Tag Archives: wil quintana

Review: Teen Titans #20

This week’s new comic book day has come and gone but we’re not done reviewing this week’s comics! Check out the new direction of the Teen Titans in this new issue!

Teen Titans #20 is by Adam Glass, Bernard Chang, Marcelo Maiolo, Rob Leigh, Wil Quintana, Alex Garner, Jorge Jimenez, Andrea Shea, Alex Antone, and Brian Cunningham.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Dark Nights Metal: Dark Knights Rising

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got a collection of the Dark Knights Metal one-shots!

Dark Nights Metal: Dark Knights Rising is by Scott Syder, Grant Morrison, James Tynion IV, Joshua Williamson, Frank Tieri, Sam Humphries, Dan Abnett, Peter J. Tomasi, Carmine Di Giandomenico, Riccardo Federici, Ethan Van Sciver, Philip Tan, Tyler Kirkham, Francis Manapul, Tony S. Daniel, Danny Mini, Riley Rossmo, Howard Porter, Jorge Jimenez, Doug Mahnke, Jaime Mendoza, Ivan Plascencia, Rain Beredo, Jason Wright, Dean White, Arif Prianto, Tomeu Morey, Hi-Fi, Alejandro Sanchez, Wil Quintana, TOm Napolitano, Clayton Cowles, Jason Fabok, and Brad Anderson.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores on June 26. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Super Sons/Dynomutt and the Blue Falcon Special

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got the Super Sons teaming with Dynomutt!

Super Sons/Dynomutt and the Blue Falcon Special is by Peter J. Tomasi, Fernando Pasarin, Oclair Albert, Gabe Eltaeb, Rob Leigh, Romulo Fajardo Jr., Doug Mahnke, Wil Quintana, Jim Chadwick, and Liz Erickson.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Cyborg #21

Cyborg #21

Story: Marv Wolfman
Art: Tom Derenick, Scott Kolins
Color: Wil Quintana
Letterer: Rob Leigh
Cover Art: Dale Eaglesham, Ivan Nunes
Variant Cover: Carlos D’Anda, Luis Guerrero
Group Editor: Jim Chadwick
Editor: Harvey Richards
In Shops: Apr 04, 2018
SRP: $3.99

In the DC Universe, Cyborg is the most technical advanced being on the planet-or so we thought. Introducing Mother Box 2.0: Robo-Dojo! Unlike Cyborg, these robots are piloted by the government’s best, brightest, and most loyal soldiers. Super Heroes just got a major upgrade produced, developed and financed by S.T.A.R. Labs.

Review: Dark Knights Rising: The Wild Hunt #1

WildHuntCoverDetective Chimp and Grant Morrison fans, rejoice! Both play pivotal roles in Dark Knights Rising: The Wild Hunt, a one-shot that acts as the penultimate chapter of obscure DC Comic character and evil version of Batman filled “Metal” crossover. Morrison is joined by writers/DC architects Scott Snyder, James Tynion, and Joshua Williamson and a blockbuster art team of Howard Porter, Jorge Jimenez, Doug Mahnke, Jamie Mendoza, Hi-Fi, Alejandro Sanchez, and Wil Quintana to show the last stand of the multiverse against the Dark Multiverse and its metal album cover Batmen. You might want to dust off that copy of Final Crisis or at least check out the Wiki page of The Bleed before diving into this one-shot. The Batman: Red Death one-shot helps the emotional beats land.

The Wild Hunt has several gears it hits. There’s the Morrisonian multiversal technobabble that gets dropped pretty early on and thankfully is roasted by mad scientists, like T.O. Morrow and Sivana, who are apparently good guys in this crossover. This is when the book is at its least fun. However, it’s entertaining when the writers say “Screw it!” and let Porter, Jimenez, and Mahnke cut loose with super cool double page splashes that show these high (As balls.) concept in action. Some personal visual highlights include Jimenez’s manga meets speed lines pages of Raven interfacing with and then empathizing with The Bleed (Barrier between universes.) and then throwing down a kick-ass one-liner with a purple background. There’s also Porter’s ballad of Red Death, who gets a golden makeover and a little redemption in a decent homage to Crisis on Infinite Earths down to his final fate. (Maybe, you should read that comic too before taking on this one.)

The third gear of Wild Hunt, and honestly I blame Morrison for this one, is pure comics kookiness embodied by the first and final pages of the book. (I think they were drawn by Mahnke and Mendoza, but don’t quote me because his style blends well.) Morrison and Mahnke retell the origin story of Detective Chimp and gets a little metafictional by including the map from Multiversity and the sheet music from Superman’s song in Final Crisis. These panels feel like a couple of old rockers digging into their greatest hits before the last third of the comics hits, and they realize they need a new hit single to get the fans on their feet again. (In light of the event of Wild Hunt #1, this comic could be taken literally or metaphorically.)

ChimpYearOne

However, I don’t think they stick the landing and going for wacky for the sake of wackiness instead of something poignant. I do find the idea of Detective Chimp as a kind of ersatz furry Batman to be fascinating, and he gets a full Hero’s Journey in Wild Hunt #1 as he comes to grips with using the vast knowledge of the DC multiverse stored underneath his deer stalker. (The origin for his trademark headwear gave me all the feels.) He wants to be hopeful and look up in the sky, but hell is opening up at his feet. Chimp is piddling around a keyboard and trying to find a tune to save the world, and hell, he might have found it. Also, his piano playing is a nice throughline between Morrison’s work on Final Crisis and Snyder’s on Metal because a shared superhero universe is a neverending symphony of players, characters and creators both.

With searing multiversal land (and sound)scapes from Howard Porter, Jorge Jimenez, and Doug Mahnke; enchanting and frightening colors from Hi-Fi, Alejandro Sanchez, and Wil Quintana; and a very Grant Morrison, The Wild Hunt #1 is a decent setup to the Metal finale even though the last few pages will either make you laugh nervously or do a hard eye roll.

Story: Scott Snyder, Grant Morrison, James Tynion IV, Josh Williamson Art: Howard Porter, Jorge Jimenez, Doug Mahnke with Jamie Mendoza
Colors: Hi-Fi, Alejandro Sanchez, Wil Quintana

Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review : The Newsboy Legion And The Boy Commandos Special #1

On paper, this sounded like an idea that was either really going to work — or miss the mark by a country mile.

Howard Chaykin‘s name has, of course, been synonymous with revamping “old-time” characters for decades now — he was the first to do it for The Shadow, and later took a crack at such venerable properties as BlackhawkBuck RogersDC‘s various Silver Age sci-fi stalwarts, and many others. Doing it one more time surely shouldn’t be too much of a challenge — but this is the first time he’s taken on a Jack Kirby creation front and center, and given the relative innocence and whimsy that are the heart and soul of both The Newsboy Legion and The Boy Commandos, well — let’s just say Chaykin doesn’t seem like a “natural fit” for either. And certainly his newly-minted status as very nearly a persona non grata among many fans isn’t going to help matters much in terms of sales here, but if we leave all the controversy aside and just examine this book on its own merits, I have to say — it’s not too shabby at all.

If you’re “off Chaykin,” fair enough — but if you’re not, there’s plenty to really like in the pages of The Newsboy Legion And The Boy Commandos Special  #1 (I’m getting the full title from the copyright indicia even though both “the”s, as well as the “and,” are omitted from the cover) : Chaykin’s typically-crowded and garish visuals are nicely evocative of the worldwide air of confusion and disorientation that no doubt prevailed anywhere and everywhere during WWII; he displays an immediate and easy understanding of his large and sprawling cast and makes them all seem like fairly unique individuals; letterer/effects artist par excellence Ken Bruzenak brings his “A” game and then some; colorist Wil Quintana (who seems to have replaced Jesus Aburto as Chaykin’s hues-man of choice) adds terrific depth, nuance, and vibrancy to every panel and page; the “team-up” of these classic “kid gangs” is achieved by means both logically sound and narratively seamless; the stand-alone story cleverly telegraphs its simple-yet-effective ending early on in a manner that will bring a smile to your face when you think about it later — honestly, this all reads like a very heartfelt and respectful tribute to The King Of Comics that isn’t so much stuck in the past but informed  and inspired by it. The only thing missing that I would have liked to see? That would be The Guardian — but hey, he at least turns up in the classic Joe Simon -scripted, Kirby-drawn Golden Age Newsboy Legion reprint story that’s included as a backup feature (and is, in fairness, the highlight of the book — but how could it not be?), and that serves to round off a nicely-done package that’s $4.99 (which I paid out of pocket) well spent.

There’s a fine line between respectful homage and slavish, uninspired rehash, of course, and these “King 100” specials are sure to have plenty of both (and, indeed, already have, as Shane Davis‘ lackluster New Gods Special #1 was definitely the latter), but it’s probably not fair, given their editorial remit, to expect any of them to be especially groundbreaking or innovative. Chaykin doesn’t strive for either with this book, but he successfully operates within the parameters he’s been given to craft a perfectly enjoyable story that even manages to incorporate some genuine historical material (specifically the attempts of domestic “fifth column” Nazi sympathizers in the US to stage a coup against their own government) that adds an air of intrigue and authenticity to the proceedings that goes well above and beyond what we as readers probably have any right to realistically expect from what could reasonably be assumed, going in, to be nothing more than a simple “throwaway” yarn.

All that being said, if you weren’t a fan of Chaykin’s signature — and frankly singular — style of storytelling prior to this comic, there’s pretty much zero chance that you’ll enjoy it here, either. Things are cluttered, frenetic, deliberately “messy,” and events occur in staggering, rapid-fire succession. He’s been doing this since American Flagg!, and he’s not going to change now. You’re either on-board with “Chaykin Comics,” or you’re not. I admit that I am, but do understand why many readers aren’t, as any number of consensus “Comic Book 101” basics are either bent into unrecognizable form, or ignored altogether in Chaykin’s works. So keep that in mind before you fork over your hard-earned cash for this book.

Final verdict, then : odds are you’ll know whether or not The Newsboy Legion And The Boy Commandos Special #1 is “your kind of comic” before you even give it a glance at your LCS. If it’s not, then it won’t be. If it is, then it will be — and may even exceed your expectations.

Story : Howard Chaykin  Art : Howard Chaykin

Story : 7.5  Art : 8.5  Overall : 8  Recommendation : Buy

 

Marvel Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Occupy Avengers Vol. 1 Taking Back Justice

It’s Wednesday which means new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week from Marvel is Occupy Avengers!

Occupy Avengers Vol. 1 Taking Back Justice features issues #1-4 and Avengers (1963) #80-81 by David F. Walker, Carlos Pacheco, Rafael Fonteriz, Sonia Oback, and Wil Quintana.

Find out about the book and whether you should grab yourself a copy. You can find it in comic stores and book stores now!

Get your copy at comic stores June 21 and book stores July 3. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Occupy Avengers Vol. 1 Taking Back Justice
Amazon or TFAW

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: Superman #24

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

I will admit, when I was first reading Superman #24, I was confused for a moment, due to the last issue of Action Comics. In that issue we see Clark, Lois, and Jon back in Metropolis, and here they are still in Hamilton County, wrapping things up with aliens, giant beasts, and more weirdness. That being said, chapter five of the Black Dawn story-line offered some fun and interesting twists.

We finally get to see who is behind all of the weird cult-like townspeople, visits from aliens, and other weird mysteries in Hamilton County that has plagued this series from the start, and it’s none other than Manchester Black. Due to his core beliefs, Black has a problem with Superman letting bad guys live. This is similar to other anti-heroes, like The Punisher, and so on, but Black is a little more evil here. Black reveals his true motives, and they involve Clark’s son, Jon aka Superboy. By the end of the book things get pretty crazy with his plans, and it will be interesting to see how the next issue, and this story plays out. Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason have done a good job with this series, and I have confidence that this will at least be another fun adventure when all is said and done.

Doug Mahnke and Patrick Gleason are both excellent artists. Neither of these talents are strangers to this book, and Gleason even co-writes with Tomasi. My only problem is with the switching on pencils about halfway through. Again, both artists are fantastic, but it was jarring and very noticeable to me as you can clearly see the switch. I am not sure if this was based on time, and scheduling, and it isn’t terrible or hurts the comic in a bad way, it was just very noticeable. The colors by Wil Quintana, John Kalisz, and Hi-Fi are bright and vivid, covering all types of aliens and ships, while the inks by Jaime Mendoza, Mick Gray, Joe Prado, and Doug Mahnke are crisp and well done, even with the different pencil styles.

The issue is a fun and wild ride featuring the cast of characters we know from this series. The Kent family is awesome, and I have had a blast going on these adventures with them. My only hope is that since they’ve been put through so much as a family, especially poor Jon, is that they find some more time to relax soon. Also Krypto makes another appearance, which is always awesome.

Story: Peter Tomasi & Patrick Gleason Art: Doug Mahnke & Patrick Gleason
Inks: Jaime Mendoza, Mick Gray, Joe Prado, and Doug Mahnke
Colors: Wil Quintana, John Kalisz, and Hi-Fi Letters: Rob Leigh

Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Superman #22

Minor Spoilers Below

Superman is one of my favorite comic books out right now. It is consistent, it is action packed, and along with Action Comics, it gives us such a great return to the stories that make Superman, Superboy, and Lois such awesome characters. Sure, there is the Kryptonian history, and heat vision blasting giant monsters, and the mystery of past foes returning, and Mr. Oz, but there’s something else that makes these books great. It is family. Now that may sound cheesy to some of you, but I mean that. The family element of Clark, Lois, and their little boy, Jon who is slowly turning into a man and learning about his raw sense of power is touching and creates some great moments.

Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason together have brought such great world building outside of Metropolis with the life of the Kent’s and Superman’s past. Superman #22 continues the great storytelling with an issue that follows a worried wife and mother, Lois Lane. In the last issue, we saw Supes looking for Bats, and Jon and Damian fighting a giant squid. This series has been building mystery around the nice quiet farm town in Hamilton County where the Kent’s now live. There is the weird swamp and haunted house that Jon and his neighbor got lost in, and of course, the farmer who is always staring at them or wondering about Jon. We also had the odd appearance of Frankenstein, Lois’s friend Candice being an alien bounty hunter, and so much more. This family cannot catch a break, and this issue shows they may not anytime soon.

The art by Doug Mahnke has a nice cartoon style that is mixed with what you’d expect in a classic comic featuring an iconic character such as Superman. It walks the lines of over the top and realism nicely, and really gives everyone of the characters personality. The laid back nature of a country town is captured in the faces and expressions of each of the town folk, even right down to the freaky feeling that these people may be out to hurt her, and that there is a creepy mystery underneath all of them, like something out of a Stephen King novel. The inks by Jamie Mendoza and Ray McCarthy give us a book with a lot of darkness and shadows that is a very effective tool but the eeriness of this issue. Wil Quintana colors in between all of the darkness with some really bright colors that you’ve come to expect from a Superman book, right down to the iconic red and blue of his suit jumping off of the page. The art does a great job at letting us know something isn’t right in Hamilton County.

If you’ve been reading Superman, then you know what to expect in some of the issues that deal with the hometown that the Kent’s live in. We’ve been teased for a while that something is off about the town and the folks around it, and this issue only makes it weirder and more disturbing. I cannot wait to see where this series and this arc goes, and would highly recommend it to anyone.

Story: Peter J. Tomasi & Patrick Gleason Art: Doug Mahnke
Inks: Jaime Mendoza & Ray McCarthy Colors: Wil Quintana
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Marvel Weekly Graphic Novel Review: The Astonishing Ant-Man Vol. 3

It’s Wednesday which means new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We’ve got a new volume from Marvel, The Astonishing Ant-Man.

The Astonishing Ant-Man Vol. 3: The Trial of Ant-Man collects issues 10 to 13 and Guardians Team-Up #7 by Nick Spencer, Ramon Rosanas, Brent Schoonover, Jordan Boyd, and Wil Quintana.

Find out about the trade and whether you should grab yourself a copy. You can find both in comic stores March 29 and bookstores April 11.

Get your copies now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

The Astonishing Ant-Man Vol. 3: The Trial of Ant-Man
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

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