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Check Out These Previews of What We Can Expect From AHOY Comics

Earlier today we brought the news of the launch of AHOY Comics, a new publisher who has already announced four series with an impressive group of creators. Now, we have a look at the actual series that we’ll be able to enjoy starting in September.

THE WRONG EARTH

6 Issue mini-series by Tom Peyer and Jamal Igle

AHOY Comics launches with a biting superhero satire written by Tom Peyer (Captain Kid, Hourman), penciled by Jamal Igle (Black, Supergirl), inked by Juan Castro (Transformers),and colored by Andy Troy. On one world, Dragonflyman and his sidekick Stinger enjoy a life of adventure. On another Earth, the Dragonfly hunts criminal parasites like a lethal exterminator. But what happens when these two heroes change places?

On sale on September 12, 2018, THE WRONG EARTH debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • A  prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: ‘HUD’ HORNET’S HOLIDAY IN HELL, illustrated by best-selling artist Rob Steen
  • A mock “Golden Age” Stinger solo story, by Paul Constant and Frank Cammuso
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler

HIGH HEAVEN

5 Issue Mature Readers mini-series by Tom Peyer and Greg Scott

Chronic malcontent David Weathers dies and goes to Heaven—where everything is terrible, and everybody hates a complainer. HIGH HEAVEN is a savage satire by writer Tom Peyer (Hourman, Batman ’66) with art by Greg Scott (Black Hood, X-Files), colored by Andy Troy.

On sale, September 26, 2018, HIGH HEAVEN’s debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with a cover by Mad Magazine’s Richard Williams and extras including:

  • A HASHTAG: DANGER backup story by Peyer, with art by Chris Giarrusso (G-Man, Mini-Marvels)
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler
  • An all-new prose story by comics legend Grant Morrison: FESTIVE FUNTIMES AT THE NEW WORLD’S FAIR, illustrated by acclaimed artist Rick Geary

In October, AHOY Comics will launch a creator owned title:

CAPTAIN GINGER

4 issue mini series by Stuart Moore and June Brigman

When the human race died out, the cats inherited the Earth! Or at least one starship. Now the intrepid Captain Ginger struggles to keep his fellow felines united against a hostile universe. Thirty-five pages of comic adventure—with a bite—by writer Stuart Moore (Deadpool the Duck, Batman: Noir Alley) artist June Brigman (Power Pack), inker Roy Richardson and colorist Veronica Gandini.

On sale, October 17, 2018, CAPTAIN GINGER’s debut issue is a full color, 48 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • An all-new text story by comics legend Grant Morrison: THE ELECTRIC SKY BEAR THAT INSPIRED BEN FRANKLIN, illustrated by Phil Hester
  • A cartoon by Shannon Wheeler

October will also see the debut of an all star anthology series:

EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR

6 issue Mature Readers mini series

EDGAR ALLAN POE mangles classic tales and brand new stories in this cross between Drunk History and Tales from the Crypt! First, meet AHOY’s own alcohol-damaged version of Poe in The Facts in The Case of M. Valdemar, adapted by Tom Peyer (Batman ‘66) and drawn by Fred Harper. Then: Sugary cereal meets vampirism in Dark Chocolate, by writer Mark Russell (The Flintstones) and artist Peter Snejbjerg (Starman).

On sale, October 31, 2018, EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR’s debut issue is a full color, 40 page comic book magazine retailing for $3.99, with extras including:

  • Hunt Emerson’s take on The Black Cat
  • Unsettling verse by Cienna Madrid illustrated by Carly Wright

Should We Expect More from Comics? New Publisher AHOY Promises Exactly That.

This falls sees the launch of a brand new comic publisher AHOY Comics who already boasts an impressive lineup of creators involved. Founded by journalist Hart Seely, the publisher already has landed Grant Morrison, Mark Russell, Jamal Igle, and more. Tom Peyer is the Editor-in-Chief and will also be contributing a series and Stuart Moore is described as AHOY’s “dark ops” manager. AHOY stands for Abundance (more pages per issue), Humor, Originality and Yes (Yes to comics, more pages, collected editions, meaningful design, dramatic art, shipping on schedule, enjoyment, etc).

Seely said the releases aren’t so much issues as “comic book magazines” which will feature a full-length lead story and back-up material including cartoons, prose, and poetry from mainstream and indie creators, as well as journalists, prose writers, and New Yorker cartoonists. Seely is an award-winning reporter for the Syracuse Post-Standard. His humor and satire have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, National Lampoon, and on National Public Radio. He is the editor of Pieces of Intelligence: The Existential Poetry of Donald H. Rumsfeld and coeditor (with Tom Peyer) of O Holy Cow! The Selected Verse of Phil Rizzuto.

The publisher launches this September with two series. The Wrong Earth is a six-issue miniseries by Tom Peyer and Jamal Igle. In it, two heroes — one an adventure-loving crimefighter with a kid sidekick, the other a ruthless vigilante — trade places and find themselves trapped in worlds they never made. In High Heaven, a five-issue mini-series aimed at mature readers, Tom Peyer and Greg Scott debut a chronic malcontent who finds himself in an afterlife where everyone hates a complainer. The Wrong Earth debuts September 12.

Both of those series launch with 40 page first issues. The Wrong Earth features a prose story by Grant Morrison along with material from Shannon Wheeler, Paul Constant, and Frank CammusoHigh Heaven features another prose story from Morrison, with another cartoon from Wheeler and a back-up strip from Peyer and artist Chris Giarrusso.

In October AHOY launches two additional titles: Edgar Allan Poe’s Snifter of Terror, a six-issue anthology described as a “cross between Drunk History and Tales from the Crypt . That 40 page first issue features material by Peyer, Mark Russell and cartoonist Hunt Emerson. Captain Ginger is a four-issue series about a spaceship piloted by cats after the human race has died out, by Stuart Moore and June Brigman. That first issue will include a prose story by Morrison, illustrated by Phil Hester, and a cartoon from Shannon Wheeler.

Future creators involved include Peter Milligan, Mariah McCourt, Rachel Pollack, Gary Erskine, and Roger Stern.

Review: The 99: Sacrifice

Within the medium of comics, no one gets death as deftly as sequential art does. Books, can portray a death quite convincingly, describing every detail, as if you were in the room. Movies and tv shows, do it well too, as they show the viewer visually and sometimes not, what occurs. As the death of a beloved character, can make the audience gasp or cheer.

This last season of Game Of Thrones, saw the death of Littlefinger, a villain within the books and the TV show, who seemingly was behind every sea change within Westeros. Then in the recent storyline of Detective Comics, saw the death of Clayface, a once hated but now redeemed character, that divides Bat Family. Either way, much like in life, when one person is so attached to other’s lives, their fatality can be devastating. In this newest volume of The 99, every wielder of the Noor stones face a sacrifice or a demise of someone close.

Dr. Ramzi,  at the beginning of the book, asks every member what personal sacrifice each undertook before they discovered their powers. One of the wielders talks about how each got sold in to child slavery but got turned into a cold-blooded killer and receives the Noor stones this way. Another finds one of the heroes finding his powers through being bullied and almost killing someone. By book’s end, the giving up of something or someone in this book, shows the true measure of a hero.

Overall, this feels like the “After School Special” of the series, which can be good, but this team has told better stories. Stuart Moore and Fabian Nicieza feels seral in this book, which is not exemplary of the series. The art by the different artists is the one consistency from the rest of the series that is in this volume. Altogether, the series has done better than this volume, skip this one and find the rest.

Story: Stuart Moore and Fabian Nicieza
Art: Ron Wagner, Joe Rubinstein, Paco Diaz, Chris Schons, Steven Yeowell, Kevin Kobasic, Don Hudson, Mark Buckingham and Steve Buccelato
Story: 5.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Review: The 99: Futures

Genre television has been around for decades, but the gap in quality has only gotten better in the last few years. I remember as a kid growing up, watching Adam West’s Batman, on the television, just about every afternoon.  It was fun watching the Dark Knight, before he was so dark, he was all business, but family friendly. I also remember watching the Incredible Hulk, a much sedate heartfelt version not only the big Green guy also of Bruce Banner.

As both of these examples still hold a special place in most fans hearts, it is hard for most of those fans to see how unfaithful these shows were to canon of both of these characters. In recent years, a lot of these characters including the Dark Knight, a la Gotham, has their stories told much more in step with what is canon.  This why I am pretty obsessed with The Gifted, as this shows a world after the X-Men, and is pretty close to how the world is, as it was portrayed in X men: Days of Future Past. This is what this particular issue of The 99 reminds me of, entitled Futures.

As the team gets caught up in a trap, Hadya, The Guide, gets seriously injured, Dr.Hamzi, becomes desperate to know what lies ahead. He summons Aleem The All Knowing, to soothsay all the possible futures the team may encounter. As each future is revealed, one direr than the other, and each could be changed with one decision. By book’s end, each team member sees as long as every decision counts.

Overall, a great issue in the series, a mix of Quantum Leap and Sliders. The story by Naif Al-Mutawa and Stuart Moore is funny, and action packed. The art by Joe Rubinstein and Ron Wagner is beautiful. Altogether, a great book, that lets the world see POC characters in spaces that they would otherwise not been seen.

Story: Naif Al-Mutawa and Stuart Moore Art: Joe Rubinstein and Ron Wagner
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: The 99: Beginnings

Hari Kondabolu recently made a documentary about one of the world ‘s recognizable, as well as its most stereotypical characters ever in animation, Apu. The very fact that the character is not voiced by someone of Indian decent, is a tradition, that goes back as old as the artform itself. As some people know that the character of Cleveland Brown on Family Guy is not voiced by an African American actor. The difference between Cleveland and Apu is not that one is more problematic than the other, but it is a matter of quantity.

In Kondabolu’s documentary, “The Problem with Apu,” most the interview subjects who grew up in America, expose the world to what most to of us know, Apu is not representative of any experience by any South Asian American. He also exposes, a systemic issue, one where every South Asian American, growing up, is identified with this character, one where the actor himself, refuses to even be interviewed for. The movie drives home that representation matters and that applies to all art forms. So, when I heard a bout a few years back, of The 99, I was intrigued to read this book about Muslim superheroes.

We are introduced to Dr. Ramzi Razem, who as a child discovered the Noor Stones, and the power they held, while visiting Spain. Years later, he became obsessed with finding al 99 of them, which were spread across the globe, and just each stone carried a unique power, it required a unique individual to possess it and wield its power. The reader gets to find out how each member of the 99 comes to find their own stone, and how they found their synergy with it. By book’s end, Razem, has assembled an awesome fighting force, that has to be ready for the war that is coming.

Overall, a great book that shows diversity matters and that great stories can come form anywhere in the world. The story by Naif Al-Mutawa and Stuart Moore is intricate, adventurous, and fun. The art by June Brigman, Albert Deschesne, Monica Kubina, Roy Richardson, and Dan Panosian is gorgeous. Altogether, a great book to a new universe that looks like the world.

Story: Naif Al-Mutawa and Stuart Moore
Art: June Brigman, Albert Deschesne, Monica Kubina, Roy Richardson, Dan Panosian

Story: 9.0 Art: 8.4 Overall: 9.1 Recommendation: BUY

Preview: Deadpool the Duck #5

Deadpool the Duck #5

(W) Stuart Moore (A) Jacopo Camagni (CA) David Nakayama
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Mar 15, 2017
SRP: $3.99

Howard and Deadpool have finally learned how to control their shared body! Just in time, too, as they’ve got an even bigger challenge to face… getting their own bodies back!

Preview: Deadpool the Duck #3 (of 5)

Deadpool the Duck #3 (of 5)

(W) Stuart Moore (A) Jacopo Camagni (CA) David Nakayama
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Feb 08, 2017
SRP: $3.99

Rocket Raccoon? Roxxon? Where are Wade Wilson and Howard the Duck? On a mission to get their own bodies back, of course! Deadpool the Duck is in over his head (tail feathers?) in this out-of-world adventure!

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Preview: Deadpool the Duck #2

Deadpool the Duck #2

(W) Stuart Moore (A) Jacopo Camagni (CA) David Nakayama
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Jan 18, 2017
SRP: $3.99

What do you get when you take one cynical anthropomorphic duck (named Howard) and cross it with the smelliest (and most annoying) mercenary in the Marvel Universe? DEADPOOL THE DUCK! When Deadpool is sent on a mission from S.H.I.E.L.D. to capture a high-profile E.T. that is rampaging across the high plains, the snatch-and-grab turns out to be much more complicated than the Merc with a Mouth anticipated. One unfortunate wrong-place-at-the-wrong-time accident later leaves Deadpool and Howard fighting for control of the cutest mercenary the Marvel Universe has ever seen! Brought to you with words by Stuart Moore (CLOAK & DAGGER, THANOS: DEATH SENTENCE Novel) and art by Jacopo Camagni (DEADPOOL’S SECRET SECRET WARS).

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Review: Deadpool The Duck #1

deadpool_the_duck__1Sometimes I think that Marvel are milking Deadpool for everything he’s worth, plus a little bit more; case in point Deadpool The Duck. I can think of no reason for Marvel to mix Deadpool and Howard the Duck, but as a Howard fan who can take or leave Deadpool, I was curious to see the inevitable train wreck that would result from their combination as it happened.

Upon opening the comic, it seemed even Marvel were unsure as they “haphazardly present” the story to you, the reader. Needless to say, my expectations were pretty low, and I could hear the train starting to derail.

And yet the train never left the tracks.

Deadpool The Duck #1 wasn’t anywhere close to being the train wreck that I expected. The Deadpool bits will feel familiar to anybody who has read anything featuring him in the last year or so (and there’s been a lot of that, so I’m sure you have some familiarity), and the sections featuring Howard were as biting as I hoped they’d be. Artistically, the comic is solid, and here the depiction of Howard is another highlight.

The only issue I have is how long it takes from the initial set up of the joining of Howard and Deadpool to the act itself – we clearly know it’s going to happen, so why take your time doing it?

Story: Stuart Moore Art: Jacopo Camangi Colours: Israel Silva
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read
(But if you’re a fan of either character, buy it. I think this’ll be a solid series once it gets going)

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Deadpool the Duck #1

Deadpool the Duck #1

(W) Stuart Moore (A) Jacopo Camagni (CA) David Nakayama
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Jan 04, 2017
SRP: $3.99

What do you get when you take one cynical anthropomorphic duck (named Howard) and cross it with the smelliest (and most annoying) mercenary in the Marvel Universe? DEADPOOL THE DUCK! When Deadpool is sent on a mission from S.H.I.E.L.D. to capture a high-profile E.T. that is rampaging across the high plains, the snatch-and-grab turns out to be much more complicated than the Merc with a Mouth anticipated. One unfortunate wrong-place-at-the-wrong-time accident later leaves Deadpool and Howard fighting for control of the cutest mercenary the Marvel Universe has ever seen! Brought to you with words by Stuart Moore (CLOAK & DAGGER, THANOS: DEATH SENTENCE Novel) and art by Jacopo Camagni (DEADPOOL’S SECRET SECRET WARS).

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