Tag Archives: tom orzechowski

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It’s Music and Magic with Monsters & Midways

Second Sight Publishing has announced a new a six issue limited series that was originally thought up by a comics rookie in 50-year-old Chicago O’Hare Airport police officer, Nick Goodwin. Monsters & Midways had been in his head for years until he mentioned it to his neighbor and friend, Chuck Satterlee.

In Monsters & Midways, A down on his luck heavy metal guitarist in 1976 Chicago hasn’t gotten very far with his songs about elves and wizards and dark magic. Let’s see how he does with the real thing. M&M has magic and wizards and barbarians and elves and monsters and is simply a good old-fashioned fun comic book tale set in a time and place both Goodwin and Satterlee know well… the Chicago of their childhoods. Another way to think of MONSTERS & MIDWAYS is to take a cover of heavy metal magazine and a cover of Savage Sword of Conan. Shred both, pack them in a bowl and smoke them. That’s MONSTERS & MIDWAYS! Essentially, an ancient wizard with a lack of people skills teams up with a magic weapon maker and a brand new Barbarian in order to stop an evil wizard from mixing dark magic and nuclear energy… and with it, the end of the world as we know it.

In addition to the covers and interiors by Jeremy Megert, readers of the series will also see variant covers by industry legends, Phil Hester, Tyler Walpole, and Ben Templesmith. The series will be colored by Mickey Clausen and lettered by industry legend, Tom Orzechowski.

Second Sight Publishing’s No Other Gods Warns of the Dangers of Fascism Heading Into the 2022 Midterm Elections

Second Sight Publishing is definitely changing things up with their newest series announcement! No Other Gods is a five-issue mini-series set to be released just after July 4th, 2022 and will conclude just a few days before the 2022 midterm elections in the United States in November of the same year. The series is set in a world with enhanced powered beings but other than that tale of fantasy, the series is grounded in the reality of a politically divided nation.

No Other Gods is co-created by Chuck Satterlee (writer) and Neil van Antwerpen (artist). The series will be colored by Mickey Clausen and lettered by industry legend, Tom Orzechowski. Variant covers by Michael Avon Oeming and Steven Bryant have been announced.

Review: Spawn’s Universe #1

Spawn's Universe #1

Big things are happening in Spawn’s universe expanding the world beyond the title character. The hope is to spawn (no pun intended) a universe of stories. Spawn’s Universe #1 is the next step in creator Todd McFarlane‘s plan to do exactly that.

Spawn’s Universe #1 is home to a lot of great comic artists and I thought they all knocked it out of the park. Whether it was Jim Cheung doing the main character, or Brett Booth on Gunslinger, Stephen Segovia working with Medieval, or Marcio Takara on art for She-Spawn’s story, I thought all of the artists working on this issue really nailed the look and feel of what they were given to illustrate. Art-wise, this is the kind of effort that I think could get people interested in this book. There’s not an ugly page to be found here and each artists’ style feels so distinct from one another. The various colorists and letterers put the cherry on top of a fantastic-looking issue.

Todd McFarlane handled the writing duties on all the stories and the one thing I’d say is I do kinda like how he writes. It feels like a mix of old and new, still decompressed for the newer era of comics but with a nice bit of narrative caption boxes throughout the issue. The story did seem to have a few problems. My main one is that I’m pretty sure there are characters used here and I have no idea who they are. Who is the guy on Omega’s island? Who was the guy with angel wings? Are these people that read the monthly title would know? There’s a lot of action in the pages and Spawn’s still a cool character but adding in some more of the Spawns and Cy-Gor was an added treat. The short stories are good starting points for what will happen with the supporting cast. I thought Gunslinger Spawn’s solo story was the best of the lot.

Overall, Spawn’s Universe #1 is a tiny bit confusing to read but it’s nice to look at. I’m hoping it’s just that I’m not a monthly Spawn reader that causes it but then it begs the question: is this a good jumping-on point for new readers to Spawn? I think that Spawn’s Universe will be a rewarding experience for those who have stuck with the title but that’s it, outside of just simple artistic enjoyment. Still, Spawn is 300+ issues old and a new launching pad should still offer something for the older readers. Hopefully, newer readers can make sense of it all.

Story: Todd McFarlane Art: Jim Cheung, Brett Booth, Stephen Segovia, Marcio Takara
Inks: Adelso Corona, Todd McFarlane Lettering: Tom Orzechowski, Andworld Design
Colors: Fco Plascencia, Andrew Dalhouse, Peter Steigerwald
Story: 5.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 7.0

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology KindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: X-Men Classic: The Complete Collection Vol. 2

Classic X-Men were reprints of the original X-Men comics… with new material!? These collections collect that new material with some depth as to the history of it all.

X-Men Classic: The Complete Collection Vol. 2 collects Classic X-Men #24-44 and material from Marvel Fanfare #60.

Story: Chris Claremont, Ann Nocenti, Tom Orzechowski, Daryl Edelman, Fabian Nicieza, John Byrne
Art: John Bolton, June Brigman, Mark Bright, Rick Leonardi, Kyle Baker, Jim Lee, Jim Fern, Mike Collins, Kieron Dwyer, Dave Ross, John Byrne
Ink: John Bolton, Ro Richardson, Josef Rubinstein, Bob McLeod, Kyle Baker, Hilary Barta, Terry Austin, Ricardo Villamonte
Color: Glynis Oliver, John Bolton, Christie Scheele, Petra Scotese, Mike Rockwitz, Gregory Wright, Bob Sharen
Letterer: Tom Orzechowski, Joe Rosen, Jim Novak, Bill Oakley, Michael Heisler, Lois Buhalis, John Costanza, Diana Albers

Get your copy in comic shops now and on book shops on December 10! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Marvel Tales Featuring: Black Widow

Marvel continues to celebrate 80 years with the latest Marvel Tales, this one featuring Black Widow!

Marvel Tales Featuring Black Widow features Mystic Comics #4, Tales of Suspense #52, Amazing Spider-Man #86, Amazing Adventures #1, Marvel Fanfare #10, and Red Widow: First Strike by George Kapitan, Harry Sahle, Stan Lee, Don Rico, Don Heck, Sam Rosen, John Romita, Jim Mooney, Gary Friedrich, John Buscema, John Verpoorten, Art Simek, Ralph Macchio, George Perez, Brett Breeding, Petra Scotese, Tom Orzechowski, Margaret Stohl, Nico Leon, Andres Mossa, and Travis Lanham.

Get your copy in comic shops today! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Man and Superman 100-Page Super Spectacular

Man and Superman prints for the first time a Marv Wolfman Superman story that has sat in the vaults for over a decade. Taking on Clark’s first few days in Metropolis the fantastic comic features the art of Claudio Castellini, colors by Hi-Fi, and lettering by Tom Orzechowski.

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Green Lantern #1

It’s a new start for the Green Lanterns as they go back to their “police cop” roots courtesy of writer Grant Morrison and artist Liam Sharp. But is the back to basics good? The Green Lantern #1 also features color by Steve Oliff and lettering by Tom Orzechowski.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Black Panther Vol. 2 A Nation Under Our Feet

Black Panther is coming to theaters and we’re reviewing each trade paperback volume of the current ongoing series from Marvel! We continue with the second volume of, “A Nation Under Our Feet.”

Black Panther Vol. 2 A Nation Under Our Feet collects issues #5-8 by Ta-Nehisi Coates, Chris Sprouse, Karl Story, and Laura Martin. It also features Jungle Action #6-7 by Don McGregor, Rich Buckler, Klaus Janson, Tom Orzechowski, and Glynnis Wein.

Get your copy. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Flashback Friday Review: Spawn #1

spawn-1While a strange assailant stalks the city, ripping out human hearts, another otherwordly being arrives. As his mind reels, our tortured hero remembers that he struck a deal with the devil in order to return to his beloved wife – five years after his death.

May 1992 saw the release of the upstart comic publisher Image Comics‘ second series Spawn by Todd McFarlane. With lettering by Tom Orzechowski and colors by Steve Oliff, the first issue was the launch of one of comics’ currently longest running series (and really one of the longest, period).

I remember enjoying the series, one of the first “edgy” heroes I was introduced to at the time. Seeing Spawn then, and now, it’s hard to miss how different the character and series was from what else was being published.

With McFarlane’s signature art, which still holds up all these years later, the first issue is a choppy start jumping between two detectives figuring out a string of murders and our “hero” who himself is figuring out what happened to him.

There’s some interesting things I didn’t notice when I first read the series and reading it now. Being 13 years old when it was first introduced, the fact Al Simmons was African-American wasn’t as apparent then as it is now. McFarlane doesn’t make it 100% clear, but on this re-read, it’s a bit clearer. There’s also a solid use of time which I remember standing out during my first read. The issue has two news reports and through subtle changes between the two we can tell time has passed. 25 years later, that still stands out and what I really remember of the comic.

As I said, the story itself is a bit choppy but pretty easy to understand. McFarlane’s art is what really stands out and some of that choppy sense is due to choices that enhances the horror of what’s going for Simmons as he begins to remember his life.

The colors by Oliff and lettering by Orzechowski stand out as well. They each enhance the issue, especially the lettering which really gives a “voice” to Spawn. Through the lettering you can “hear” the gravely voice.

The first issue isn’t perfect by a long shot, but it holds up surprisingly well in both the art and story itself. My gut says, out of all of the initial Image releases from 1992, this one might hold up the best and it’s longevity is an indication of that.

Story and Art: Todd McFarlane Lettering: Tom Orzechowski Colors: Steve Oliff
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.45 Overall: 8.45 Recommendation: Buy

Retro Friday Review: Spawn #1

spawn-1While a strange assailant stalks the city, ripping out human hearts, another otherwordly being arrives. As his mind reels, our tortured hero remembers that he struck a deal with the devil in order to return to his beloved wife – five years after his death.

May 1992, almost 25 years ago, saw the release of the upstart comic publisher Image Comics‘ second series Spawn by Todd McFarlane. With lettering by Tom Orzechowski and colors by Steve Oliff, the first issue was the launch of one of comics’ currently longest running series (and really one of the longest, period). In honor of Image’s 25th, I thought it’d be fun to explore the first issue again as part of our “Retro Friday” to see how the comic holds up after all this time.

I remember enjoying the series, one of the first “edgy” heroes I was introduced to at the time. Seeing Spawn then, and now, it’s hard to miss how different the character and series was from what else was being published.

With McFarlane’s signature art, which still holds up all these years later, the first issue is a choppy start jumping between two detectives figuring out a string of murders and our “hero” who himself is figuring out what happened to him.

There’s some interesting things I didn’t notice when I first read the series and reading it now. Being 13 years old when it was first introduced, the fact Al Simmons was African-American wasn’t as apparent then as it is now. McFarlane doesn’t make it 100% clear, but on this re-read, it’s a bit clearer. There’s also a solid use of time which I remember standing out during my first read. The issue has two news reports and through subtle changes between the two we can tell time has passed. 25 years later, that still stands out and what I really remember of the comic.

As I said, the story itself is a bit choppy but pretty easy to understand. McFarlane’s art is what really stands out and some of that choppy sense is due to choices that enhances the horror of what’s going for Simmons as he begins to remember his life.

The colors by Oliff and lettering by Orzechowski stand out as well. They each enhance the issue, especially the lettering which really gives a “voice” to Spawn. Through the lettering you can “hear” the gravely voice.

The first issue isn’t perfect by a long shot, but it holds up surprisingly well in both the art and story itself. My gut says, out of all of the initial Image releases from 1992, this one might hold up the best and it’s longevity is an indication of that.

Story and Art: Todd McFarlane Lettering: Tom Orzechowski Colors: Steve Oliff
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.45 Overall: 8.45 Recommendation: Buy

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