Tag Archives: michael benedetto

Search for Hu banner ad

Preview: Drive #4 (of 4)

Drive #4 (of 4)

Michael Benedetto (w) • Antonio Fuso (a & c)

Endings. They come unannounced. Could be an alley. Or a parking lot. But here, with a quarter million dollars of someone else’s money, the road leads two ways—to Phoenix, or a dead end.

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Drive_04_cvr

Preview: Drive #3 (of 4)

Drive #3 (of 4)

Michael Benedetto (w) • Antonio Fuso (a & c)

It was a set up—had to be. And when the dead men at the hotel don’t make it home, those who sent them will ask questions. Then they’ll send someone else. They always do.

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Drive_03_cvr

Preview: Drive #2 (of 4)

Drive #2 (of 4)

Michael Benedetto (w) • Antonio Fuso (a & c)

Consequences—they’re tough to outrun. Even when you play it right and travel light and the Hollywood hills are just a few turns away. Truth is it’s simple: in L.A. a quarter million dollars doesn’t go missing for long.

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Drive_02-pr_page7_image1

Review: Drive #1 (of 4)

drive_01-lo-993x1528In L.A., there’s one man you want behind the wheel. Just tell him where and when. He doesn’t take part, doesn’t know anyone, doesn’t carry a weapon. He drives, and he’s the best.

Published by IDW, Drive is a four part adaptation of James Sallis‘ 2005 novel, also entitled Drive. If the name sounds familiar, there was a movie adaptation of the same name produced in 2011 starring Ryan Gosling. Critically, the movie was very successful, earning several award nominations, and the book is regarded quite highly, too.  I haven’t  seen the movie, yet, nor read the book, and so the comic book adaptation is my first exposure to the so far nameless driver.

My knowledge of the book and movie are limited pretty much to what you’ve already read, so that being said, while I can’t compare this to the source material, or the movie, as a comic book I really enjoyed it. The driver, who isn’t named (and probably won’t be), is a character that is at once very intriguing, and yet almost totally unreadable. Micheal Benedetto doesn’t give much away about the driver, perhaps because the driver is so shrouded in anonymity that to explore the inner workings of his psyche in the first issue would be a detriment to the character and the story.

Unlike, however the art team on this issue.

Penciler Antonio Fuso, inker Emilio Lecce and colourist Jason Lewis give us so terrifically moody art work, perfectly capturing the apathetic attitude of the driver towards almost every thing with dull, muted colours and some slowly paced art work. However when the comic calls for some more exlosive action on behalf of the driver the layouts and the paneling really tell the unspoken tale that he thinks life is just the moments in between the times he sits behind the wheel.

As a heist story the comic book version of Drive is shaping up to be really good, which probably comes as no surprise to those familiar with James Sallis‘ novel or the movie led by Ryan Gosling, but for those of us who aren’t familiar with the source material, that’s very good news. I always have some trepidation when opening a licensed comic, but in this case there was no need what so ever.

Drive #1  is a good comic book; perhaps it’s not as good a comic as the driver is a driver, but it’s still very much worth reading. If I’m completely honest with you, I expected this to be pretty average comic book, but it wasn’t.

This four part miniseries is something that you’re going to want to jump right in and enjoy the ride. Pun intended.

Story: Michaell Benedetto Art: Antonio Fuso, Emilio Lecce, Jason Lewis
Story: 8.25 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Drive #1 (of 4)

Drive #1 (of 4)

Michael Benedetto (w) • Antonio Fuso (a & c)

A hard-boiled pop-culture sensation re-created for comics.

In L.A., there’s one man you want behind the wheel. Just tell him where and when. He doesn’t take part, doesn’t know anyone, doesn’t carry a weapon. He drives, and he’s the best.

Ride along as James Sallis’ lean nü-noir masterpiece unfolds onto the sun-bleached streets of Los Angeles in this exciting 4-part comic book adaptation.

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

drive_01-lo-993x1528

James Sallis’ Drive Comes to IDW

DriveIDW Publishing hits the sun-bleached streets of L.A. this summer with the comic-book adaption of James Sallis’ modern noir classic, Drive. Artist Antonio Fuso alongside IDW’s own Michael Benedetto will adapt Sallis’ novel into a four-part series of Hollywood stunt driving, high-stakes heists, and cold-blooded revenge.

Drive follows a young man who escapes to L.A. to do one thing, drive. That’s all he does, and he’s the best. Whether on studio lots as a stunt driver or in high-speed chases evading the cops, there’s no one better behind the wheel. That kind of expertise comes with a hefty price tag and allows for a strict set of principles: “I don’t sit in while you’re planning the score or while you’re running it down… I don’t take part, I don’t know anyone, I drive…” But in L.A.’s criminal underworld, the rules are made to be broken if you want to stay alive.

First published in 2005, Drive is a critically acclaimed novel praised by The New York Times as “a perfect piece of noir fiction.” The 2011 award-winning film adaptation featured an all-star cast and was lauded for its hyper-stylized vision of Los Angeles. IDW Publishing’s comic book adaptation celebrates the 10-year anniversary of the novel’s release.

Almost American