Tag Archives: lgbtqai

The Woods Wins this Year’s GLAAD Media Awards for Comics

The 28th annual GLAAD Media Awards were announced this past Saturday in Los Angeles, and The Woods won in the comic book category. Receiving credit were James Tynion IV, Michael Dialynas, Josan Gonzalez, Ed Dukeshire. The series is published by BOOM! Studios (with the latest issue out this week).

The GLAAD Media Awards recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community and the issues that affect their lives.

There’s two events, one held in Los Angeles on April 1 and another in New York City on May 6.

This year’s nominees included:

  • All-New X-Men (Marvel)by Dennis Hopeless, Mark Bagley, Andrew Hennessy, Paco Diaz, Nolan Woodard, Rachelle Rosenberg, Cory Petit
  • Black Panther (Marvel) – Ta-Nehisi Coates, Brian Stelfreeze, Chris Sprouse, Walden Wong, Karl C. Story, Laura Martin, Matt Milla, Joe Sabino, Clayton Cowles
  • DC Comics Bombshells (DC Comics) – Marguerite Bennett, Laura Braga, Sandy Jarrell, Maria Laura Sanapo, Mirka Andolfo, Pasquale Qualano, Marguerite Sauvage, Juan Albarran, Kelly Diane Fitzpatrick, J. Nanjan, Jeremy Lawson, Wendy Broome, Wes Abbott
  • Kim & Kim (Black Mask Studios) – Magdalene Visaggio, Eva Cabrera, Claudia Aguirre, Zakk Saam, Taylor Esposito
  • Love is Love (IDW Publishing/DC Comics) – anthology originated by Marc Andreyko
  • Lumberjanes (BOOM! Studios) – Shannon Watters, Kat Leyh, Carey Pietsch, Ayme Sotuyo, Carolyn Nowak, Maarta Laiho, Aubrey Aiese
  • Midnighter / Midnighter and Apollo (DC Comics) – Steve Orlando, David Messina, Aco, Hugo Petrus, Fernando Blanco, Gaetano Carlucci, Romulo Fajardo, Jr., Jeremy Cox, Tom Napolitano, Josh Reed
  • Patsy Walker, A.K.A Hellcat! (Marvel) – Kate Leth, Brittney L. Williams, Natasha Allegri, Megan Wilson, Rachelle Rosenberg, Clayton Cowles
  • Saga (Image Comics) – Brian K. Vaughan, Fiona Staples, Fonografiks
  • The Woods (BOOM! Studios)James Tynion IV, Michael Dialynas, Josan Gonzalez, Ed Dukeshire

Congrats to everyone!

(via The Hollywood Reporter)

Prism Comics Announces the 2017 Queer Press Grant Winner

The recipient of the 2017 Prism Comics Queer Press Grant was announced at the Queers, Comics & Social Justice panel by Prism Comics Queer Press Grant chair Elizabeth Beier, at Wondercon.

This year’s winner is Tee Franklin for Bingo Love. Tee hopes her story will let Black youth know it’s okay to be queer, and strongly represent seniors.

The Queer Press Grant is awarded to assist comics creators in self-publishing comics with LGBT characters or themes. Entries are judged first and foremost by artistic merit, followed by concerns such as financial need, proposal presentation, and the project’s contribution to the LGBT community. They are reviewed by the Prism Board, past recipients of the Grant, and Prism’s Advisory Board.

Love Is Love Raises Over $165,000 for Victims of the Pulse Nightclub Massacre

Last December, IDW Publishing, with support from DC Entertainment, created Love is Love, an anthology graphic novel that united the comic book community in support of the victims and families affected by the tragedy at Pulse nightclub. It has been announced that the graphic novel has raised more than $165,000 from digital and print sales. Through Equality Florida, the proceeds have been donated to the OneOrlando Fund to assist the victims and families impacted.

Love is Love was conceived and curated by comic book writer Marc Andreyko, under the editorial guidance of IDW Publishing’s Sarah Gaydos and DC Entertainment’s Jamie S. Rich, who called upon his industry colleagues to lend their talents to a benefit comic book. The overwhelming response he received in support of the project resulted in contributions from comic and entertainment luminaries including Grant Morrison, Gail Simone, Jim Lee, Paul Dini, Amanda Conner, Scott Snyder, Tom King, Brian Michael Bendis, Steve Orlando, Cat Staggs, Kieron Gillen, Mark Millar, Marguerite Bennett, Phil Jimenez, David Mack, Brad Meltzer, Taran Killam, Patton Oswalt, Damon Lindelof, Morgan Spurlock and Matt Bomer, among many others.

The graphic novel is currently in its fourth printing, and the remaining copies will be donated to Equality Florida and sold as fundraising items.

A fifth printing is forthcoming, with all proceeds from this and future editions of Love is Love being donated to LGBTQA charities.

GLAAD Announces their Media Awards Nominees. Check out the 10 Comics Nominated

GLAAD has announced the nominees for the 28th Annual GLAAD Media Awards. Comics were well represented with ten nominations that vary quite a lot in their content, creators, and publishers.

The GLAAD Media Awards recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community and the issues that affect their lives.

There’s two events, one held in Los Angeles on April 1 and another in New York City on May 6.

This year’s nominees include:

  • All-New X-Men (Marvel)by Dennis Hopeless, Mark Bagley, Andrew Hennessy, Paco Diaz, Nolan Woodard, Rachelle Rosenberg, Cory Petit
  • Black Panther (Marvel) – Ta-Nehisi Coates, Brian Stelfreeze, Chris Sprouse, Walden Wong, Karl C. Story, Laura Martin, Matt Milla, Joe Sabino, Clayton Cowles
  • DC Comics Bombshells (DC Comics) – Marguerite Bennett, Laura Braga, Sandy Jarrell, Maria Laura Sanapo, Mirka Andolfo, Pasquale Qualano, Marguerite Sauvage, Juan Albarran, Kelly Diane Fitzpatrick, J. Nanjan, Jeremy Lawson, Wendy Broome, Wes Abbott
  • Kim & Kim (Black Mask Studios) – Magdalene Visaggio, Eva Cabrera, Claudia Aguirre, Zakk Saam, Taylor Esposito
  • Love is Love (IDW Publishing/DC Comics) – anthology originated by Marc Andreyko
  • Lumberjanes (BOOM! Studios) – Shannon Watters, Kat Leyh, Carey Pietsch, Ayme Sotuyo, Carolyn Nowak, Maarta Laiho, Aubrey Aiese
  • Midnighter / Midnighter and Apollo (DC Comics) – Steve Orlando, David Messina, Aco, Hugo Petrus, Fernando Blanco, Gaetano Carlucci, Romulo Fajardo, Jr., Jeremy Cox, Tom Napolitano, Josh Reed
  • Patsy Walker, A.K.A Hellcat! (Marvel) – Kate Leth, Brittney L. Williams, Natasha Allegri, Megan Wilson, Rachelle Rosenberg, Clayton Cowles
  • Saga (Image Comics) – Brian K. Vaughan, Fiona Staples, Fonografiks
  • The Woods (BOOM! Studios)James Tynion IV, Michael Dialynas, Josan Gonzalez, Ed Dukeshire

Congrats to all of the nominees and you can watch the full announcement below.

Kidrobot to Donate Proceeds of Pride Labbits to OneOrlando

Like most of the world, Kidrobot is shocked and saddened to learn about the recent tragedy at Pulse nightclub in Orlando. Their thoughts are with the victims, their families and the entire LGBT community. They feel it is imperative to do their part to show their support in light of this terrible event. From now through the end of July, all proceeds from Kidrobot’s Labbit Pride Packs will be donated to the OneOrlando Fund. The Labbit Pride Packs are currently available for purchase at Kidrobot.com.

The purpose of the OneOrlando Fund is to provide a way to help respond to the needs of the Orlando community after the effects of the Pulse tragedy. You can learn more about the fund on the OneOrlando website.

As a company that celebrates diversity and acceptance, Kidrobot feels it is necessary to lend their support in this devastating time. They are heartbroken by this tragedy and hope their support will help the community affected.

Kidrobot to Donate Proceeds of Pride Labbits to OneOrlando

#QueerSelfLove is Necessary in Comics

It’s been a brutal time in LGBTQA communities. We are rightfully focused on taking action to protect our communities and stand in solidarity with Muslims and Latinx people; especially LGBTQA Muslim and Latinx people. We must take care of each other. That includes self care.

I don’t want to center the story on people like me. I want to tell you to read the words of latinx LGBTQA people like Delma Catalina Limones,

2016-06-15_1658But I also want to make space to share something beautiful I saw on twitter today.

And then it went viral.

Countless people joined in. It did my soul a whole lot of good to see how many people in comics participated. Fans, writers, artists, critics all of the above. Comics is queer as hell. It has always been queer since the invention of Wonder Woman if not even older.

But right now LGBTQA people in comics and fan communities are organizing like never before. It is already making a difference. I want to thank all of the beautiful people speaking out today. Here are a few of them:

Prism Comics Awards the 2016 Queer Press Grant

The recipient of the 2016 Prism Comics Queer Press Grant was announced at the ALPHABET -10 Years of the Prism Comics Queer Press Grant panel by Prism Comics Queer Press Grant chair Jon Macy, at WonderCon. This year was a tie between Catherine Esguerra for Eighty Days and Elizabeth Beier for I Like Your Headband.

The Queer Press Grant is awarded to assist comics creators in self publishing comics with LGBT characters or themes. Entries are judged first and foremost by artistic merit, followed by concerns such as financial need, proposal presentation, and the project’s contribution to the LGBT community. They are reviewed by the Prism Board, past recipients of the Grant, and Prism’s Advisory Board.

The Queer Press Grant is an all volunteer organization funded entirely by donations from comic book professionals and readers. Since its inception, the Queer Press Grant has been awarded to –

2005: Steve MacIsaac – Shiftlifter                       2010: Jon Macy – Fearful Hunter        
2006: Megan Gedris – YU+ME                                 2011: Robert Kirby – Three  
2007: Justin Hall – True Travel Tales                    2012: Christine Smith – The Princess
2007: Tommy Roddy – Pride High                         2012: Blue Delliquanti – O Human Star      
2008: Pam Harrison – House of the Muses         2013: Hazel Newlevant – If This Be Sin
2009: Ed Luce – Wuvable Oaf                                 2014: Calvin Gimplevich                    
2009: Eric Orner – Storybox                                   2014:Emiliano Quale 
2010: Tana Ford – Duck                                           2015:  Dave Davenport -Stray Bullet
                                                                                     

Prism Comics is an all volunteer organization dedicated to promoting LGBTQ comics. You can help greatly by making a donation to the Queer Press Grant.

Around the Tubes

It was new comic book day yesterday! What’d folks get, and what will you be reading this Christmas Eve?

While you let us know, here’s some comic book news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

New York Times – Coming Out as Gay Superheroes – An interesting read.

GamePolitics – Congresswoman Katherine Clark promotes new anti-swatting bill – Good!

Kotaku – Arkham Knight’s New DLC Superbly Spotlights Batman’s Saddest Enemy – Who’s still playing?

The New Yorker – “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” and the superhero survivor. – Awesome to see this in the New Yorker!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Comic Vine – Astonishing Ant-Man #3

The Rainbow Hub – Batman and Robin Eternal #12

Comic Vine – Bloodshot Reborn #9

CBR – Dark Knight III: The Master Race #2

Comic Vine – Extraordinary X-Men #4

The Rainbow Hub – Fight Club 2 #8

CBR – Patsy Walker AKA Hellcat #1

Talking Comics – Patsy Walker AKA Hellcat #1

Comic Vine – Robin: Son of Batman #7

Did We Just Get Our First “Out” Transformer?

There’s some spoilers here, so if you don’t want to find out what happens in Transformers #44, out today from IDW Publishing, then you might want to leave and come back later.

Still here? Ok, lets begin.

needlenoseWritten by John Barber with art by Andrew Griffith, issue focuses on Tracks and Needlenose, brothers split due to the war. The issue focuses on their relationship and history before, and after the war. Needlenose in the beginning is swayed to Megatron’s cause by Horri-Bull. Needlenose’s cause is more about disenfranchisement, and haves and have nots, while Megatron was much grander and focused on the corruption of the ruling class as a whole. While the two views align, they’re not quite the same thing.

And now some more background about the relationship that was Needlenose and Horri-Bull. For those that don’t know, Needlenose and Horri-Bull teamed up post war harassing bots that took neither side in the war referred to as Nails. This led to a confrontation where Horri-Bull refused to back down in his harassment forcing Bumblebee to detonate a chip blowing up Horri-Bull’s head.

That incident has clearly stuck with Needlenose, who in a confrontation with Tracks in a bar declares that Horri-Bull was the “one bot I’ve ever loved.” Wait…. what!?

In the Transformers world there’s a concept called Conjux Endura. Some have said this is the idea of a spouse, but it might be better to describe it as power of attorney. It has come out more when a bot’s life is on the line and a decision has to be made. The concept isn’t universally accepted in the Transformers universe, with some dismissing close relationships like this as embarrassing.

firestar_nauticaFor those that have been reading IDW’s Transformer comics for a while now, this isn’t the first “male” bot pairing though, while it might be the first to use that word “love.”

In Transformers: More Than Meets the EyeChromedome and Rewind have been an inseparable couple for quite some time now. A “same-sex” couple that stay by each other’s side through the ages. At times the coupling to me felt more Maverick/Goose in Top Gun (yes, I chose that pairing specifically), but it’s hard to argue the two aren’t together in ways that are more than friends.

More recently, with the introduction of the female Transformer dominated world of Caminus, we’ve also been introduced to the concept of Amicua Endura, which Firestorm and Nautica (two female bots) are. This one though did have a different tone, with Firestorm referring to Nautica as her “best friend,” and they “lived together.” Later on the word “platonic” is used in reference to the concept. It’s a similar concept to Conjux Endura, but clearly more “best friend” than real relationship. In this particular case Sorority Sister might not be too far off either.

The only other instance where the word “love” was used was with Chromedome and Rewind. Upon his death, in a final message good-bye Rewind says something “he doesn’t say enough” “I love you.” If there were doubts about how deep the two’s relationship went, this scene clearly defined it.

In an email from Transformers writer John Barber in response to my inquiry, he said I’m “not reading too much into it.” And reminded me Needlenose and Horri-Bull weren’t the first.

Many might see a comic based on a toy line and dismiss it. But, for years now the comic has been one of the most politically, and socially aware comics on the market. It has not only explored revolution, governmental collapse, nation building, class warfare, and more. The series in the last year has introduced more female named characters than many comic universes currently have. Arcee, Windblade, Chromia, Nautica, Firestorm, Proxima, Acceleron, Velocity, Skystalker, Javelin, Exocet, Skimmer, a whole planet dominated by female bots in Caminus, and the all female combiner Victorion. The series has grown to not just be politically aware, but also one of the most progressive comics out there. The fact it can have a scene such as Needlenose as if it’s just an everyday occurrence is energon icing on the cake.

This series and universe is expanding its representation while other companies are retrogressively shrinking it. For that we should celebrate and give props where they’re due.

Robinson Apologized for Airboy Issue 2 Because We United and Took Action

“If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will”. – Frederick Douglass*

Airboy02_CoverActivism gets results. Graphic Policy and The Rainbow Hub were criticized by people in the comics community when we took action against the extremely transphobic second issue of Airboy. But because we raised hell we made progress. That’s the lesson people should be taking away from this.

On June 30th Graphic Policy and The Rainbow Hub‘s Emma Houxbois published stories calling attention to the rampant transphobia in the second issue of the Airboy comic. I’d lavished praise over the comic’s first issue. We knew the context the story took place in and it was the story itself that was transphobic, not just words that characters said while “behaving badly”. Our sites’ explained how the comic’s narrative repeats the dangerous myth that trans women are out there trying to “trick” men into sex with them. We explained that this myth endangers trans people and in a world in which “trans panic” still gets used as an excuse to murder trans people we need to react as strongly as possible when it is repeated.

And we heard crickets in response.

On July 2nd I emailed GLAAD, the most powerful media watchdog for LGBTQ people. We know that when GLAAD speaks out they can’t be ignored and the comics world knows it too– since GLAAD’s known for giving awards to comics that have positive portrayals of LGBTQ characters. GLAAD sprung into action. They issued a statement. And between their clout and the outcry we organized, we forced the comics community to pay attention to the problems in the comic.

And then James Robinson apologized. Robinson heard what we said, and he listened and explained that he now realizes that he “fucked-up” (his words) . I’m not trans but his apology seemed earnest and thoughtful to me. Some trans people were not impressed but others have responded favorably to his apology.

Only July 6, artist Greg Hinkle went so far as to THANK people who spoke up on Twitter and offer to continue the conversation at Comic-Con.

Meanwhile, what about all those defenders of Airboy #2? They continue to promote bigotry. Robinson acknowledged the problems with his comic. He wants to do better. When the artists who created the comic are saying that they now see the problem in what they made, their defenders should probably take a minute and use their hearts and their heads to listen. More importantly, they need to stop and listen to transwomen like Emma Houxbois who’s written powerfully about the problems in this comic and in comics at large.

In the end, the defenders of Airboy want to marginalize comics as an medium because they want to perpetuate a comics industry that excludes people who aren’t like them. They are bringing comics down. Also, to all of the “serious comics journalists” who were willing to acknowledge that there  “may be problems with Airboy 2″ but criticized Graphic Policy and Emma for demanding the book be pulled? Guess what. We got results. If we had played it quiet and POLITE we wouldn’t have brought the attention we brought to the problem.

Remember, we started out by just writing reviews that explained the comic’s transphobia and no one was talking. As soon as we demanded the book be pulled the conversation exploded. This chart Brett made illustrates the silence around Airboy until we made our demands. GLAAD has made it very clear: activism is key to creating change. They said:

“GLAAD is very grateful that the Rainbow Hub and Graphic Policy brought ‘Airboy’ #2 to our attention, and used their social media reach to spark an online discussion about the transphobia in the issue. GLAAD was happy to use our platform to boost their signal, and then to work with James Robinson to distribute his response.” – Nick Adams, Director of Programs for Transgender Media at GLAAD.

If you value politeness over creating change then you don’t really care about making change.  

As Katie Schenkel aka ‏@JustPlainTweets tweeted “People who care more about the idea and purity of ART than about marginalized people’s humanity being chipped away bum me the hell out.”

And From @sarahnmoon: ” If your gentleness is tone-policing and silencing anger, it’s not truly gentle because it doesn’t care about what others are hurt by”

Oh, and what of Image comics – who had their twitter icon wrapped in the rainbow flag while publishing a transphobic comic? Image is still silent. But they took down the flag….

To everyone who tried to change the conversation into a debate over censorship, I recommend Brett’s blog post that explains the difference between our demands and actual censorship (which we oppose). Meanwhile, you can buy two Image Comics that are trans positive right away: The Wicked + The Divine and the new Arclight. You should also buy Sophie Campbell and Kelly Thompson’s hilarious, youth-friendly and suspenseful Jem and the Holograms which has a trans character and is by a trans artist.

But using your comics buying dollars to support positive portrayals of trans people isn’t enough. We can’t just leave it at that. Not when comics are repeating dangerous tropes that their audience can’t even identify as a problem. Not when people are making money off of transphobia.

So yes, we took action. 

And no we don’t apologize. 

* Note on that Frederick Douglas quote: I’m not comparing what we’re doing to the scale of Frederick Douglas’s work. I use his quote to illustrate the point we are making and to show the theory behind activism.

For more on this story and comics media activism listen to our podcast from July 6th.

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