Tag Archives: terry blas

Boldly Go Where No Gem Has Gone Before in Steven Universe #25

BOOM! Studios has announced that Steven Universe #25, on-sale in February 2019, will kick off an epic new comic book exclusive storyline featuring fan favorite space hero, Lars of the Stars! Writer Terry Blas and artist Gabriele Bagnoli reveal Lars and the Off Colors’ hidden truths, as Steven and Connie join them in space for a mind-bending adventure no fan can miss.

Bingo bongo, spacefarers! From slinging donuts in Beach City to swashbuckling his way across the galaxy in a stolen spaceship, Lars has come a long way. And now with the Off Colors as his dependable and devoted crew, he’ll travel even further into the cosmos. But how deep is this newfound confidence? And what happens when the entire crew’s lives depend on him? Blas and Bagnoli blast us into hyperspace for an out-of-this-world journey into a mysterious nebula that forces our daring cast of gems, humans, and fusions to confront their deepest, darkest fears.

Steven Universe #25 features a main cover by fan favorite artist Missy Peña, along with a preorder variant cover by Francesca Perrone and comes to shelves February 27, 2019.

Oni Press’ Draw Out the Vote is Here

Why rock the vote, when you can draw it? Oni Press has launched Draw Out the Vote, a free state by state comics voting guide to view, download, print, and share, available now! Join creators Kiku Hughes (ELEMENTS: Fire – A Comic Anthology by Creators of Color), Jarrett Williams (Super Pro K.O.!), Bianca Xunise (The Nib), Shamus Beyale (Ghetto Klown), Melanie Gillman (As The Crow Files), Christina “Steenz” Stewart (Archival Quality), Natalie Riess (Space Battle Lunchtime), Arigon Starr (Super Indian), Terry Blas (Dead Weight: Murder at Camp Bloom), Rashad Doucet (Alabaster Shadows), and more, discussing a variety of topics centered around the act of voting.

Fifty-two different artists explore what voting, politics, and living in American mean to them in this collection of black-and-white comics. Cartoonists from each state (plus Washington, DC and Puerto Rico) were invited to contribute to the project, which Oni hopes will increase voter awareness and encourage comics readers to vote in the November midterm elections. Included with each comic are instructions on how to register to vote in each state—as well as what to do to actually vote, and other things to note that may affect your ability to vote. (Can you wear a campaign shirt to the polls? Can you vote if you have a felony conviction?) Voting is our civic duty, and Oni Press wants to make it as easy as possible for people to register and vote in 2018.

FlameCon 2018: The Panels

To go along with an environment free of toxicity and full of heartfelt enthusiasm to go with the water stations, pronoun stickers, and the best press lounge in my five years of covering conventions, Flame Con also had nuanced panels on a variety of comics and pop culture topics with panelists, who represented a broad spectrum of voices and experiences. I attended three panels at the con: “Fan Activists Assemble!” about practical ways members of fandom can effect sociopolitical change, “Fangirl… But then Make It Fashion” an entertaining, yet wide ranging panel about the larger cultural context of character designs and costumes, and “Telling All Ages Queer Stories” about LGBTQ representation in all ages comics.

Jay Edidin and Elana Levin

Fan Activists Assemble! (Saturday)

Fan Activists Assemble” was hosted by Elana Levin of Graphic Policy Radio, who also trains digital organizes and is a new media mentor and also featured a guest appearance from journalist and podcaster Jay Edidin of Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men fame. Pop culture has always been intertwined with her activism beginning with her love for the X-Men comics, and her current passion is bridging those two worlds via the tool of the Internet. She also talked about how social media and the ability for protests to “trend” has helped the way they are viewed in society unlike in the past when protesters were arrested or beat up by the police, and their narrative was shaped by traditional news media.

As Stephen Duncombe said, “Scratch an activist, and you’re apt to find a fan.” At the beginning of her talk, Elana Levin stated many strengths that fans can bring to the world of activism, including community building, thinking beyond the world we exist in, and practical skills like art, writing, social media posting, and even meme and GIF making. Fans don’t have to reinvent the wheel and form their own organization and can bring their talents and fresh POV to existing organizations from larger ones like GLAAD or the ACLU to smaller, local ones.

Next, Levin brought in Jay Edidin as a case study of fan activism when he confronted Dark Horse Comics for having healthcare that excluded any coverage “…related to gender dysphoria and transition” while claiming to be an LGBTQ friendly company and featuring the Pride flag on their Twitter profile. Edidin used to be an employee of Dark Horse Comics and has been a journalist since 2007. He couldn’t go public for a while because his ex-husband worked for Dark Horse, but seeing the company’s Pride Day tweet led to him confronting the company. With the help of comic book creator, Mariah McCourt, an open letter stating a demand for expanding Dark Horse’s healthcare coverage was drafted and signed by many comics professionals. Dark Horse changed their policy a day before the letter went public.

Elana Levin showed that this action fit an effective four part organizational strategy. There was the goal, which was for Dark Horse Comics to have trans inclusive healthcare, the target was upper management because they have the power to effect change in the company, the “ask” was for comics creators to sign the open letter, and the message was for Dark Horse to basically put their money where their mouth is and support the LGBTQ community through their actions and not just through rainbow logos. Jay Edidin added that using the letter format was important because comics creators are vulnerable on their own.

Later, in the panel, Elana Levin gave examples of how social media and hashtags are able to shape discussions like the conversation around having an Asian American Iron Fist that cast a shadow over Finn Jones’ eventual casting as him in the Marvel Netflix show. Even if this didn’t end in a “win”, it started a conversation, and Marvel later did some race bent casting by having Tessa Thompson play Valkyrie in Thor Ragnarok and Zazie Beetz play Domino in Deadpool 2. Levin also laid out practical rules for hashtags, including keeping them short and simple and only using two per tweet. An example was using #WakandatheVote and #BlackPanther in a tweet about registering voters who were in line for the Black Panther film. She also reiterated the importance of having a specific goal, targeting decision makers, and having a clear ask in online activism using the Harry Potter Alliance’s efforts of having the franchise’s chocolate frogs made with fair trade chocolate and opposing North Carolina’s anti-trans HB2 “bathroom bill”.

The panel concluded with Levin engaging the audience in their own activism brainstorming session with an audience member discussing the need for more asexual representation in pop culture and comics and using FlameCon as a venue to make a case for this.  This led to a side discussion about the importance of fun in activism and helping keep people engaged in cause from free pizza and T-shirts to crafting GIFs like one of the Dora Milaje from Black Panther metaphorically confronting ICE.

Little Corvus, Yoshi Yoshitani, Aaron Reese, Terry Blas, Jen Bartel, Irene Koh

“Fangirl… But Then Make It Fashion!” (Saturday)

“Fan Activists Assemble” was immediately followed by the “Fangirl… But Then Make It Fashion” panel, which was moderated by Geeks Out’s Aaron Reese. The panelists were comic book creators Little Corvus (Deja Brew), Yoshi Yoshitani (Jem and the Holograms), Terry Blas (Dead Weight), Irene Koh (The Legend of Korra), and Jen Bartel (America). After breaking the ice with a fun discussion about favorite candies, Reese started out by asking about the difference between cultural inspiration and appropriation in character outfits. Bartel stressed the importance of “cultural and historical context” in fashion while Koh gave the positive example of the Bangladeshi character she introduced in the Legend of Korra comics as well as time periods where there was “cultural exchange” between European and Asian cultures.

A negative example given by Koh was Queen Amidala’s outfits in Star Wars, which she said were inspired by North Asian and Mongolian fashions and demeaned the original culture. Reese added that Padme had dreadlocks in a deleted scene from Revenge of the Sith, which led to the realization that most of the design and fashion choices in Star Wars are cultural appropriation beginning with the “white guys dressed like ninjas” that Terry Blas used to describe the Jedi Knights. Blas said that unlike Star Wars which exoticizes or “others” its Asian influences, Avatar: The Last Airbender respected Asian cultures even though it wasn’t created by Asians and was superhero stories for people who didn’t have superheroes that looked like them.

The discussion then turned to the popular video game Overwatch where Yoshi Yoshitani criticized the character Doomfist, whose map and character is supposedly inspired by Nigerian culture, but he is half naked, has tusks, and looks like the creators never did research on actual Nigerian fashion. She said that Hanzo and Symmetra had good designs while Irene Koh poked fun at Hanzo’s obsession with honor. Aaron Reese said that the issue with Overwatch was that the game designers focused on environments instead of character looks.

The next topic was body positivity, and Reese gave a shout out to Rose Quartz and the curviness and softness of characters in Steven Universe as well as the strength of Antiope from the Wonder Woman film and the other athletic “hunter/gatherer” Amazon women. His bad example was Psylocke, and a slide showed an example from both the comics and Olivia Munn playing her in X-Men: Apocalypse. Little Corvus made a good point that the difficulty that the panel had thinking of examples was a big problem in pop culture. Terry Blas used the example of his comic Dead Weight about a murder mystery at a fat camp where the characters are drawn as fat in different ways that reflects their character instead of just having the same body shape.

Bartel said that she had done covers for the character Faith from Valiant Comics and liked her as a representative of body positivity, but said that she wished she could redesign her costume into something that the superheroine would actually wear. In connection with this, Blas said that some male comic book artists spend hours of research getting a jet engine part right, but don’t consider fashion in their work. This led to a discussion about female superhero body types with Yoshitani saying that there was pressure on female superheroes to be perfect for everyone. Irene Koh said that she wished superhero artists took inspiration from ESPN: The Body Issue, which shows how different kinds of athletes have different body types.

Other topics discussed by the panel, included gender expression and how this was handled better in anime than in Western comics with Little Corvus making an excellent point about how Mulan could be non-binary as she explores different gender presentations in the 1998 Disney film. Another topic was color washing where Reese and Koh strongly criticized writers who described people of color like food.  The panel ended on a positive note with Reese, Blas, and Little Corvus talking about how the Runaways from the Hulu TV show and America were good representations of teenage fashion and their clothing choices made them seem like they were real people.

This panel reinforced the idea that careful attention to a character’s heritage even through something like a piece of clothing makes for a richer reading or viewing experience, and it also challenged me to look at media that I have taken for granted for instances of cultural appropriation. Star Wars was a big one.

Steve Fox, Chad Sell, Barbara Perez Marquez, Molly Ostertag, Lilah Sturges, James Tynion IV

“Telling All Ages Queer Stories” (Sunday)

The final panel I attended was on Sunday and was about all ages comics created by LGBTQ creators. The panel was moderated by Paste’s Steve Foxe and featured Chad Sell (Cardboard Kingdom), Barbara Perez Marquez (Cardboard Kingdom), Molly Ostertag (Witch Boy), Lilah Sturges (Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass), and James Tynion IV (Justice League Dark)Foxe began by asking what kind of LGBTQ characters whether positive or negative the panelists came across when they were young adults.

Tynion said that he mainly read superhero comics growing up where there wasn’t a lot of LGBTQ representation except for homophobic jokes and said he connected to the X-Men as well as webcomics with gay characters when he was in middle school. Sell said that an issue of Superman from the early 1990s scared him into possibly not coming out when two gay men were chased out of town and then rescued by Superman. The point he got from this story is that if he came out as gay, he would be forced to run away. Sturges’ first experience with a trans character in media was The Crying Game, but she said until Lana Wachowski made her 2012 speech that trans characters were portrayed as either pathetic or deceivers. She said that she enjoyed writing Jo as a happy trans kid in Lumberjanes. Perez Marquez talked about how she didn’t grow up with LGBTQ characters, but did connect with queer coded” characters like Spinelli from Recess.

Foxe’s next question was that in writing stories about LGBT youth that the panelists drew on their own childhood or an idealized one. James Tynion said that his science fiction series The Woods about a school being transported to a different planet drew on his own experiences as an out queer high schooler while his series The Backstagers about theater kids was more idealized. Molly Ostertag said that she wasn’t out as a lesbian in high school, and her upcoming queer high school girl romance was a vision of what she wanted as a teenager. However, she didn’t want to talk down to teens or avoid the realities of homophobia. Lilah Sturges said she felt a moment of doubt writing about the happy romance between Mal and Molly in Lumberjanes, but said she was able to write it because Lumberjanes like their relationship is a true utopian vision. Barbara Perez Marquez’s work on Cardboard Kingdom was more true to her life as a young queer Dominican girl while her webcomic Order of the Belfry was pure wish fulfillment about lady knights who kiss.

The discussion shifted to queer content filtering and pushback about LGBTQ content from editors and publishers. Tynion made a good point about how companies realized there was money in queer audiences and said he got some pushback in his superhero books and relatively none in his all ages comics for BOOM! Ostertag said it was easier to “push the envelope” in regards to LGBTQ content in comics versus television where she rarely interacted with the people who pulled the strings. So, it was much easier for her to explore gender roles in Witch Boy where a boy wants to try girl magic and not boy magic and harder to have a same gender couple holding hands in the background of an animated show. Sell and Perez Marquez talked about the “sneaky” representation of Cardboard Kingdom which are stories geared to 9-12 year olds and don’t have labels, but do explore things like same sex attraction and gender nonconformity.

Then, the panel basically transformed into a pure celebration of LGBTQ YA stories. James Tynion talked about how in Backstagers that he began with subtle representation and then had two of his leads, Jory and Hunter, become boyfriends by the end of the series. Lilah Sturges said that she enjoyed writing a pre-teen trans coming of age story in Lumberjanes because it’s not sexual and is a pure statement about what does it mean to have a gender. She also revealed something adorable that will make fans of the series smile when they read her graphic novel. Chad Sell talked about how he chose writers for The Cardboard Kingdom based on their own personal experiences that they could bring to the “neighborhood” of stories.

The panel ended in Q and A where an audience member asked about how the creators as adults captured the voices of today’s young people in their comics. Barbara Perez Marquez made the excellent suggestion of having kids or teens like in a public library’s graphic novel or anime club to beta read their scripts and give notes on what they liked about the scripts.

Hotel Dare is a New Magic Kingdom For You to Discover in April 2019

BOOM! Studios has announced Hotel Dare, an all-new original graphic novel (OGN) written by Terry Blas and illustrated by rising talent Claudia Aguirre. Arriving in stores April 2019, this world-hopping fantasy follows Olive and her adopted siblings, Darwin and Charlotte, as they spend their summer with their estranged grandma Mama Lupe at her creepy hotel in Mexico. When their boring chores lead them to discover a secret hiding behind every door of the hotel – thanks to a mysterious ancient mask — the kids are transported to three magical worlds filled with space Pirates, bearded Wizards, and cotton-candied kingdoms. But if they’re gonna save these three worlds from certain jeopardy, they’ll need to embrace the love and acceptance of family…before they tear themselves apart!

Preview: Rick and Morty #32

Rick and Morty #32

(W) Pamela Ribon
(A) Erica Hayes
(C) Katy Farina
(CA) (Cover A) CJ Cannon with Katy Farina, (Cover B) Terry Blas
Age Rating: Teen 16+
Genre: Sci-Fi/Humor
Price: $3.99
Page Count: 32

Special guest issue written by Pamela Ribon (SLAM!, Moana) and illustrated by Erica Hayes (Rick and Morty™ storyboard artist)! Picking up after the events of “Raising Gazorpazorp,” Summer is in possession of a brand-new pink spaceship. After triggering the ship’s AI, Summer grows closer and closer with the ship, embarking on amazing adventures together. But there’s such a thing as too close…

Oni Press Announces Five New Titles for Spring 2018

Oni Press is expanding its line of comics with five new titles to release Spring 2018 including: The Altered History of Willow Sparks by Tara O’Connor, Archival Quality by Ivy Noelle Weir and Steenz, Sci-Fu by Yehudi Mercado, Dead Weight: Murder at Camp Bloom by Terry Blas, Molly Muldoon, and Matthew Seely, and My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon and Cat Farris.

The Altered History of Willow Sparks by Tara O’Connor (January 17)

What happens when you can finally get everything you ever wanted? Willow Sparks and her best friend Georgia Pratt are at the bottom of the social ladder at Twin Pines High School, just trying to get through each day relatively unscathed. But when Willow finds a mysterious book that allows her to literally change her life, it feels like her luck is finally turning. As she becomes more and more popular with each entry into the book, her old life, including her friendship with Georgia, seems miles away. Yet as Willow will discover, every action has a reaction, and the future has unusual—even dangerous—ways of protecting itself.

Tara O’Connor is a New Jersey-based cartoonist. She is the author of Roots, which will be available September 2017 from IDW Publishing’s Top Shelf imprint. This her first graphic novel with Oni Press.

Archival Quality by Ivy Noelle Weir and Steenz (March 7)

After losing her job at the library, Celeste Walden starts working at the haunting Logan Museum as an archivist. But the job may not be the second chance she was hoping for, and she finds herself confronting her mental health, her relationships, and before long, her grasp on reality as she begins to dream of a young woman she’s never met, but feels strangely drawn to. Especially after she asks Cel for help…

As Cel attempts to learn more about the woman, she begins losing time, misplacing things, passing out—the job is becoming dangerous, but she can’t let go of this mysterious woman. Who is she? Why is she so fixated on Cel? And does Cel have the power to save her when she’s still trying to save herself?

Philadelphia-based writer Ivy Noelle Weir and St. Louis-based illustrator Steenz have collaborated on numerous comics projects together including a short for the series Princeless. Steenz’s artwork has been featured in the critically acclaimed and award-winning anthology Elements: Fire, as well as Ham4Pamphlet, a collaborative illustration project inspired by the hit Broadway musical Hamilton, while Weir has written numerous articles for Women Write About Comics, American Libraries magazine, and NoveList in addition to her fiction writing. Both Weir and Steenz have worked both as librarians as well as being involved with The Valkyries, an online group for women who work in comic shops around the world. Archival Quality is their first Oni Press graphic novel.

Sci-Fu by Yehudi Mercado (March 14)
Hip-Hop, Sci-Fi, and Kung Fu all hit the turntables for the mash-up mix of the year! Cartoonist/force of nature Yehudi Mercado sets his sights on 1980s Brooklyn and Wax, a young mix-master who scratches the perfect beat and accidentally summons a UFO that transports his family, best friend, and current crush to the robot-dominated planet of Discopia. Now Wax and his crew must master the intergalactic musical martial art of Sci-Fu to fight the power and save Earth. Word to your mother.

Yehudi Mercado, a Los Angeles-based writer and illustrator, has previously worked on other projects such as Guardians of the Galaxy: The Universal Weapon for Marvel/Disney Interactive, and Rocket Salvage and Pantalones, TX, with BOOM! Studios and their Archaia imprint.

My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon and Cat Farris (April 11)

Nora has bad luck with men. When she meets an (actual) bear on a hike in the Los Angeles hills, he turns out to be the best romantic partner she’s ever had! He’s considerate, he’s sweet, he takes care of her. But he’s a bear, and winning over her friends and family is difficult. Not to mention he has to hibernate all winter. Can true love conquer all?

Pamela Ribon is a best-selling novelist, and has written comics such as Rick and Morty™ for Oni Press and her original series Slam! for BOOM! Studios. After over a decade working in television, she became a member of Disney Animation’s StoryTrust, where she worked on Moana and is currently co-writing the upcoming Ralph Breaks the Internet: Wreck-It Ralph 2. Cat Farris is the creator of the webcomic The Last Diplomat and the minicomic series Flaccid Badger, has worked for companies such as Amazon and Rovio Entertainment, and illustrated Dark Horse Comics’ Emily and the Strangers.

Dead Weight: Murder at Camp Bloom by Terry Blas, Molly Muldoon, and Matthew Seely (April 25)

Deep in the Oregon wilderness sits Camp Bloom, a weight-loss camp where “overweight” teens can “get in shape.” Jesse would rather be anywhere else, but her parents are forcing her to go. Noah isn’t sure if he wants to be there, but it’s too late to turn back. Tony is heartbroken at the thought of giving up his phone and internet. And Kate… well, she likes the hikes, at least. As far as these four teens are concerned, it’s just another boring summer. Until one night, when Jesse and Noah witness a beloved counselor’s murder. The body’s gone by the next morning, but a blurry photo leads to one clue—the murderer is one of the camp’s staff members!

But which one? As Jesse, Noah, Kate, and Tony investigate, they quickly discover that everyone’s got their secrets… and one of them would kill to keep theirs hidden.

Terry Blas’ work has previously appeared on comic book covers for Bravest Warriors, Regular Show, The Amazing World of Gumball, Adventure Time, Rick and Morty™, and The Legend of Bold Riley. Matthew Seely’s animation has previously appeared on MTV’s Greatest Party Story Ever. Molly Muldoon’s current projects include the forthcoming Cardboard Kingdom from Knopf.

Preview: The Amazing World of Gumball 2017 Grab Bag #1

The Amazing World of Gumball 2017 Grab Bag #1

Publisher: KaBOOM!, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writers: Brittany Peer, Terry Blas, Gustavo Borges, Max Davison, Ted Anderson, and Kate Sherron
Artists: Brittany Peer, Terry Blas, Gustavo Borges, Jordan Gibson, Jen Hickman, and Kate Sherron
Cover Artist: Naomi Franquiz
Price: $7.99

It’s a brand-new collection of hilarious shorts from Cartoon Network’s The Amazing World of Gumball!
Elmore Junior High dig up a time capsule from 1987 that unleashes a cloud of germs that turn people into…the 1980s! Plus, Gumball, Darwin, and Anais experience a snow day in the middle of summer, Nicole and Richard’s date night goes horribly awry, and more!

Review: Mama Tits Saves the World #1

Mama Tits Saves the WorldOne of the most important, crowdfunded comics is here and Northwest Press made sure that the backers were not disappointed. If you haven’t heard of Charles “Zan” Christensen‘s new comic Mama Tits Saves the World then let me be the first to tell you that this needs to be in your collection! It is history in the making! Not only does Zan give the reader a fact-filled, informative and fun adventure and Terry Blas‘s artwork gives us something fun to look at. There’s also some fun and games thrown into the mix to educate the reader.

There aren’t a lot of comic books with LGBT characters and usually I applaud the ones where being LGBT isn’t the central issue of the characters. The difference between those and Mama Tits, is that the purpose of this comic book is to educate and entertain, so keeping the LGBT icons and drag queens in the forefront while they fight the oppression and hate is necessary to the story.

The story starts off with Mama Tits enjoying all the progress that the LGBT community has achieved. Unfortunately, she is struck with the reality that there are still bigots in the world and they will protest at any chance they get. Mama Tits calls upon the Queer Pantheon, comprised of great LGBT figures & icons and, uses her special power to unleash the truth. I really respected the fact that the protestors signs weren’t all made to say “I’m in the closet”. There was also an acknowledgment that some people are just hurt people who hurt others. It was refreshing to see that Zan didn’t go with a cop-out or a cliche when battling the bad guys.

In part two of the story, Mama Tits is dispatched to take down two super villains, who you might recognize even though they’re not named. These villains are covered in hypocrisy and within the story itself provides the reader with a glimpse of the ignorance that the LGBT community faces. Somehow in battling the bad guys Mama Tits never manages to feel like Zan is having his characters preach to the choir or convert the bigots. He manages to simply point out the flaws in the logic of most bigots and have the LGBT readers & allies cheer for the wrath of fabulousness that Mama Tits is going to unleash.

If the story isn’t enough to get you on board, Mama Tits even has some fun activity pages in it for the reader that wants to be a little more involved. From cover to cover, Zan lays his brightly colored history (and current events) lesson out in the open. The reader is made aware of the issues that the LGBT community faces. There is a message of perseverance and tolerance that is necessary in today’s political climate. I think that media especially comic books can go a long way in educating the public about important issues and the discrimination that racial and sexual minorities face. Mama Tits manages to not only tell a good story filled with fabulous fight sequences, dastardly villains (based on real life villains) and, beautiful costume changes but, it provides the reader with info that they might not have and calls them to action.

Story: Charles “Zan” Christensen Art: Terry Blas
Story: 9.1 Art: 8.7 Overall: 9.4 Recommendation: Buy

Northwest Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Regular Show #36

Regular Show #36

Publisher: KaBOOM!, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writers: Ulises Farinas & Erick Freitas
Artist: Laura Howell
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Terry Blas
Subscription Cover: Walter Pax, Jen Hickman
Price: $3.99

Conclusion of this story arc! Rigby has realized their heroism competition is a sham, but Mordecai is under the spell of some evil TV heroes and is driving everyone away.

RegularShow_036_A_Main

Mama Tits Saves the World from Northwest Press

Mama Tits Saves the WorldNorthwest Press is getting the word out that fabulous (and famous) drag queen Mama Tits is coming to comics in Mama Tits Saves the World!

Mama Tits made headlines when she confronted antigay protestors at Seattle Pride in 2014.

That fabulous activism inspired Northwest Press publisher Zan Christensen to team up with artists Terry Blas and Marissa Louise to bring Mama to comics.

The publisher has recently launched a funding drive on Indiegogo to cover the printing of the book, artists’ costs, and sending Mama herself to RuPaul’s DragCon to debut the comic! The funding drive runs through May 6th.

Northwest Press is an independent comics publisher that has been producing quality comics exploring the LGBT experience since 2010.

 

 

 

While we’re no longer picking crowd funding projects to spotlight on our site, we’re allowing project creators to make their case for their project on our platform. We remind individuals, we don’t endorse any of these projects, and that by supporting any crowd funding project, you’re taking any risks associated with doing so. – the Management

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