Tag Archives: micah myers

Grit is Coming in July from Scout Comics

Old Man Barrow, known best for his sour attitude and his ruthless efficiency. He bites off more than he can chew when a routine troll-hunting gig goes awry, landing him in the clutches of a backwoods doomsday cult. Ignorant to the true nature of the malign forces at work, Barrow is forced to team up with Ari, a hot-headed young witch dead set on breaking him of his ultra-violent habits. Swamp hags and goblin gangs be damned, it’ll be a miracle if these unlikely allies can make it through this mess without killing each other!

Grit is a brand-new comic series coming out July 2020 from writer Brian Wickman, art by Kevin Castaniero, color by Simon Gough, and lettering by Micah Myers. Scout Comics will publish it.

Grit

Review: Youth #1

Youth #1

Youth #1 is a new take on both the coming of age and superhero genres from Curt Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cunniffe. It’s about two teenagers, River and Frank, who are kind of, sort of boyfriends, that are fed up with their lives so they steal River’s step dad’s mustang and go on the run. The comic has plenty of attitude, a little bit pretentiousness, and goes full throttle from the first page where Pires and Diotto cross cut between River being berated by his step dad and Frank being berated by his manager and a random customer at the fast food restaurant he works at. (Seriously, everyone seems to be an asshole in this universe.)

My favorite part of Youth #1 is Pires and Diotto’s creative use of grid layouts to introduce characters, ramp up conflict, and pull off one hell of a car chase. They immediately create parallels between River and Frank and establish a relationship between them based on shared trauma even though they don’t appear on panel together eight pages in. Basically, the world treats them like shit so they lash out through one great two panel page punch before slowing down to a more romantic nine panel grid with soft colors from Cunniffe.

After the blows are landed, Curt Pires immediately backpedals and uses a Mike Tyson quote to establish our protagonists as both unreliable narrators and the opposite of role models. With some Pires comics in the past, he seems to over-rely on purple prose narration, but he’s pared down this a lot or undercut it with self-deprecating humor. I enjoy that he and Diotto portray Frank and River as a couple of messed up kids, who fall in with other messed up kids later in the comic crafting a drama filled ensemble cast. Think the attractive cast of a reality television show, but with more overt drug use, assault of police officers, and in a breath of fresh air, queerness.

Heteronormativity is a big no-no in Youth #1 with River and Frank treating their homophobic classmate with a shrug as they skip town in a Mustang, or Frank telling a girl he makes out with at a party that he doesn’t like to label his sexuality. Your average, middle aged boring writer at the Big Two would make the high school bully some great foe for them, but he’s just an annoyance on their way to other adventures like blowing up cars, reenacting Grand Theft Auto, and this issue’s explosive ending.

Rebellion seems to be the central theme of Youth #1 with Frank and River truly having some to rage against as evidenced in the opening scene. However, it seems like some of their peers are rebelling just to rebel like the host of the party, who is the son of a senator, and parties in his huge house while his dad is doing consulting work in Dubai. The line of dialogue and corresponding image from Diotto is sharp satire at the children of well-off people, who choose to act out and rebel, but honestly, it makes sense that the cast of Youth are rough around the edges and can’t articulate their actions into a neat thesis.

Beat up a cop, go on the run, and fuck the consequences because life is short, right. However, the tail end of Youth #1 does introduce some consequences that will shape the narrative of this miniseries as Pires and Diotto introduce change into their story ecosystem like a splash page after a neat grid or car chase scene where you can see every maneuver.

Tone-wise, with its musical influence, teens on the run motif, and lackadaisical approach to superpowers, Youth #1 is We Can Never Go Home meets Chronicle, which is interesting because Pires has a written a few comics for Black Mask Studios. With their messy motivations, lust for life, and distrust of authority, I definitely gravitated to the teens of Youth even though they come across as little assholes at times. But weren’t we all at that age?

Story: Curt Pires Art: Alex Diotto 
Colors: Dee Cunniffe Letters: Micah Myers
Story: 7.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Comixology Originals provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Olympia #1

Olympia #1

Olympia #1 kicks off a love letter to comics. The debut issue revolves around Elon, a latchkey kid who spends his days alone reading comic books. One day his favorite superhero, Olympian, comes crashing into reality. The concept is something we’ve seen before but there’s a heartfelt aspect to this debut that oozes off of the page.

Created by Tony Pires and Curt Pires, Olympia was created by them as Tony was undergoing treatment for cancer. There’s an earnest meditation on hope and loss in the first issue as we get hints of Elon’s life. The comic also oozes wonder as Elon meets his hero. There’s something for every comic fan to relate to in this debut which makes it all the more impressive. Whether it’s Elon’s personal life or his isolation reading comics, it’s something we’ve experienced.

While the concept, so far, doesn’t feel original, there’s just an enthusiasm that works in the comic. It’s relatable and emotional set up that sucks readers in. It’s also clearly a love letter to comics. From the magical story itself to the art.

The art by Alex Diotto riffs on the classic work of Jack Kirby who’s quoted within the comic. From the colors by Dee Cunniffe to the lettering of Micah Myers there’s a feel of “retro” in so much of the comic. A use of a Kirby crackle to the style of the colors and type of coloring, there’s been a lot of thought to create a look that evokes the classic comics the story loves.

Olympia #1 is the fantastical experience of a reader being drawn into the world they’re engaging in. There’s a meta aspect to the comic as we the reader are sucked into the experience ourselves. It’s a comic you can enjoy for the story and connect on an emotional and personal level. It’s an experience and story we can all relate to in some way.

Story: Tony Pires, Curt Pires Art: Alex Diotto
Color: Dee Cunniffe Letterer: Micah Myers Design: Ryan Ferrier
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Monarchs #1

Monarchs #1

Welcome to the planet Vida, an euphoric haven of resources. The sentient race inhabiting Vida depend of the strict leadership of their rulers for guidance. Four young geniuses are tasked with discovering and instituting an ideal method of leadership to make this the utopian society that the inhabitants wish to create. A simple experiment becomes an epic story of war, discovery, good old-fashioned bragging rights and the answers to the question of what makes a leader? Do we need leaders? And if we didn’t, what would happen to a world without them?

I first got to read Monarchs months ago and rereading it again now that it’s released, it’s still as good as I remember. The concept is a fun one with a mix of philosophy and video games to create a comic that I can’t think of having read before. Monarchs #1 is unique and stands above a lot of comics due to that.

The concept is unique. Four individuals are sent to a planet to test what an ideal society is like. Writer A.C. Medina, who co-created the series with artist Fernando Pinto, has put together a first issue that feels like a video game in many aspects. It feels like four games setting up for an online battle, building their base and getting supplies to keep their forces running and of course the eventual clash between them. You can see the influences of Starcraft and World of Warcraft and so many RTS’ before them. It also shows you can easily do a comic about esports interesting enough. But Medina adds more than that giving each character their own personality, with stats, that also delivers a bit of roleplaying to it all.

Pinto’s art, joined by Triona Farrell and letterer Micah Myers, helps things with each character and their society being unique in both look but also colors. Much like those video games, we get a who’s who by what color they are. The video game aspect of it all comes through in a great way. Add in an art style that mixes the sci-fi aspects with cartoony details and it feels like something Blizzard might put together.

The comic is a fun one with a style and concept all to its own. I want to see where it all goes and how much of this idea of building a society is explored. Mixed together with the style that takes so much from video games, it’s a comic that stands out with a “voice” that’s unique and entertaining. Definitely one to check out for so many reasons.

Story: A.C. Medina Art: Fernando Pinto
Color: Triona Farrell Letterer: Micah Myers
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Scout Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Monarchs #1

Welcome to the planet Vida, an euphoric haven of resources. The sentient race inhabiting Vida depend of the strict leadership of their rulers for guidance. Four young geniuses are tasked with discovering and instituting an ideal method of leadership to make this the utopian society that the inhabitants wish to create. A simple experiment becomes an epic story of war, discovery, good old-fashioned bragging rights and the answers to the question of what makes a leader? Do we need leaders? And if we didn’t, what would happen to a world without them?

I first got to read Monarchs months ago and rereading it again now that it’s released, it’s still as good as I remember. The concept is a fun one with a mix of philosophy and video games to create a comic that I can’t think of having read before. Monarchs #1 is unique and stands above a lot of comics due to that.

The concept is unique. Four individuals are sent to a planet to test what an ideal society is like. Writer A.C. Medina, who co-created the series with artist Fernando Pinto, has put together a first issue that feels like a video game in many aspects. It feels like four games setting up for an online battle, building their base and getting supplies to keep their forces running and of course the eventual clash between them. You can see the influences of Starcraft and World of Warcraft and so many RTS’ before them. It also shows you can easily do a comic about esports interesting enough. But Medina adds more than that giving each character their own personality, with stats, that also delivers a bit of roleplaying to it all.

Pinto’s art, joined by Triona Farrell and letterer Micah Myers, helps things with each character and their society being unique in both look but also colors. Much like those video games, we get a who’s who by what color they are. The video game aspect of it all comes through in a great way. Add in an art style that mixes the sci-fi aspects with cartoony details and it feels like something Blizzard might put together.

The comic is a fun one with a style and concept all to its own. I want to see where it all goes and how much of this idea of building a society is explored. Mixed together with the style that takes so much from video games, it’s a comic that stands out with a “voice” that’s unique and entertaining. Definitely one to check out for so many reasons.

Story: A.C. Medina Art: Fernando Pinto
Color: Triona Farrell Letterer: Micah Myers
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Scout Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Exclusive Preview: Masked Republic Luchaverse: Tinieblas Jr #1 One-Shot

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Tinieblas Jr #1 One-Shot

Story & Script: Marco Lopez, Ivan Plaza
Art: Diego Simone
Letterer: Micah Myers
Cover: Diego Simone
Variant Cover: Sergio Ríos, Dan Olvera
Executive Producers: Kevin Kleinrock, Ruben Zamora
Editor: Ivan Plaza
October 15, 2018

Tinieblas Jr is the proud inheritor of a legacy that dates to the early 1970’s, when his father Tinieblas started his lucha libre career. However, unknown to anyone but a small select few, Tinieblas Jr is also the protector of both human and monster realms. A monster hunter, taking on the legions of the damned and all manner of creatures that go bump in the night! Today, out of his secret lair with his assistant Ramona, they decide to help a close friend solve an ages old mystery. A mystery so old, it will change both the human and monster worlds forever!

Comics Review: Rey Mysterio #1

San Diego Comic-Con 2018 saw the launch of the Luchaverse with Rey Mysterio #1. Published by Chido Comics and Masked Republic, the Luchaverse brings together such greats like Rey Mysterio, Blue Demon Jr, Konan, Los Cadetes del Espacio, and the Lucha Brothers in a shared comic universe.

Rey Mysterio #1 is a one-shot kicking off the universe as a dormant and mysterious power has been released.

The comic story and script is by Marco Lopez and Ivan Plaza with pencils and inks by Ben Harvey, colors by Bryan Magnaye, cover by Ben Harvey, and lettering by Micah Myers.

You can order your copy now!

Preview: Jirni Vol. 3 #5

JIRNI VOL 3 #5

J.T. Krul – Story / Michael Santamaria – Art / John Starr – Colors / Micah Myers – Letters

Aspen’s popular fantasy adventure series, JIRNI, reaches the final issue of its epic third volume!

Ara has once again come face-to-face with the evil sorcerer Torinthal as she tries to free her mother. But, she never imagined where her search would lead her and what life-changing results might befall her. If she’s survives. Don’t miss the climatic finale to the biggest Jirni story yet. The Fall of the D’jinn!

Created by New York Times Best-Selling author J.T. Krul (Michael Turner’s Soulfire, Green Arrow) with art by Michael Santamaria and Mauricio Campetella, colorist John Starr, and letters by Micah Myers this next exciting chapter of Jirni will once again return readers to a land of untapped wonder!

JIRNI VOL 3 #5 is in stores July 11th, 2018!

FC 32 pages $3.99

Borinquen: An Anthology for Puerto Rico Kickstarting Now

In mid-September 2017, the island of Puerto Rico was ravaged by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. A new Kickstarter hopes to raise money for a comic anthology that will raise money to help benefit the victims of the devastation.

Borinquen: An Anthology for Puerto Rico is an anthology about Puerto Rico, its people, its history, and the perseverance shown in the face of such destruction. The goal of this anthology is to raise funds to help the people of Puerto Rico. Net proceeds will be donated to United for Puerto Rico.

Borinquen features 12 short stories by some of the best creators in the business, as well as names you’ve not heard of…yet. Our proud team includes:

  • Roel Torres (Deathface Rocket Crew; Lightning Girl Loves Rocket Boy)
  • Helen Greetham (Jabbage Comics)
  • Jack Holder (Arcane Industries)
  • Beth Barnett (Brewed Awakening)
  • Micah Myers (Rat Queens Special; Bastard’s Waltz; Kill All Monsters)
  • Jonny Bloozit (The Nowhere Man)
  • Rafael Nieves (Bloodlines; Hellstorm; Bob Howard: Plumber of the Unknown)
  • Tony Maldonado (Bandthology; P.I. Jane)
  • Dino Caruso (Blue Hour; Dark Lies, Darker Truths)
  • Shawn Richison (Fisk: The Substitute)
  • Joe Covas (Ko the Bold)
  • Lawrence Plofker (lplofker.wordpress.com)
  • Zack Rupp (Detropia)
  • Emmanuel Reyes
  • Nadia Mujalli
  • Paul Axel (Rotten Roots)
  • Robin Gee (Pin Porter: Girl Detective)
  • Phillip Kennedy Johnson (Warlords of Appalachia; Smoketown)
  • Steve Beach (The Witching Hour; The Lost Boys of the U-Boat Bremen)
  • Mina Elwell (InferNoct)
  • T.E. Lawrence
  • Andrea Mutti (Rebels; Control)
  • Paul Mounts (Painkiller Jane; Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man)

Creators have donated their time and skills for this project and money raised will go towards printing and ISBN. All profit goes to charity.

The project hopes to raise $2,200 and ends December 26, 2017.

Review: Comichaus #2

The first time I remember hearing about Heavy Metal magazine, was when one of my friends just finished watching the movie, and was hoping it would be the same as the movie. I was curious as well, so I went watched the movie and had my mind blown, even though the stories seemed hokey, it was still quite interesting. So, when I picked up my first copy of the magazine, I was little disappointed at first, but that is until I got into the stories. Each story had its own flavor and tapped into a piece of the human psyche that comics had not done until then.

Needless to say, the bar had been raised then and every anthology magazine, even if they don’t say, have attempted to emulate the magic, that Heavy Metal did in those days. Comichaus, is one magazine, that understands how that magic, and doe sit well, as evidenced in this second issue of their ongoing series, In the first story, we catch up with “Karyn Shade”, as in the last issue she was going to that scary house, where she takes out the cult’s leader’s soldiers and is just in time for dinner. In the second installment of “Feather”, Bernie’s sickness has gotten worse, as the widespread news of how the epidemic takes over people’s bodies has streamed into public consciousness, just when he can no longer hide it.

In the second part of “Suited and Booted”, Moses get whim of a suit which can change the game not only for him but all at stake. In this next installment of “The Troubleshooters”, we catch up with our cantankerous duo, as they find out this town, has more surprises than they first thought, as they soon realize a war is coming. In the continuation of “Mortality”, our hero gets to a guided tour of the Underworld, as he still is search of his daughter. In this second installment of “Keyhole”, things fall apart for this family, and our narrator must now deal with a new family, and nothing will ever be the same again.

Overall, a great second installment to all ongoing stories contained within, as each creator does no miss a beat. Each story has only gotten better with this installment. The art is still amazing. Altogether, a great second issue, that I can only see exceeding expectations from the last issue.

Story: James McCulloch, Dave Cook, Jon Laight, Aaron Walther, Luke Cooper, Chris Welsh
Art: Jessica Byrne, Norrie Millar, Dan Butcher, Grant Richards, Ed Bickford, Luke Cooper, Micah Myers, David Pavol
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation:Buy

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