Tag Archives: kid flash

DC Collectibles Announces PVC Statue Line and More for August 2018

DC Collectibles is kicking off the New Year in a big way by revealing a fresh new slate featuring two unique statue lines. Taking center stage in August 2018 will be a first-ever PVC statue line from DC Collectibles titled DC Core. The line will present striking new interpretations of fan-favorite DC characters and will be offered at an attractive $50.00 price point. DC Collectibles will also release an inventive multi-part statue set that showcases the Teen Titans characters as seen in the famous New Teen Titans #1 cover by legendary artist George Pérez. Additional DC Collectibles items debuting in August 2018 include a Designer Series Batman mini statue by Brian Bolland, a Batman: The Animated Series Harley Quinn expressions pack and a DC Cover Girls: Batgirl statue based on the artwork of superstar artist Joëlle Jones.

Charting into new territory, DC Core is DC Collectibles’ first line of 9″ scale statues produced in PVC. The character designs and attitudes are conjured up by DC Collectibles’ executive creative director Jim Fletcher and his award-winning design team, and will feature dazzling, dynamic poses. Each figure will stand upon a character-specific base that will include the same intricate details as the statue itself.

The Joker is the first DC character to be transformed into a DC Core statue, and the spectacular sculpt by David Pereira features the Clown Prince of Crime holding his prized Joker cane on top of his equally iconic “HAHAHA”-themed base. The Joker statue hits stores August 2018 and will be followed by Batman, Batgirl and Wonder Woman statues later this year.

DC Collectibles will also release the first two characters from the company’s 6″ scale New Teen Titans multi-part statue set. The set stars the entire superhero team featured in George Pérez’s popular New Teen Titans #1 cover—Starfire, Robin, Beast Boy, Cyborg, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl and Raven—and the versatile bases allow fans to become their own storytellers. Fans can display one or a few of their favorite characters independently, or for those wanting to own the whole set, the bases fit perfectly together to recreate the iconic Pérez cover image. Each sold separately, Starfire and Robin are the first characters to hit shelves in August. The remaining characters will be released at separate times throughout the year.

See below for the list of DC Collectibles items debuting in August 2018 and beyond!

DC Core PVC Statues

  • Size: 1:8/9″ scale
  • MSRP: $50.00 (Each sold separately)
  • Characters
    • The Joker (On sale August 2018)
    • Batman (On sale September 2018)
    • Batgirl (On sale November 2018)
    • Wonder Woman (On sale November 2018)

The New Teen Titans Multi-Part Statue Set

  • Size: 1:12/6″ scale
  • MSRP: $80.00 (Each sold separately)
  • Based on the artwork by George Pérez
  • Sculpted by Joe Menna
  • Characters
    • Starfire (On sale August 2018)
    • Robin (On sale August 2018)
    • Beast Boy (On sale September 2018)
    • Cyborg (On sale September 2018)
    • Kid Flash (On sale October 2018)
    • Wonder Girl (On sale October 2018)
    • Raven (On sale November 2018)

Batman: The Animated Series: Harley Quinn Expressions Pack

  • Size: 1:12/6″ scale
  • MSRP: $50.00
  • On sale August 2018
  • Accessories include: eight different expressions, two hyenas, multiple pieces of weaponry, roller skates, a fish head costume and a deluxe base

DC Cover Girls: Batgirl by Joëlle Jones Statue

  • Size: 1:8/9″ scale
  • MSRP: $125.00
  • Designed by Joëlle Jones
  • Sculpted by Jack Mathews
  • On sale August 2018

Designer Series: Batman by Brian Bolland Mini Statue

  • Size: 1:10/7″ Scale
  • Based on the artwork from Brian Bolland’s Eisner Award-winning BATMAN: THE KILLING JOKE
  • Sculpted by David Giraud
  • MSRP: $80.00
  • On sale August 2018

Fear of a Black Kid Flash. Not so Much a Female One.

wally westAn interesting thing happened last week when in the Teen Titans version of Futures End that a new Kid Flash was introduced in the wake of the company-wide crossover.  Or more accurately another new Kid Flash was introduced. Earlier this year some fans were upset at the long-awaited return of Wally West to the DC universe, the problem that they were upset that the character was black. While this was not too much different from some other reactions – such as the reveal that the Earth 2 Alan Scott is gay – it is interesting especially after this new female Kid Flash was released to little fanfare or reaction. No one at all seemed to complain about this new character, seemingly also taking over the role of Wally West, though the incursion was potentially just as comprehensive. After all the character is never named and could have just as likely been named Walda or Wallis as any other name (thus allowing a nickname of Wally.)

Although they are based off of general consensus and are generally pretty silly, the so-called rules of the internet cover this topic to a degree, specifically rule 63 which states that for every male character that a female version of this character also exists.  While not absolutely true, it is often the case at least with the most popular characters. Some are direct rip-offs, though very rarely does a character assume the actual identity of the character, though the new female Thor is potentially going to change this. The female characters generally are presented in one of two ways. Either they are a female character that is modified into the costume of a male hero, as in the case of Stephanie Brown in the costume of Robin or May Parker in Spider-Man’s costume, or with separate characters in obviously feminine costumes as in the case with Supergirl and Batgirl.  In these cases though the character is separate and not taking over for the main role. While this in itself could be interpreted as a statement of gender, it is still worth noting that each character has their own self and their own past.

kflashThis being the case it would seem that the problem with the case of Wally West is not that directly of skin colour but that of identity. Wally West was an established character for many, and to change something as deep as skin color for many readers meant a fundamental change for the readers. Is this fair though?  If indeed the female character had been named either Wallis or Walda (I know these are more obscure names) would that have been so easily forgiven?

Before answering that it is maybe relevant to have a look at some of the major black characters from the history of comics. A lot of the major black characters came from a time when being black was a big part of their identity, especially with the introduction of these characters in the silver age.  In the case of Black Panther or Black Lightning, there was no question about their skin color as it was right in their names. While this did not hold true in every character (such as with Falcon or War Machine) it was still a notable part of their identity. In the comic book setting where the suffix “–man” is the expected commonality, it was necessary for a time to distinguish between skin color and gender. Black Lightning is perhaps one of the worst cases of this, as for a time his true identity as a black man is hidden behind his hero facade of being a jive-talking street character. He was not allowed to be educated as a hero, instead he was forced into racial stereotypes. Still those stereotypes existed, and they were even there with other characters. If Black Panther were called White Panther instead, the main association with the color to the character would not be skin color.  Instead, someone would expect that the character has some kind of powers related to the word “white.”

There exists a lot of other names in comics to distinguish one version from another. One major example is the previously mentioned example of –girl which is used almost exclusively for female versions of male characters (with the exception of the Legion of Super Heroes characters as well as Wonder Girl), but in terms of the Flash there was already a descriptor for this difference – “Kid”.

As the character gained more depth though, he was no longer associated with his own name and instead that of another, Wally. He became a real hero in the way that real heroes do, that by association by their non-hero names is almost as evident as with their superhero names. In this way it is not possible to have a character named Batman that is not Bruce or a Superman that is not Clark. The question is though, is whether skin color and gender are so tied to those identities. It would seem as though the answer in both cases is yes, except the more so for skin color. Not all fans, but some fans are willing to make fewer exceptions for a black version of a character than for a female version, and perhaps some of this is tied to identity but some is not.

A distinguishing factor here is the previously mentioned aspect of power. Even Supergirl, who is as much Kryptonian as Superman, is never said to be able to match him in power, despite their powers having nothing to do with their specific gender physiology. Equally Stephanie Brown, for the short time that she took over as Robin was never seen as his equal, even being regarded by Batman as an unnecessary risk to be allowed to act in the role. It is thus the case that female characters rarely break the gender role/stereotype of the female gender, but it is not the case with a black character. Black versions of the white characters are usually just as strong and able at superheroics, and this is likely also part of the outrage over the characters. That in some ways the girls will never compete truly for the title, but that the black men can, and this is the true danger with a black version of a favorite character. A black character makes the original white character replaceable, while a female character only makes a lesser powerful version of that main character. In the first case fans will often reject the change, but in the second case it is more acceptable.

In light of all the commentary about the medium in recent months, be it over the black Wally West or over the comments about the new direction for Wonder Woman, it is important to note that certain aspects of the medium and their fans are still stuck with some outdated thinking.

Young Justice Season 1 Volume 2, Own it on DVD October 25

The second volume of the first season of Young Justice hits shelves and you can own it on DVD October 25 from Warner Bros.

In Young Justice, being a teenager means proving yourself over and over—to peers, parents, teachers, mentors and, ultimately, to yourself. But what if you’re not just a normal teenager? What if you’re a teenage super hero? Are you ready to join the ranks of the great heroes and prove you’re worthy of the Justice League? That’s exactly what the members of Young Justice—Robin, Aqualad, Kid Flash, Superboy, Miss Martian and Artemis—will found out, whether they have what it takes to be a proven hero. Based upon characters from DC Comics.

I’ve never seen an episode of the cartoon series myself, so really looking forward to sitting down and check it out!

Young Justice Season 1 Vol 2 Boxart