Tag Archives: nancy collins

Vampirella #1969 Rare Robert Hack “Black & White” Edition

Vampirella #1969 Rare Robert Hack “Black & White” Edition

Writer: Nancy Collins, Eric Trautmann, Phil Hester, Mark Rahner, David Walker
Art: Fritz Casas, Brett Weldele, Jethro Morales, Colton Worley, Aneke
Cover: Robert Hack “Black & White”
$69.99 • Teen +

With a timeless art style perfectly suited to this special celebration of Vampirella’s long career, Robert Hack (of the Chilling Adventures of Sabrina fame) presents his exceptional ink wash art for this super-rare “Black & White” variant edition. Dynamite Entertainment proudly presents a special, oversized issue celebrating those heady days with a who’s who from their roister of all-star writers and artists! Just look at this line-up: Nancy Collins joined by artist Fritz Casas, Eric Trautmann joined by painter Brett Weldele, Phil Hester joined by artist Jethro Morales, Mark Rahner joined by artist Colton Worley and David Walker joined by artist Aneke! Each presents a special tale showcasing the best of the former horror hostess from Drakulon!

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Preview: Vampirella 1969

Vampirella 1969

writers: Nancy Collins, Phil Hester, Mark Rahner, Eric Trautmann, David Walker
artists: Aneke , Fritz Casas, Jethro Morales, Colton Worley, Brett Weldele
covers: Robert Hack (a), Jack Jadson (b)
Fans & retailers, order the cover of your choice!
FC • 48 pages • $7.99 • Teen+

Vampirella first appeared on the scene in 1969 and quickly became a fixture of comics, horror and pop culture! Now, Dynamite Entertainment proudly presents a special, over-sized issue celebrating those heady days with a who’s who from their roister of all-star writers and artists! Just look at this line-up: Nancy Collins joined by artist Fritz Casas, Eric Trautmann joined by painter Brett Weldele, Phil Hester joined by artist Jethro Morales, Mark Rahner joined by artist Colton Worley, and David Walker joined by artist Aneke! Each presents a special tale showcasing the best of the former horror hostess from Drakulon!

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Review: She Makes Comics

she-makes-comicsAs a literary critic and cultural historian with both feminist and queer-ally persuasions, I am often frustrated by the type of historical revisionism that provides the history of a marginalized group by telling their story as adjunct or incidental to “mainstream” or “normative” history. Such scholarship marginalizes the narratives of oppressed groups in the very attempt to recover their histories.

I was thankfully relieved, then, to enjoy the hour-plus-long documentary She Makes Comics, directed by Marisa Stotter and made by Sequart Organization in association with Respect! Films. This documentary does what very little of comics scholarship (and journalism) has been able to achieve: it narrates the story of women comics creators, editors, and readers through dozens of personal interviews (see a list of interviewees below), incorporating them as central to the history of the comics industry while highlighting individual creators’ push toward greater inclusion and respectability in a medium largely controlled by men.

She Makes Comics begins with an opening montage of interviews in which creators Kelly Sue DeConnick, Chondra Echert, Wendy Pini, Gail Simone, and others speak to the importance of the comics medium for female creators and readers. Particularly powerful is DeConnick’s declaration that “representation in comics is absolutely vital,” followed by the injunction that “we need to celebrate the women who work in comics and who have always worked in comics, and we need to go back and find their stories and bring them to the fore” (00:55-01:07). DeConnick bring an absolute necessity to the project of reclaiming the history of women in comics.

DeConnick’s spirited call drives Stotter’s She Makes Comics as it traverses the editorial bull-pens, creator biographies, convention floors, retail spaces, and four-color universes that make up the world(s) of comics. The documentary begins by establishing the medium’s long history of female readership in comics strips of the late 19th century and the early 20th century, pointing at the same time to the generous number of female comics strip creators, including Jackie Ormes and Nell Brinkley. Trina Robbins reminds us that “nobody at that time thought, ‘Oh how unusual! She draws comics!'” Despite the comparative preponderance of women in comics in the early 20th century, a cultural moment that abounded in strong women heroes and adventurers (and with a 55% female readership!), the “comics crusade” of the early 1950s began by Frederic Wertham resulted in the Comics Code Authority. The CCA significantly reduced the type and quality of comics produced, and the documentary makes the very brief argument that the “sanitization” of comics led to a boom in the masculinity-celebrating superhero genre and a subsequent decline in female readership.

The documentary then tracks the work of Ramona Fradon at DC and of Marie Severin at Marvel in the 1960s, transitioning rather quickly to the misogynist, cliquey underground comix scene of the 1960s and 1970s, where creators such as Trina Robbins and Joyce Farmer carved out a feminist space for comics. As Robbins recalls, “if you wanted to do underground comix [with the male creators] you had to do comics in which women were raped and tortured. You know, horrible things!” But in the pages of feminist comix and zines creators were allowed the freedom to depict women from women’s point of view—points of view that occasionally had legal repercussions.

The remainder of She Makes Comics focuses heavily on the history of women creators in comics from the mid-1970s to the present, owing both to the interviewees’ considerable experiences in the period following the late 1970s and to the growing visibility of female readers and creators. Particular highlights include the description of early comic book conventions and the fan scene, which Paul Levitz describes as 90/10 men/women. Creators and fans like Jill Thompson and Wendy Pini bring their personal fan and creator experiences to bear on this unique moment in comics fandom history. Wendy Pini’s entrance into fandom via her (in)famous Red Sonja cosplaying is historicized and linked directly to her entrance into the comics industry as writer and, later, creator of Elfquest. For those with an interest in cosplay, Pini’s Sonja is marked as the beginning of an opening up of convention competitions to women, and the documentary subsequently details the critical importance of cosplay to fandom, to female fans, and to creators.

The documentary also gives considerable attention to Chris Claremont’s run on Uncanny X-Men, uniquely noting the considerable influence of Louise Simonson and Ann Nocenti as Claremont’s editors on one of the most famous runs in comic book history. Interviews by female fans, creators, editors, and retailers highlight the importance that Claremont’s X-Men saga had to marginalized groups, with a number of interviewees describing the “mutant metaphor” as particularizable to women’s experiences in geek culture.

The documentary also gives attention to particular auteurs such as Kelly Sue DeConnick and Gail Simone, as well as the editor Karen Berger, who founded DC’s Vertigo imprint at a fairly young age in the early 1990s. She Makes Comics points especially to the rise of the independent comics scene in the 1990s and its boom in the contemporary moment, especially in the form of Image’s new-found success, as a meter for the rising prominence of women comics creators and a female (but also queer and non-white) comics readership. Anyone who reads Image comics regularly knows that its creators do not shy away from feminist themes even while Wonder Women is avowedly “not feminist.”

She Makes Comics ultimately signifies that a change in the comics industry has occurred, albeit slowly, in favor of greater inclusion and representation of women and other oppressed minorities. Despite this, the documentary comes dangerously close to assuming that all the good that needs doing, has been done, asserting a stance that suggests a triumphant growth of women in comics (or as readers) as a victory over patriarchy. While I do agree that strides have been made, as my articles on Wonder Woman and Neko Case show, I don’t think we can ever be complacent. She Makes Comics reifies “women” as a singular, almost non-intersectional category and in doing so creates a narrative of emerging possibilities for that monolithic category without discussing the many and complex factors that continue to challenge, harangue, and complicate both women’s participation in comics and women’s representation. There is, in fairness, a brief moment in which Marjorie Liu speaks about using her position to empower women of color, though its importance is overshadowed by its anecdotal treatment.

She Makes Comics has very few shortcomings and is ultimately a treasure trove of information that is otherwise spread across thousands of online or print media articles, books, and interviews. Marissa Stotter and her crew, in collaborations with a riot (isn’t that what mainstream media calls a gathering of political dissenters?) of talented creators and fans, have made a unique contribution to the history of women in comics. I challenge academics and journalist, myself included, to heed Kelly Sue DeConnick’s introductory injunction with a critical eye to the politics of representation. If we could get a few books about gender politics in comics that aren’t solely about masculinity, that’d be a start.

Interviewees listed in the order that I happened to write them down (after I realized it would be good to write them all down): Marjorie Liu, Nancy GoldsteinTrina Robbins, Ramona Fradon, Janelle Asselin, Heidi MacDonald, Paul Levitz, Michelle Nolan, Alan Kistler, Karen Green, Ann Nocenti, Chris Claremont, Colleen Doran, Joyce Farmer, Wendy Pini, Jackie Estrada, Jill Thompson, Lauren Bergman, Team Unicorn, Chondra Echert, Jill Pantozzi, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Gail Simone, Colleen Coover, Holly Interlandi, Blair Butler, Louise Simonson, Jenna Busch, Amy Dallen, G. Willow Wilson, Tiffany Smith, Jenette Kahn, Shelly Bond, Karen Berger, Joan of Dark, Brea Grant, Joan Hilty, Lea Hernandez, Christina Blanch, Liz Schiller (former Friends of Lulu Board of Directors member), Andrea Tsurumi, Miss Lasko-Gross, Molly Ostertag, Hope Larson, Amy Chu, Nancy Collins, Ariel Schrag, Raina Telgemeier, Miriam Katin, Felicia Henderson, Carla Speed McNeil, Shannon Watters, Jennifer Cruté, Nicole Perlman, Kate Leth, Portlyn Polston (owner of Brave New World Comics), Autumn Glading (employee of Brave New World Comics), and Zoe Chevat.

You can purchase She Makes Comics on Sequart’s website for as low as $9.99. If you ask me, it’s a fantastic deal.

Sequart Organization provided Graphic Policy with a free copy for review.

SDCC 2013: Dynamite Taps Top Female Talent for Legends of Red Sonja

RSvol2LogoThe Dynamite San Diego Comic-Con announcements keep on coming. Following on the immense success of the newly launched Red Sonja ongoing series by Gail Simone, is launching Legends of Red Sonja, a prestige miniseries, an extravaganza celebrating the iconic fantasy heroine’s long and storied career.  Legends of Red Sonja is a collaborative effort uniting Simone with a star-studded and prestigious creative team including Marjorie M. Liu, Mercedes Lackey, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Rhianna Pratchett, Leah Moore, Tamora Pierce, Blair Butler, Nancy Collins, Meljean Brook, Nicola Scott, Devin Grayson, and more to be announced.  Frank Thorne, one of the key artists responsible for defining the character’s distinct look, will be among the artists to contribute cover artwork, as will Jay Anacleto.

The idea spun out of this week’s Red Sonja relaunch. For that series, the covers were provided by the industry’s top female talent. This is the next logical step, having an all-star all female writing team as well.

The structure of the Legends of Red Sonja prestige series will be, in Simone’s words:

…a braided story, with individual, unique stories written by titans of comics, prose, and the gaming world.  These are all powerful voices whose work I adore.  Dynamite asked me to make a list of the women I’d love to see included, and again, I was astounded at the eager responses!  We have giants of the fantasy and horror prose world; Tamora Pierce, Nancy Collins, Mercedes Lackey, and Meljean Brook. We have some of the hottest comics talents; Marjorie M. Liu, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Leah Moore, Devin Grayson and (in her first published story as a writer) Nicola Scott.  And we have brilliant writers from games and television; Rhianna Pratchett and Blair Butler.  Getting to hand-pick this crew of fierce women was an absolute joy, and the fun of it is, we’re all fans of Red Sonja, and of each other.  Throwing ideas back and forth and shaping the stories has been some of the most fun I’ve ever had in comics.  I can’t wait for people to read these takes on Red Sonja…some are funny, some are scary, some are very different versions of Sonja than we are familiar with!

Many of Gail Simone’s hand-picked contributors have shared their excitement about the project:

Rhianna Pratchett:

I treasured my Red Sonja poster when I was kid.  So to get the opportunity to write a story for the character, and to do it in the company of such extraordinary, talented women, is a dream come true.  My younger self is definitely high-fiving my older self.

Leah Moore:

It’s not everyday that Gail Simone asks me to write Red Sonja.  To be honest, I’m glad, because when it happened, I had to be peeled off the ceiling.  Writing Red Sonja has been a personal ambition of mine for a long time.  She is about the most fun a writer can have.  She’s a loner, a grouch, a badass, and is apparently impervious to cold.  I am almost too excited about this project to actually write the thing, which is counter-productive, really.

Tamora Pierce:

This is the coolest project ever: new stories crafted by some of the best writers and artists out there, about a woman warrior created by one of my literary idols, Robert E. Howard, spearheaded by my comics goddess, Gail Simone.  I’m honored to be a part of this, and can’t wait to see the whole thing.  It will be a ground-breaking, multilayered view of a character who has been brawling through comics for decades!

Blair Butler:

I’m honored and exceedingly intimidated to be included in this group of talented creators.  Gail Simone is amazing — and her take on Red Sonja is something I’ve been looking forward to since it was announced way back at Emerald City Comic-Con.  So when she asked me to contribute, I agreed immediately, even though I’m totally nervous about it.

Nancy Collins:

I am thrilled to have been chosen by Gail Simone to participate in Legends of Red Sonja.  I remember how excited I was when I plucked Conan the Barbarian #23 off the spinner rack as a kid, all those years ago, and finally saw a female hero capable of dishing it out with the best of them.  I am honored to have been given this chance to add to Red Sonja’s mythos.

Meljean Brook:

I’m absolutely thrilled to be writing a story for the she-devil, Red Sonja.  I first encountered Red Sonja in the movie with Nielsen and Schwarzenegger when I was about eight years old — and I know that movie isn’t without its problems, but it’s almost impossible to describe how incredible it was to watch a film in which the heroine was just as strong and as tough as the muscle-bound hero.  I loved that she was arrogant, skilled, and never wimped out or waited for rescue, and I immediately went out in search of similar stories about her.  Red Sonja was a revelation to eight-year-old me, and I can trace many of the heroines I write today back to those roots.

IDW Publishing Exclusives and Events for San Diego Comic-Con 2010

Official Press Release

IDW Publishing Exclusives and Events for
San Diego Comic-Con 2010

Top creators, hot exclusives, engaging panels

Booth #2643

[Rocketeer Artists Edition cover]San Diego, CA (July 17, 2010) – In the company’s first San Diego Comic Con appearance as a premier publisher, IDW Publishing will offer an exciting and diverse array of creator signings, exclusives and panels. For complete and up to date information, please visit IDWPublishing.com/SDCC.

Throughout the convention, IDW’s booth #2643 will host such headlining creators as Michael Chiklis (Pantheon), Berkeley Breathed (Bloom County), Joe R. Lansdale, Peter S. Beagle (The Last Unicorn), Scott Morse, Steve Niles, and the creative teams for True Blood, Star Trek, TRANSFORMERS, G.I. JOE and more. Visit IDWPublishing.com/SDCC for a full schedule.

Exclusive items available only from IDW run the gamit from a David Messina wrap around cover for True Blood #1 to a special 100th Anniversary Krazy & Ignatz “Tiger Tea” mug, and include The Rocketeer Artist Edition, Doctor Who #13 photo cover, Joe R. Lansdale’s new novella, “Dread Island,” signed Locke & Key Ghost keys, to name a few. Visit IDWPublishing.com/SDCC for a complete list.

Take a break from the show floor to participate in IDW’s insightful panels featuring discussions with a bevy of talented creators. On Thursday, IDW’s chief creative officer Chris Ryall moderates a panel on transforming film properties into comics, with David Tischman, Max Allan Collins, Mike Johnson, Peter David, Tony Lee and Scott Tipton (4-5 pm, Room 9).

On Friday, IDW editors Andy Schmidt and Denton Tipton treat fans to an in-depth look at what’s coming for TRANSFORMERS, G.I. JOE and Dungeons & Dragons (12 noon-1 pm, Room 8). Also on Friday, Comic-Con International hosts guest Berkeley Breathed for a spotlight panel (1-2 pm, Room 6A).

On Saturday, learn about what IDW has in store for 2011 from Chris Ryall, Scott Dunbier, Brian Lynch and a special guest (12 noon-1 pm, Room 8); hear Alex Irvine, Jonathan Maberry, Mario Acevedo, Nancy Collins, [Bloom County Volume One cover]Peter David and Steve Niles discuss working in comics (2:30-3:30 pm, Room 5AB); and learn about how experience as military service members influences the comics work of Acevedo, Larry Hama, Billy Tucci, and Tom Waltz (5-6 pm, Room 5AB).

On Sunday, round out the convention experience with a panel about the future of digital comics, moderated by Macworld Senior Editor Jason Snell, with IDW’s Director of ePublishing, Jeff Webber, Jeff Smith, iVerse’s Michael Murphy, Sony’s Adriana Eyzaguirre, and creators J. Scott Campbell and Jeff Smith.

For a complete listing of IDW Publishing’s San Diego Comic Con events and exclusives, please visit IDWPublishing.com/SDCC.

Visit IDWPublishing.com to learn more about the company and its top-selling books.

About IDW Publishing
IDW is an award-winning publisher of comic books, graphic novels and trade paperbacks, based in San Diego, California. Renowned for its diverse catalog of licensed and independent titles, IDW publishes some of the most successful and popular titles in the industry, including: Hasbro’s The Transformers and G.I. JOE, Paramount’s Star Trek; Fox’s Angel; the BBC’s Doctor Who; and comics and trade collections based on novels by worldwide bestselling author, James Patterson. IDW is also home to the Library of American Comics imprint, which publishes classic comic reprints; Yoe! Books, a partnership with Yoe! Studios; and is the print publisher for EA Comics and ComicMix.

IDW’s original horror series, 30 Days of Night, was launched as a major motion picture in October 2007 by Sony Pictures and was the #1 film in its first week of release. More information about the company can be found at IDWPublishing.com.

IDW Launches Literary Mash-Ups with Limited Joe R. Lansdale Novella

Official Press Release

IDW Launches Literary Mash-Ups with
Limited Joe R. Lansdale Novella

Full Classics Mutilated collection coming in October

[Dread Island cover]

San Diego, CA (July 15, 2010) – IDW Publishing is proud to announce CLASSICS MUTILATED, an all-new prose collection of genre mash-up stories by top-tier authors, coming in October. At San Diego Comic-Con, IDW will debut the original novella “Dread Island” by noted horror and crime writer Joe R. Lansdale, as an exclusive preview of the upcoming collection. Lansdale will be featured at special autograph sessions at the IDW booth #2643 throughout the convention.

CLASSICS MUTILATED offers a different take on the current monster-lit trend by challenging a coterie of major talents to twist fantasy and horror elements with classic tales and icons, creating all-new stories. Lansdale’s “Dread Island” showcases the collection’s unique tone by featuring Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer in a new adventure, with bizarre fantasy and supernatural elements out of both H. P. Lovecraft and Uncle Remus.

“I wrote ‘Dread Island’ based on my love for Mark Twain,” reveals Lansdale, “which collided with my interest in Lovecraft, and the fact that the Uncle Remus tales may have been the first stories I ever read. And then there were comics. I always saw ‘Dread Island’ as a kind of comic book in prose, the old Classics Illustrated look. That’s how it played out in my head.”

Available in October, the full CLASSICS MUTILATED collection will feature fifteen stories from writers such as Nancy Collins, John Shirley, Thomas Tessier, Kristine Katheryn Rusch, Chris Ryall, Rick Hautala, John Skipp and Cody Goodfellow. The collection will also feature a painted, wrap around cover by Menton Matthews III.

To promote the upcoming CLASSICS MUTILATED, “Dread Island” will be available in four different editions, beginning with the trade paperback version, limited to 500 copies and available only at conventions. After SDCC, IDW will offer a 400-copy signed hardcover edition and a 100-copy signed and numbered leatherbound edition exclusively through the company’s website. A fourth, “retailer only” configuration will be available to Diamond accounts for an October release, alongside CLASSICS MUTILATED.

“CLASSICS MUTILATED is our take on this so-called Monster- Lit trend,” explains Jeff Conner, the collection’s editor. “Rather than foisting zombies and the like onto beloved literary classics or unsuspecting historic figures, we’re approaching the concept from the other end, challenging an unholy cabal of fantasy and horror writers to use their dark arts on genre-blending. The results have been remarkable, as lucky readers of Lansdale’s ‘Dread Island’ preview edition will get to see.”

Dread Island ($15, 86 pages, trade paperback, prose) will be available from IDW at San Diego Comic Con.

Dread Island ($35, 86 pages, hardcover, signed, prose) will be available from IDW Publishing in August.

Dread Island ($100, 86 pages, hardcover, signed and numbered, prose) will be available from IDW Publishing in August.

Dread Island ($24.99, 86 pages, hardcover, signed, prose) will be available in stores in October.

Classics Mutilated ($16.99, 320 pages, paperback, prose) will be available in stores in October. ISBN 978-160010830-3

Visit IDWPublishing.com to learn more about the company and its top-selling books.

About IDW Publishing
IDW is an award-winning publisher of comic books, graphic novels and trade paperbacks, based in San Diego, California. Renowned for its diverse catalog of licensed and independent titles, IDW publishes some of the most successful and popular titles in the industry, including: Hasbro’s The Transformers and G.I. JOE, Paramount’s Star Trek; Fox’s Angel; the BBC’s Doctor Who; and comics and trade collections based on novels by worldwide bestselling author, James Patterson. IDW is also home to the Library of American Comics imprint, which publishes classic comic reprints; Yoe! Books, a partnership with Yoe! Studios; and is the print publisher for EA Comics and ComicMix.

IDW’s original horror series, 30 Days of Night, was launched as a major motion picture in October 2007 by Sony Pictures and was the #1 film in its first week of release. More information about the company can be found at IDWPublishing.com.