Tag Archives: ryan cody

Louis Southard, David Hahn, Ryan Cody, Buddy Beaudoin, and Kalman Andrasofszky take us to the Midnight Western Theatre

During a time when it’s kill or be killed, a peculiar duo of adventurers come face-to-face with the dark and disturbing things that inhabit the wild west.

Welcome to the Midnight Western Theatre! Our feature presentation is a series of tales spanning across the turbulent 1860’s of the United States of America. It is a time where rights have been wronged! Where the guilty plague the innocent! Where man and beast have little difference! HOWEVER, the new frontier has far more dangerous threats than the folly of man! Threats that are MYSTERIOUS!!! STRANGE!!! DEADLY!!! In such a chaotic era, who is brave enough to face these most dastardly beings? Enter our heroes, The Woman In Black and her right-hand man, Alexander Wortham! Together, they must confront what no one else can on this journey of blood, betrayal, and self-discovery!

Midnight Western Theatre is by writer Louis Southard, artist David Hahn, colorist Ryan Cody, letterer Buddy Beaudoin, and features Kalman Adrasofszky. It’s out this March from Scout Comics.

Midnight Western Theatre

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Family Tree #2 and Family Tree #3 Get New Printings

Image Comics has fast-tracked reprints of both Family Tree issues #2 and #3 by Eisner Award winning Jeff Lemire and Phil Hester in order to keep up with the frenzied fan enthusiasm for the bestselling body horror title.

In Family Tree #2, Loretta and her family are surrounded by deadly cultists and running out of time when Grandpa Judd arrives toting his ornery attitude and his trusty shotgun. But what good is a gun against a mysterious ailment turning his granddaughter into a tree?

In Family Tree #3, the characters follow a lead into the dark alleys of New York City’s Chinatown in search of a cure, while Meg begins to embrace her burgeoning transformation.

Family Tree #3, second printing (Diamond Code DEC198679) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, February 26.

Family Tree #2, second printing (Diamond Code DEC198678) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, February 26.

Family Tree #1 (Diamond Code SEP190021) is available at comic book shops now.

Family Tree #2, second printing
Family Tree #3, second printing

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Pride Vol. 1

Growing up as a cinephile, I loved watching 70s movies especially those starring a young femme fatale named Pam Grier. The way she commanded he screen had just about every man in my family grinning from ear to ear. As years went by I saw an older yet still very much attractive actor in movies when she played a supporting character but that smile still got every man that was in her presence. So, it was pretty much kismet, when I found out she was going to be in a TV show on Showtime, The L Word.

I went into the show because of Grier but came out of the show, a massive fan, of the characters, the stories, and the culture, as it opened my eyes to a world I never knew existed. As the show explored the many intricacies surrounding sexual identity and the discrimination that women and any person who identifies as LGBTQ face daily. This opened my eyes to just how marginalized they were, or rarely they see themselves reflected in the arts without the utilization of stereotypes, especially comics. It was only within the past few years, comics have started to delve into telling these narratives with standouts being the superior Sunstone and the gone too soon Midnighter. Another standout that I came across was Joe Glass’ The Pride, which revolve around a team of superheroes who just so happens to be LGBTQ.

In the opening pages we meet a well-meaning superhero, Fab-Man, who is openly gay and who is not taken as seriously as his cisgender counterparts. This leads him to create his own, his “Justice League” full of LGBTQ superheroes who fight injustice as well as they face villains who are homophobic and evil and struggle to find a synergy to work with each other. One of the standout stories is “You Think You’re a Man,” one of our heroes finds out he has a son and a one of the villains has kidnapped him, leading our heroes to a trap which looks to silences one member forever. In “It Gets Better,” Fab Man talks a young boy who wants to commit suicide after being harassed because he was gay. In the last standout story, we get the origin of “Muscle Mary,” a warrior who can do battle with anyone but who originally came to the world of men, to avenge a death, but eventually came to defend mortals.

Overall, The Pride is a comic which shows that heroes are never black and white and usually contain multitudes of layers. Some times those layers is what makes you extraordinary. The stories by the different writers is well developed, smart, and exciting. Th art by the different artists complement the stories well. Altogether, a strong book.

Story: Joe Glass, PJ Montgomery, Mike Garley
Art: Kris Anka, Kris Carter, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barros, Nathan Ashworth, Ben Wilsonham, Mike Stock, Ricardo Bessa, Gavin Mitchell, Maxime Garbarini, Dan Harris, Ryan Cody, Christian Wildgoose and Cory Smith
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Doc Unknown Protects Gate City at Dark Horse

Dark Horse has announced the hardcover collection of Doc Unknown, a pulp action comic by Fabian Rangel Jr. and Ryan Cody. The Complete Doc Unknown contains Doc Unknown Volumes 1–3, the Boss Snake one-shot, and pinups by Mike Mignola, Eric Powell, and more.

Hailed as “one of the very best indie comics series ever made,” Doc Unknown follows Warren Williams, a fighter pilot during World War II who crashes his plane and is taken in and trained by the warrior monks of the secret temple of Min-Yao. After a Nazi ambush, Warren returns to Gate City as Doc Unknown, a mysterious man fighting for good. Doc Unknown must protect Gate City from ruthless gangsters, monstrous mobsters, possessed museum attractions, evil secret societies, vampire ninjas, vengeful ghosts, hypnotizing fish-women, and much more!

The hardcover The Complete Doc Unknown goes on sale July 19, 2017.

the-complete-doc-unknown

Preview: The King Collection

The King Collection

writers: Ben Acker, Ben Blacker, Roger Langridge, Paul Tobin, Nate Cosby, Ben McCool, Brian Clevinger, Jeff Parker
artists: Richard Case, Ryan Cody, Felipe Cunha, Lee Ferguson, Tadd Galusha, Scott Godlewski, Sandy Jarrell, Marc Laming, Ivan Rodriguez, Ron Salas, Brent Schoonover, Jeremy Treece
cover: Darwyn Cooke
FC • 496 pages • $49.99 • Teen+

COLLECTS KING: FLASH GORDON #1-4, KING: MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN #1-4, KING: THE PHANTOM #1-4, KING JUNGLE JIM #1-4, AND KING: PRINCE VALIANT #1-4

When Ming the Merciless launched an all-out assault on planet Earth, the colorful band of heroes known as Kings Watch led the resistance… and triumphed! Now, across the cosmos, in the dark corners of our very planet, and even throughout time, Earth’s defenders continue the mission, separate and yet together in spirit! Flash Gordon, Dale Arden, Dr. Zarkov, Mandrake the Magician, Jungle Jim, Lothar (in his identity as the new Phantom), and Prince Valiant join friends new and old to face the combined forces of Ming and the all-new, all-deadly Cobra!

KingCollectionCov-QualibreB

Preview: King: The Phantom #4

King: The Phantom #4

Brian Clevinger (w)
Ryan Cody (a)
Jonathan Lau (c)
Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen+
FANS, ASK YOUR RETAILER FOR THE:
Jonathan Lau B/W Artretailer incentive cover
Stephen Downey Exclusive Art retailer incentive cover
Stephen Downey B/W Art retailer incentive cover

The Phantom x 2! The new Walker heir has (begrudgingly) accepted the purple, just in time for final showdown with Singh and his entire organization! There will be lots. And lots. And lots and lots and LOTS of bad guys with skull ring scars on their faces.

KingPhantom04-Cov-A-Lau

Review: King: The Phantom #4

KingPhantom04-Cov-A-Lau

I consider myself a fairly big fan of the Phantom, and  as such I was excited to get to read this comic. Although it is the 4th issue in the series, it also makes an ideal jumping on point for new readers as the story isn’t bogged down with refferences to the three comics I hadn’t read before. As to why I hadn’t read them before? I somehow always seem to miss solicitations of comics, and as such if I don’t see a comic on the rack, there’s a good chance I’ll the fact that it was released. So with the King: Phantom series, the first time I became aware or the series was the review copy provided by Dynamite Entertainment.

The prologue is written and drawn by a different creative team than the main story, Jeff Parker and Marc Laming, it’s a very solid build up to the main story.

After the events of the prologue we’re left with, for lack of a better term, a Team Phantom. King: Phantom #4 tells the story of the teams first mission together, and is very well written, but I personally preferred the feel of the prologue art to the main story, but your mileage may vary. Clevinger’s story is a well paced thriller that’s surprisingly enjoyable. Surprisingly enjoyable, because I wasn’t a huge fan of the comic after the prologue.

It’s a good comic, don’t get me wrong, and I did enjoy it, but it wasn’t what I hoped it would be, which is probably as strnge to read as it was to write. It was a good comic, but it wasn’t the best Phantom comic I’ve ever read. Personally, I wasn’t a huge fan of Team Phantom, and had the story been told with a different lead character then I have no doubt I’d be singing it’s praises. But, as a Phantom story, it just didn’t speak to me.

To be clear, my reservations about the story are specific to my preconceived ideas about the character of The Phantom; there is a very good chance that another reader will enjoy the combination of the plot and the Phantom mythology, but it wasn’t for me. Hopefully, if you do choose to read it then you will enjoy the comic more than I did.

Although King: Phantom #4 didn’t resonate with me as a Phantom story, at the end of the day, Brian Clevinger and Ryan Cody still produced a good action story that’s worth reading.

Story: Brian Clevinger, Jeff Parker (Prologue) Art: Ryan Cody, Marc Laming (Prologue)
Story: 6.75 Art: 7.50 Overall: 7.25 Recommendation: Read

Dynamite Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Also published on Ramblings Of A Comics Fan

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