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Your First Look at Saladin Ahmed & Sami Kivelä’s Abbott: 1973 #5

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Abbott: 1973 #5, the final issue of the series from Miles Morales: Spider-Man mastermind & Eisner Award-winning writer Saladin Ahmed and acclaimed artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. This new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it, available on May 26, 2021.

This is it – Elena vs. The Umbra, with the future of Detroit on the line. But even if Elena can save those closest to her, nothing will ever be the same…

Abbott: 1973 #5 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Tula Lotay.

ABBOTT: 1973 #5

Get a Look at Abbott: 1973 #4 from Saladin Ahmed, Sami Kivelä, Mattia Iacono, and Jim Campbell

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Abbott: 1973 #4, the latest issue of the new series from writer Saladin Ahmed and artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. This new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it, available on April 28, 2021.

Elena has assembled a force of unlikely allies to mount an important rescue mission – but with vengeful gangsters and the deadly Umbra closing in, this is a fight they may not be able to win. The secret to victory may lie with one of Elena’s old friends – and the dark truth behind the Umbra’s return.

Abbott: 1973 #4 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Jen Bartel.

Review: Carnage, Black, White, and Blood #1

Carnage: Black, White, and Blood #1

There’s been a string of anthology releases with a “color” theme about them. Black, white, and red has been a popular combo. Then there’s also blue and red. There’s the “blood” direction that Marvel has gone as in “black, white, and blood”. Carnage: Black, White, and Blood #1 is the latest anthology that focuses on the ruthless killer.

With a trio of stories the anthology is an interesting one delivering three very different adventures. The first is a very tradition superhero affair with Carnage drifting off to another life. The second takes place in the Wild West with a lawman on the hunt for Carnage. The final is a brilliant choose your own adventure story.

Each has their strengths and weaknesses and each are intriguing takes on the character. There’s still some underlying themes with each, specifically how much of a force of nature the character is and how uncontrollable Carnage is as a symbiote. There’s some stumbles in a few of the stories but it’s an entertaining read, especially the roleplaying like choose your ow adventure, an entry I’d love to see more of.

The art delivers on the chaos as well with visuals that match the death and destruction within the comic. There’s some solid work, especially with the western, that really fits the stories they’re telling and the use of minimal colors makes things interesting. With such a focus on “blood”, it’d be easy for the comic to overdo the red but it’s done at a level that doesn’t distract.

Carnage: Black, White, and Blood #1 is an interesting comic. If you’re a fan of the character, go for it. It’s entertaining and has some interesting takes. For those new, there’s not enough that really jumps out. It’s good one-and-done stories that has some “fun” with a despicable character.

Story: Tini Howard, Benjamin Percy, Al Ewing Art: Ken Lashley, Sara Pichelli, John McCrea
Color: Juan Fernandez, Mattia Iacono Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Get a Look at Saladin Ahmed & Sami Kivelä’s Abbott: 1973 #3 from BOOM!

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Abbott: 1973 #3, the latest issue of the new series from Miles Morales: Spider-Man mastermind and Eisner Award-winning writer Saladin Ahmed and acclaimed artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. This new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it, available in March 2021.

The dark forces terrorizing Detroit have struck Elena Abbott where it hurts most…and she’s going to strike back. But even after pulling together an uneasy alliance with the last people she expected, Abbott is about to learn her enemies are one step ahead of her… and it might cost her the person she loves most.

Abbott: 1973 #3 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Dani with colors by Tamra Bonvillain. It will be available for sale on March 17, 2021.

ABBOTT: 1973 #3

Get a First Look at Saladin Ahmed and Kivelä’s Abbott: 1973 #2

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at Abbott: 1973 #2, the latest issue of the new series from Miles Morales: Spider-Man mastermind and Eisner Award-winning writer Saladin Ahmed and acclaimed artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. This new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it.

An old friend sends an ominous warning to Abbott – her enemies have returned to weaken her by any means necessary. As the personal losses mount and her efforts at the newspaper are blocked, Abbott finally catches a break – uncovering one of the most guarded secrets of the group aiming to take down the man who would be Detroit’s first Black mayor. But all victories come with a cost…and this one may just be too high for Abbott to pay!

Abbott: 1973 #2 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Mirka Andolfo, will be available for sale on February 17, 2021.

Abbott: 1973 #2

Review: Abbott 1973 #1

The minute I finished the first Abbott book by Saladin Ahmed and Sami Kivelä it became my go-to recommendation for people looking to get into comics. It still holds that position. A lot of it is due to how much like a contemporary comic it feels like, as if you were reading something that couldn’t have come out any other time, despite it being set in 1970’s Detroit while also borrowing ideas from the political thrillers and horror movies of that decade.

To say I was anxiously awaiting the first issue of its second arc is an understatement of the highest order. Following the investigations of journalist Elena Abbott—“a  detective for the people,” as the comic proclaims—feels like taking a journey through the underbelly of America’s unique version of systemic racism, a brutal trek through it with the intention of deconstructing all of it with dark magic thrown into the mix to further power the metaphors at play in the story.

Abbott 1973

The second arc seems to be operating on the same wavelength, with Abbott facing yet another supernatural threat fueled by racial animosity, only this time the powers of corruption are looking to dismantle the candidacy of a Detroit mayoral candidate poised to become the city’s first black person to take up the position.

Set in 1973, Ahmed and Kivelä keep the titular journalist from straying from her old-school investigative methods, echoing movies like All the President’s Men in terms of how it develops a sense of danger that bubbles up with each attempt at shedding light on the potential sabotage of the black mayoral candidate. Each new sliver of information dug up through her investigation raises the stakes not just for the story she’s working on but for her very own sense of safety.

Ahmed and Kivelä achieve this in the first book, which focuses on elected officials dabbling in dark magic to keep black communities in a constant state of chaos and instability, a tactic that allowed the ruling class to justify anti-black measures in the name of public safety (not to mention precious votes).

In Abbott 1973, the protagonist is now well aware of the dark influences that are trying to disrupt Detroit’s political structure while also being conscious of the fact magic and journalism have a complicated history with the public standard of veracity and reliability.

Abbott 1973

While these ideas are difficult to separate from the character and her story, Ahmed and Kivelä manage to complicate Abbott’s daily grind even more with an added focus on social notions of femininity in the public arena and in the professional workspace.

The comic dives into these obstacles through a new black character that comes into Abbott’s newspaper organization as its latest publisher, a man called Mr. Manning. This new figure of authority insists on keeping up appearances concocted by male-dominated notions of etiquette and behavior, instructing Abbott on how women should dress and behave in the workplace.

Given the story’s focus on change, and how the election of Detroit’s first black mayor stands as a plea for it, Abbott 1973 #1 looks to the country’s past to reflect on the current state of politics, be it racial or otherwise. Just how deep the comic will go to comment on this remains to be seen, but it’s well on its way to add something to the conversation (especially in the context of a very divided United States that’s growing further apart on a daily basis).

Kivelä’s art continues to favor that 1970’s grittiness prominent in that decade’s movies, deftly weaving realism with supernatural sights that carry a kind of violence to them on mere presence alone. Each character looks storied, the result of a long line of personal experiences that carry over into their overall looks.

Abbott 1973

Mattia Iacono’s colors complements the seventies vibe of the story beautifully with muted colors that make the darker elements jump out of the page even more when they manifest themselves. It creates a heaviness around the more horror-inclined sequences and can feel downright oppressive when Abbott as at the receiving end of them.

On the dark magic side of the story, Abbott 1973 is careful not to allow it to get lost in the social commentary that’s clearly in display in every page. Be it in hints of paranormal activity or outright terror, the hauntings Ahmed and Kivelä have cooked up for Abbott feel like an organic element of the story and they do their fair share of the worldbuilding. They are integral to the comic’s message and are smartly implemented.

Abbott 1973 #1 is a perfect continuation of Elena Abbott’s investigations into how magic has been taken over by racists bent on keeping America divided. Ahmed and Kivelä have one of the best characters in comics in their hands and they seem to be well aware of it. Abbott is the kind of creation one hopes becomes an industry staple, producing hundreds of stories for years to come.

Script: Saladin Ahmed Art: Sami Kivelä
Color: Mattia Iacono Letterer: Jim Campbell
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy and brush up on Detroit history


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Get a First Look at Abbott: 1973 #1 from Saladin Ahmed, Sami Kivelä, Mattia Iacono, and Jim Campbell

BOOM! Studios has revealed the first look at Abbott: 1973 #1, the premiere issue of a new series from writer Saladin Ahmed and artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. Debuting on January 20, 2021, this new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it.

Elena Abbott is one of Detroit’s toughest reporters—and after defeating the dark forces that murdered her husband, she’s focused on the most important election in the city’s history. But when someone uses dark magic to sabotage the campaign of the prospective first Black mayor of Detroit, it becomes clear to Abbott that the supernatural conspiracy in her city is even greater than she ever imagined. Now Abbott must exhaust all her abilities as a reporter and a supernatural savior to rescue Detroit—but at what cost to her own life?

Abbott: 1973 #1 features cover art by Taj Tenfold, Raúl Allén, and Jenny Frison.

Abbott: 1973 #1

Daredevil: Inferno. Comics of Marvel’s New York

In 1989 Daredevil‘s “Inferno” storyline from Ann Nocenti and John Romita Jr offered some pointed social commentary about NYC. It returns in Chip Zdarsky, Marco Checchetto, and Mattia Iacono‘s current series made for some uncanny reading for New Yorkers today.

Join Leslie Lee III of Struggle Sessions podcast and Scott Thorough of Zebras in America podcast as we swing into;

Classic Daredevil #260-266 

Current Daredevil issues #18-20

Also discussed: 

  • Scott’s lived experience of Hells Kitchen in the 1980s
  • Leslie on how the comics misunderstand the role cops play in gentrification
  • “Matt Murdock’s superpower is Catholic guilt”- Scott
  • Please tell your Fox watching Grandpa that New York is not on fire
  • Typhoid Mary’s character design is still hot
  • They made Stiltman scary
  • and as always, Matt Murdock is the worst boyfriend in comics

Abbott heads to 1973 in January from Saladin Ahmed, Sami Kivelä, Mattia Iacono, and Jim Campbell

BOOM! Studios has announced Abbott: 1973, a new series from Miles Morales: Spider-Man mastermind and Eisner Award-winning writer Saladin Ahmed and acclaimed artist Sami Kivelä, with colorist Mattia Iacono and letterer Jim Campbell. Debuting in January 2021, this new five-issue series returns to the Hugo Award-nominated world of Abbott, as the eponymous unstoppable reporter tackles a new corruption taking over Detroit in 1973 and the supernatural threat behind it.

Elena Abbott is one of Detroit’s toughest reporters—and after defeating the dark forces that murdered her husband, she’s focused on the most important election in the city’s history. But when someone uses dark magic to sabotage the campaign of the prospective first Black mayor of Detroit, it becomes clear to Abbott that the supernatural conspiracy in her city is even greater than she ever imagined. Now Abbott must exhaust all her abilities as a reporter and a supernatural savior to rescue Detroit—but at what cost to her own life?

Abbott: 1973 #1 will be available for sale in January 2021.

Preview: Marvel Action: Black Panther: Rise Together

Marvel Action: Black Panther: Rise Together

Vita Ayala (Author) Arianna Florean (Artist, Cover Artist) Mattia Iacono (Colorist)

Follow the adventures of T’Challa, the Black Panther, his sister Shuri, and the fantastic citizens of Wakanda in these middle grade-friendly adventures!

Every 25 years, Wakanda’s ruler trades places with one of their subjects to gain perspective on their kingdom. T’Challa’s turn has come, and while working in a Vibranium refinery, he uncovers a plot to sell the priceless metal on the black market. Plus, when one of the Black Panther’s advisers suffers an injury during an attack, the adviser requests the aid of a traditional healer over modern medicine. Shuri scoffs at the idea, but soon a curse forces her on an epic quest.

Collects issues #4–6 of the Marvel Action: Black Panther series.

Marvel Action: Black Panther: Rise Together
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