Tag Archives: michael wiggam

RPM, Sherwood Texas, Black Birch, and McBain are Coming Soon to Macroverse.

Macroverse is a digital comics platform app designed to read comics on mobile devices. Comics are formated using “Tapstory” which creates an experience built for that reading experience.

With a flurry of new additions to the platform, there’s even more coming soon and debuting in the coming months. Check out what you can be reading soon.

RPM

(W) Mick Foley, Shane Riches (A) Jose Holder (C) Michael Wiggam
Coming Soon

Revere Windsor, a direct descendant of the legendary Paul Revere, is hired by a mysterious corporation to safely move a priceless package from Boston to Miami. Born with hyper-kinetic depth perception, Revere sees and reacts to the world faster than anyone, making him the best at what he does. Partnered with the corporation’s beautiful liaison, Revere pushes head-on against international criminals and shadowy government agencies.

From the mind of Mick Foley, multiple New York Times #1 bestselling author and 4-time World Heavyweight Champion, this high-octane midnight ride is a fuel-injected package of unflinching speed and unrelenting action.

TapStory and Letters by Steven Perkins and Macroverse Creative. Edited by Keven Gardner.

RPM

Sherwood Texas

(W) Shane Berryhill (A) Daniel Hillyard (C) Charlie Kirchoff
November 19

Re-imagining the legend of Robin Hood as a modern day Spaghetti Western, Sherwood, TX, is set inside the world of biker gangs, drug wars, and human trafficking.

After the same biker gang who murdered his father leaves ROB HOOD for dead, he returns seeking his own brand of justice and revenge. Hood is joined on his quest by Padre Elvin Tuck, Will Scarlet, and Little John, as they take on the crooked Sheriff of Nottingham, Texas and his partners in crime, The Nobles biker gang and their leader John Prince.

Key Art by Andrew Robinson. Edited by Keven Gardner. TapStory and Letters by Steven Perkins and Macroverse Creative.

Sherwood Texas

Black Birch

(W) Eduardo Cintron (A) Juan Doe
December 2020

For generations, the families in the small town of Black Birch have bred children for economic gain. The community thrives until rules are broken and traditions come undone. A bloody sequence of events ensue, giving Hazel Hooke the opportunity to determine their future. After all, it’s a family business.

TapStory and Letters by Adam Martin, Eben Matthews, and Macroverse Creative.

Black Birch

McBain

(W) David Tischman (A) Kody Chamberlain, Brian Stelfreeze
Coming Soon

Country music superstar Trace Adkins is LUKE MCBAIN, a man who returns to his small Southern hometown after 14 years in prison for a crime he did not commit. Luke’s brother, Paul, is running the McBain family business that controls the town. Paul’s made himself rich, but local shops have closed and jobs are gone; people are angry and scared.  And no one can do anything to stop it.  Except Luke, the only one who knows Paul’s secret.  Reunited with his beautiful ex-love, Callie, Luke McBain does what he’s always done–make the hard choices and fight for what’s right.  Even if it means he may go back to prison.  Starring an action hero who won’t stop until the job gets done, Luke McBain pits brother against brother for the soul of an American small town.

Trace Adkins has sold over 10 million albums.  He competed on Celebrity Apprentice.  You’ve seen him in The Lincoln Lawyer.  Now Trace Adkins is Luke McBain– an American hero for our times, in a story of right and wrong in the tradition of Billy Jack and Walking Tall.

TapStory and Letters by Steven Perkins and Macroverse Creative. Edited by Keven Gardner.

McBain

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview – ICE #4

ICE #4 (of 4)

Writer: Doug Wagner
Artist: Jose Holder
Co-Feature Artist: Brian Stelfreeze
Cover: Brian Stelfreeze
Colors: Michael Wiggam
$3.99

The battle for simple justice has turned deeply personal for ICE agent Cole Matai, who has left his badge in the states and illegally crossed the border into Mexico, seeking only revenge after the shocking events of the last issue.

With his goal being to finish off Luis Morales once and for all, Cole takes the battle straight to the most ruthless criminal he’s ever encountered.  Two men, two knives, and a battle for the ages.  It has all led to this….ICE #4 will not disappoint!

Teaser – ICE #3

ICE #3 (of 4)

Writer: Doug Wagner
Artist: Jose Holder
Co-Feature Artist: Brian Stelfreeze
Cover: Brian Stelfreeze
Colors: Michael Wiggam
$3.99

Following issue #2’s stunning conclusion, the worm has turned and the ICE team is under attack! Luis Morales and his cartel are now on the offensive—taking the battle directly to Cole Matai and his elite tactical team while they are off-duty and alone.  Unfortunately, this bold move by Morales will cost an ICE agent his life, causing Cole to take justice into his own hands—or die trying.

Teaser – ICE #2

Official Press Release

ICE #2 (of 4)

Writer: Doug Wagner
Artist: Jose Holder
Co-Feature Artist: Brian Stelfreeze
Cover: Brian Stelfreeze
Colors: Michael Wiggam
$3.99

Following a string of brutal drug-runner murders in the States, the U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement agency’s top tactical team is in hot pursuit of the killer.  As they close in on the suspect (drug-kingpin Luis Morales), chaos erupts on the streets in a jumble of bullets and explosions!  As the battle rages, Morales attempts to escape and ICE agent Cole Matai is forced to leave his team and pursue the ruthless killer on foot.  Cole corners Morales and gets the upper hand— but makes a critical decision that will end up haunting him forever.

12-Gauge Comics is known for high-octane action, and ICE is taking that reputation to a new level!  Don’t miss the next installment of this summer’s hottest new series!

ICE #2 Cover

ICE #1 Teaser

Official Press Release

ICE #1 (of 4)

Writer: Doug Wagner
Artist: Jose Holder
Co-Feature Artist: Brian Stelfreeze
Cover Artist: Brian Stelfreeze
Colors: Michael Wiggam 

$1.00 BUCKSHOT EDITION (special introductory price)

ICE #1 – Blasting into comic stores for only $1.00! 

The U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement agency (a.k.a. ICE) is charged with keeping our borders secure.  The politics are complicated, but they don’t matter to COLE MATAI, leader of the best tactical group ICE has to offer.  For him, it’s all about protecting the public from men like LUIS MORALES, head of a ruthless Mexican drug cartel.  When Morales notices that some of his drug runners are stealing inventory, he takes it personal.  Shockwaves hit three U.S. cities as members of his cartel are savagely murdered over a period of weeks, all at the hands of Morales. The cross-country manhunt for this vicious killer begins here—don’t miss it!

ICE #1 Cover