fantastic job on Thor for years, and this run is no different. I have enjoyed the epic galactic war and more Quentin Quire is never a bad thing.

Batman #23 (DC Comics) – Now that The Button is ending in this weeks The Flash, this book gets back to the aftermath of Bane. I’m looking forward to how everything plays out.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Star Trek: The Next Generations: Mirror Broken #1 (IDW Publishing) – The Free Comic Book Day release put this on my radar as I’m not much of a Star Trek fan (I watch the shows once in a while, but wasn’t a regular thing for me). That issue sucked me in with a Mirror world that I want to find out more about and see where this series goes.

4 Kids Walk Into A Bank #4 (Black Mask Studios) – It feels like forever since the last issue, but as soon as I start reading it it’s like getting together with an old friend. Funny and surprisingly tense this issue.

Eleanor & Egret #2 (Aftershock Comics) – The first issue was cute and quirky with a fun story and amazing art. I can’t wait for this second one.

Ian Livingstones’ Freeway Fighter #1 (Titan Comics) – The classic game comes to comics and the first issue is fantastic. If you’re a fan of Mad Max or that type of world, this is one that’s a must get.

Josephine Baker (Self Made Hero) – A graphic novel about this trailblazing woman who lived a life that’s so amazing it can’t be true… but it is, so read up and find out more.

 

Paul

Top Pick: Generation X #1 (Marvel) – FINALLY! I have been waiting for this title since it’s reveal. I loved the original run of Generation X back in the day, and I know this is a new batch of students taking up the name, but Jubilee is now in charge…how can this not be good? The line up is interesting, and anything with Quentin Quire is definitely worth checking out. This should be a fun read.

Super Sons #4 (DC Comics) – This book is fun and action packed and I love this new dynamic duo of Superboy and Robin. You definitely should be reading this title.

U.S.Avengers #6 (Marvel) – Steve Rogers is looking to take down Roberto and his team. Like they’re going to let that happen. This book has been hit or miss with me, but I am curious to see how they deal with Rogers and Hydra taking over.

X-Men Gold #4 (Marvel) – Gambit turns up, so you know things are going to be exciting. I’d like to see him re-join a team of X-Men, so why not this one?

Geoff Johns Gives the Scoop on Watchmen, Superman, and Doomsday Clock

With the finale chapter of “The Button” hitting shelves this Wednesday, writer Geoff Johns is lifting the veil as to what’s next for the DC Universe and Watchmen. It all comes full circle this November with Doomsday Clock.

The standalone miniseries will be written by Johns with art by Gary Frank and continues the mystery that began in DC Universe Rebirth Special #1.

As we can see with the teaser it blends together Superman, the classic Watchmen clock (without the blood) and Superman’s nemesis Doomsday is invoked in the title. That character appeared in the first Rebirth arc of Action Comics. At the end of that arc, the mysterious Oz had captured Doomsday and the Oz seems to be tied into Watchmen somehow. Interestingly, the story doesn’t involve Doomsday though.

Johns says this is “Watchmen colliding with the DC Universe” and sets up a Doctor Manhattan/Superman story exploring a character who has lost his humanity and an alien who embodies humanity.

The story is focused on the miniseries without tie-ins or crossovers, but it will impact the entire DC Universe and “affect everything moving forward and everything that has come before.”

Johns had been working on the story for some time but was influenced by the recent US Presidential election, but it’s more than about that. Johns will explore the attitude of people and the extremes that seem to be everywhere as well as the anger and frustration. Rebirth brought back hope to the DC Universe and the concept is whether Watchmen’s grime can infect it.

How far can Superman fall? We’re going to find out in Doomsday Clock.

DC Rebirth Recap And Review For Comics Released 5/3

Welcome to Graphic Policy’s DC Rebirth: Recap And Review where we take a look at the comics released under DC‘s Rebirth banner and try to work out just how accessible they are for new readers – we’ll also be providing  recap of sorts for the relevant story beats up until the issue in question in order to help you figure out if the series is something you’re interested in.

Each comic will receive a rating of Friendly or Unfriendly based on how easy it was for

new readers to pick them up; the ratings are based solely on the issues released in the post-Rebirth ongoing series. More consideration regarding the comic’s accessibility will be given for the specific issue being read rather than the series overall, but if reading a back issue will help, then that will be mentioned. Generally, the quality of an issue won’t be discussed unless it directly impacts a new reader’s enjoyment of the series.

You may notice that not every comic is covered week to week, and that’s because I  sometimes forget to read them  (although that doesn’t happen often). If I have missed an issue, typically I won’t go looking for back issues to catch up on events – this feature is all about accessibility for new readers, after all.


AQM_Cv22_dsAquaman #22 If people get scared around this odd new water (called H2.0) then they become crazy water monsters. There’s a bit more to it, but at this point Aquaman and Mera trying to get back to a secluded science island, so that a group of scientists and marines (who can shape shift into anthromophic sea creatures) aren’t massacred. Amazingly, that’s a Friendly recap for you.

Bane Conquest #1 The first issue of a Bane solo series? Oh yes. If you have the slightest idea who Bane is, and honestly I’d be surprised if you didn’t, then this is a Friendly place for you to start the series. Especially since it’s the first issue in the series.

Batman #22 So Unfriendly, but so good.

Cyborg #12  is Friendly enough, I guess, but it isn’t great…

Deathstroke #18 It’s been awhile since I’ve remembered the previous issue of this series (indeed I think I missed #17), so it’s kinda hard to keep track of the myriad plot threads – and I’ve read previous issues. You might be okay to start here,  but I’m leaning toward this being Unfriendly.

GLS_Cv22_dsGreen Arrow #22 Green Arrow has hit rock bottom. His company has been taken from him, Oliver Queen has been declared dead, and he’s living in a giant tree house in the woods. On top of that Seattle is currently in the midst of a giant terrorist attack. The blanks are filled in throughout the issue, which makes this happily Friendly.

Green Lanterns #22 A new arc started in this issue, and we find Earth’s Green Lanterns hurtling toward OA. Despite the lack of background as to how the Lanterns got into space (and why they were called) the issue is Friendly.

Justice League #20 Another series that has a Part One this week, and so long as you know who the League are, then you’ll be fine. Friendly.

Nightwing #20 Another brilliant issue that isn’t the best place to start reading the series, which makes it a touch Unfriendly, but the conclusion is just wonderful.

Superman #22 There’s a pretty solid recap from Lois Lane’s point of view that actually gives you more than I can remember about the previous issues. For that reason, I’m calling this Friendly, even though there will be a moment or two that’ll throw you off here and there (I’d tell you what happened to Superman and the others, but I don’t remember).

 

Preview: Superman #22

Superman #22

(W) Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason (A) Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza, Ray McCarthy (CA) Ryan Sook
RATED T
In Shops: May 03, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“BLACK DAWN” part one! What is the secret of the Dead Man’s Swamp? Superman is tested by a mysterious force that pushes his convictions to the limit. Can the Man of Steel save face in the eyes of Hamilton and his son, Superboy?

Review: Superman #22

Minor Spoilers Below

Superman is one of my favorite comic books out right now. It is consistent, it is action packed, and along with Action Comics, it gives us such a great return to the stories that make Superman, Superboy, and Lois such awesome characters. Sure, there is the Kryptonian history, and heat vision blasting giant monsters, and the mystery of past foes returning, and Mr. Oz, but there’s something else that makes these books great. It is family. Now that may sound cheesy to some of you, but I mean that. The family element of Clark, Lois, and their little boy, Jon who is slowly turning into a man and learning about his raw sense of power is touching and creates some great moments.

Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason together have brought such great world building outside of Metropolis with the life of the Kent’s and Superman’s past. Superman #22 continues the great storytelling with an issue that follows a worried wife and mother, Lois Lane. In the last issue, we saw Supes looking for Bats, and Jon and Damian fighting a giant squid. This series has been building mystery around the nice quiet farm town in Hamilton County where the Kent’s now live. There is the weird swamp and haunted house that Jon and his neighbor got lost in, and of course, the farmer who is always staring at them or wondering about Jon. We also had the odd appearance of Frankenstein, Lois’s friend Candice being an alien bounty hunter, and so much more. This family cannot catch a break, and this issue shows they may not anytime soon.

The art by Doug Mahnke has a nice cartoon style that is mixed with what you’d expect in a classic comic featuring an iconic character such as Superman. It walks the lines of over the top and realism nicely, and really gives everyone of the characters personality. The laid back nature of a country town is captured in the faces and expressions of each of the town folk, even right down to the freaky feeling that these people may be out to hurt her, and that there is a creepy mystery underneath all of them, like something out of a Stephen King novel. The inks by Jamie Mendoza and Ray McCarthy give us a book with a lot of darkness and shadows that is a very effective tool but the eeriness of this issue. Wil Quintana colors in between all of the darkness with some really bright colors that you’ve come to expect from a Superman book, right down to the iconic red and blue of his suit jumping off of the page. The art does a great job at letting us know something isn’t right in Hamilton County.

If you’ve been reading Superman, then you know what to expect in some of the issues that deal with the hometown that the Kent’s live in. We’ve been teased for a while that something is off about the town and the folks around it, and this issue only makes it weirder and more disturbing. I cannot wait to see where this series and this arc goes, and would highly recommend it to anyone.

Story: Peter J. Tomasi & Patrick Gleason Art: Doug Mahnke
Inks: Jaime Mendoza & Ray McCarthy Colors: Wil Quintana
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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