Tag Archives: kelly sue deconnick

The Sandman is Getting 30th Anniversary Editions Courtesy of Vertigo

Vertigo is celebrating of The Sandman‘s 30th anniversary with brand-new collected editions of Neil Gaiman’s seminal story. Following the announcement of a new Gaiman-curated imprint called the Sandman Universe, launching this August, Gaiman’s original series will be rereleased monthly beginning in October.

The anniversary editions will include special introductions from legendary creators including best-selling authors Patrick Rothfuss, Kelly Sue DeConnick, writer/producer Paul Dini, author/comedian/actor Patton Oswalt and more. Each collection will also feature new, original covers from the original Sandman cover artist, Dave McKean.

Gaiman’s new imprint will launch on August 8, 2018 with The Sandman Universe #1, followed by four new titles: The Dreaming, House of Whispers, Lucifer, and Books of Magic. For those who want to discover the origins of these new stories, they can start at the beginning with these anniversary editions.

The Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes and Noctures 30th Anniversary Edition collects issues #1-8, written by Gaiman with art by Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg, and Malcolm Jones III. It will also feature an introduction from Patrick Rothfuss, best-selling author of The Kingkiller Chronicles, and will be available in comics shops on October 24, and everywhere books are sold on October 30.

DC Entertainment Announces “Black Label” Including a Kelly Sue DeConnick/Phil Jimenez Wonder Woman!

DC Entertainment isn’t done announcing new comic imprints. The company has already announced two lines aimed at younger readers, DC Ink and DC Zoom, but there’s also a line curated by Brian Michael Bendis in the works. Now, the comic publisher has announced their latest, “DC Black Label,” which will pair some of the best creators with the best characters.

In the announcement, DC Entertainment co-publisher Jim Lee explained:

Many of our perennially best-selling, critically acclaimed books were produced when we unleashed our top talent on standalone, often out-of-continuity projects featuring our most iconic characters, a prime example being Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns. Creating DC Black Label doubles down on our commitment to working with all-star talent and trusting them to tell epic, moving stories that only they can tell with the highest levels of creative freedom.

There’s already numerous projects announced:

  • Superman: Year One – Written by Frank Miller with art by John Romita Jr.
  • Batman: Damned – Written by Brian Azzarello with art by Lee Bermejo
  • Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons – Written by Kelly Sue DeConnick with art by Phil Jimenez
  • The Other History of the DC Universe – Written by John Ridley
  • Batman: Last Knight on Earth – Written by Scott Snyder with art by Greg Capullo
  • Wonder Woman: Diana’s Daughter – Written by Greg Rucka

Each story will be released in a format dictated by creators and take place outside of DC Universe canon. It allows the creators to explore the characters and take full advantage. Wonder Woman Historia: The Amazons tells the story of Wonder Woman’s people from their creation until the arrival of Steve Trevor on Paradise Island. Wonder Woman: Diana’s Daughter is a story set 20 years in the future.

The line will have Mark Doyle as executive editor and they’re expected to launch in August with Superman: Year One. Check out all of the synopses and art below:

SUPERMAN: YEAR ONE from Frank Miller (THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT: MASTER RACE) and John Romita Jr. (ALL-STAR BATMAN, SUPERMAN)
A groundbreaking, definitive treatment of Superman’s classic origin story in honor of his 80th anniversary. This story details new revelations that reframe the Man of Steel’s most famous milestones—from Kal-El’s frantic exile from Krypton, to Clark Kent’s childhood in Kansas, to his inevitable rise to become the most powerful and inspiring superhero of all time.

BATMAN: LAST KNIGHT ON EARTH from Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, the creative team behind DARK KNIGHTS: METAL
Batman wakes up in a desert. He doesn’t know what year it is or how The Joker’s head is alive in a jar beside him, but it’s the beginning of a quest unlike anything the Dark Knight has undertaken before. In this strange future, villains are triumphant and society has liberated itself from the burden of ethical codes. Fighting to survive while in search of answers, Bruce Wayne uncovers the truth about his role in this new world—and begins the last Batman story ever told.

BATMAN: DAMNED from Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo, the creative team behind JOKER
On a deserted Gotham City bridge, a body is found. Whispers spread the news: Joker is dead. But is this a dream come true or a nightmare being born? Now Batman and DC’s outlaw magician John Constantine must hunt the truth through a Gotham City hellscape. The city’s supernatural recesses are laced with hints about a killer’s identity, but the Dark Knight’s descent into horror will test his sanity and the limits of rationality, as he must face a horror that doesn’t wear a mask.

WONDER WOMAN HISTORIA: THE AMAZONS from Kelly Sue DeConnick (Bitch Planet) and Phil Jimenez (INFINITE CRISIS)
A Homeric epic of the lost history of the Amazons and Queen Hippolyta’s rise to power. Featuring monsters and myths, this three-book saga spans history from the creation of the Amazons to the moment Steve Trevor washes up on the shores of Paradise Island, changing our world forever.

WONDER WOMAN: DIANA’S DAUGHTER (working title) from Greg Rucka (WONDER WOMAN, BATWOMAN)
It’s been 20 years since the world stopped looking to the skies for hope, help, and inspiration. Now the world keeps its eyes down, and the powers that have risen have every intention of keeping things that way. Amongst a scattered, broken resistance, a young woman seeks to reclaim what has been forgotten, and on the way will learn the truth about herself, her heritage, and her destiny.

THE OTHER HISTORY OF THE DC UNIVERSE from John Ridley (12 Years a Slave, THE AMERICAN WAY)
A compelling literary series analyzing iconic DC moments and charting sociopolitical gains through the perspectives of DC Super Heroes who come from traditionally disenfranchised groups, including John Stewart, Extraño, Vixen, Supergirl, Katana and Rene Montoya, among others. At its core, the story focuses on the lives of those behind the costumes, and their endeavors to overcome real-world issues. It isn’t about saving the world, it’s about having the strength to simply be who you are.

The world of Princeless Has gotten bigger with the Girls Rock/Girls Leadership Anthology debuting on comiXology!

Princeless has expanded into a new charity anthology! Most of the proceeds for this anthology will go toward two organizations: Girls Rock NC and Girls Leadership. The anthology was announced on Graphic Policy Radio in 2016.

The anthology features original stories featuring or inspired by Adrienne, Raven, and Bedelia. The fantastic comic creators in the first issue include Kelly Sue Deconnick, Kit Cox, Alicia Whitley, Bri Rudd, Ro Stein, Ted Brandt, Jason Strutz, Kyle Latino, and a cover by Katie Cook!

Creator/writer Jeremy Whitley commented in the announcement:

Princeless has always been about providing an empowering message to girls. Now, through the proceeds of this anthology, we look forward to giving to organizations that directly empower girls. We’re thrilled to be working with this slate of superstar creators and can’t wait to share more of our world with you!

Later on this year, the anthology will be collected into a physical edition you can purchase. The first issue is out now.

Femme Magnifique Gets a New Print Through IDW’s Black Crown

Femme Magnifique, the wildly successful Kickstarter comic book anthology, is headed back to print for a beautiful softcover edition this September. It is a celebration of 50 iconic women who shattered glass ceilings and changed the course of history in the process.

Told by over 100 of the most talented creators in comics from around the world, Femme Magnifique features 3-page short stories about women from the world of music, art, politics, and science. Explored from a personal angle, the subjects of these mini-biopics include Kate BushOctavia ButlerRumiko TakahashiAda LovelaceMisty CopelandMargaret SangerMichelle ObamaUrsula K. Le GuinSally RideHarriet Tubman and more!

Femme Magnifique was conceived and co-curated by Shelly Bond and Kristy Miller & Brian Miller of Hi-Fi Colour Design. It features contributions from such comic book luminaries as Cecil Castellucci, Marguerite BennettBill SienkiewiczJen BartelMike CareyKelly Sue DeConnickTini HowardElsa CharretierTess FowlerRafael AlbuquerqueTee FranklinGilbert HernandezMing DoyleMatt WagnerJim RuggGail SimoneMags VisaggioMarguerite SauvageGerard WayPhilip BondHope NicholsonSanford GreeneSonny LiewJen HickmanMark BuckinghamPeter GrossTyler CrookDan Parent, and Kieron Gillen, among many others.

Maxing out at nearly $100,000 raised for the Kickstarter edition, earning over 240% of its initial goal, Femme Magnifique found its audience swiftly. Now, those who missed out on the first go-round can add this collection to their library packed with new bonus material including a foreword, behind-the-scenes process pages, and more.

The new paperback edition of Femme Magnifique will become available on September 4, 2018 and can now be pre-ordered using ISBN: 978-1684053209

Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Vol. 1 Arrives in December

A dizzyingly talented roster of noncompliant creators, joining forces with series creators Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine De Landro, will release the first trade paperback collection of Bitch Planet: Triple Feature this December.

Ripped directly from the world of Bitch Planet, a crack team of creators spin 15 teeth-clenching tales of rage, revolution, and ridicule. Patriarchy beware…this sci-fi kidney punch can’t be stopped!

Within the pages of Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Vol. 1, readers can enjoy the writing talents of: Cheryl Lynn Eaton, Andrew Aydin, Conley Lyons, Che Grayson, Danielle Henderson, Jordan Clark, Alissa Sallah, Dylan Meconis, Kit Cox, Marc Deschamps, Sara Woolley, Vita Ayala, Bassey Nyambi, Alobi, Nyambi Nyambi, Jon Tsuei, and Matt Fraction, and delight in the artistic stylings of Dylan Meconis, Sara Woolley, Maria Fröhlich, Joanna Estep, Craig Yeung, Sharon Lee De La Cruz, Ted Brandt, Ro Stein, Naomi Franquiz, Alec Valerius, Vanesa R. Del Rey, Mindy Lee, Rossi Gifford, Chris Visions, Saskia Gutekunst, and Elsa Charretier.

Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Vol. 1 (Diamond code: OCT170620, ISBN: 978-1-5343-0529-8) hits comic book stores Wednesday, December 13th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, November 6th.

Dragon Con 2017: The “Men In Comics” Panel

Good morning, Dragon Con,” said Kelly Sue Deconnick, bright and bubbly to start the panel. “We’ve asked you here today to join us in our destruction of the patriarchy.”

It certainly felt like the type of crowd to be devoted to destruction of the patriarchy in the room. It was 11 a.m. on a Monday at Dragon Con, where everything feels exhausting and hungover, so you certainly have to be committed to be here. Not to mention it’s a Women In Comics panel.

At least so we thought.

As the panel began with Deconnick, Babs Tarr, Megan Hutchinson, and moderator Jami Jones, they revealed to us that after several discussions over the double edged sword of Women In Comics panels and a few last minute decisions, this was not going to be the rote but necessary Women in Comics panel. Instead, it was going to be a panel of all women talking about Men in Comics.

What then ensued was 60 minutes of sarcastic brilliance on a Labor Day morning.

Presented in the way of all-white or all-men panels on diversity or women in comics, the panelists took it to the next level, briefly transporting to a world where all the dense questions and bad takes about diversity in comics were applied to white men.

“People are understandably guarded about fake male fans,” Deconnick said during the Q&A when asked how to reach male readers, followed by a suggestion about testing the cred of said fake male fans a little bit.

Another attendee asked for advice as a queer woman about how to mentor straight men getting into comics. Tips about critiquing their art at their table or meeting up at “BarCon” after the show abound at that point. So did the laughter.

It certainly helped that the audience was all in on the joke, especially the men in attendance who were great sports about the way the panelists talked to them condescendingly in the way some male professionals speak about women. Deconnick even asked one male attendee a twirl for the room. It really all did feel too familiar, which made it even more ridiculous.

There was even two new character tests created during the panel! The first being “The Bendis Test,” which is to see if two named male characters talk about anything besides a woman. The other is “The Sexy Hammer Test,” which is if a man in a story can be replaced by a sexy hammer and still tell the same story. Still, the representation of men in comics shouldn’t just boil down to that, as Deconnick said. “Try to make men that men like, but women… also sort of like.”

Between all the jokes and Tarr sarcastically going “Who?” the first time Bendis was mentioned, the most telling moment of the panel was when Jones asked if they were going to talk about favorite male creators in terms of looks or their books. Deconnick paused and told of a Bleeding Cool message board thread that was FMK over women creators. She advised not to go that route, but concluded with, “I’m not bitter, but I have a long memory.”

While the rest of the panel continued from there, with the panelists commenting on how Cameron Stewart and Brenden Fletcher were handsome in different ways along with being good writers and Deconnick making jokes about how Bendis has a big imagination for writing Spider-Woman when he is neither a woman nor a spider, the “I’m not bitter, but I have a long memory” comment stuck with me the most. I feel like that is something that could have easily been said by any of the women on the panel or in attendance. For all the jokes cracked and sarcastic comments made, it was all rooted in the reality of a community that still treats women as a sideshow attraction instead of as serious creators and characters.

Still, for a Monday morning at the end of a five day long convention, it felt good to laugh at the absurdity of it all.

For more quotes from the panel, my livetweet thread can be read here as well as in the #MenInComics hashtag.

HeroesCon Proves Good Comic Shows Don’t Have To Be Hard to Find

“Hello neighbors,” I say to the circle I’m standing in the middle of.

“Hello neighbor,” the circle intones back happily, including Bitch Planet co-creator Kelly Sue Deconnick, who is running this panel. This is just one of the games she’s taught us. The same games she teaches her Girl Scout troop to teach them how to set boundaries and learn about their community.

“I love all of my neighbors, but especially the ones who watch professional wrestling,” I say to the circle. I cover it professionally. I wanted to see if someone was at least interested.

Silence. No one gets up.

“Just me? Okay.”

I change my prompt to those who like combat boots and we scramble to find chairs, leaving someone else in the center to greet their neighbors. I’m not salty though. It’s not long before I’m talking to someone else about pro-wrestling at the end of the panel. It’s HeroesCon after all. Most of us are just neighbors who haven’t met yet.

HeroesCon is an annual comic book convention in Charlotte. Every Father’s Day weekend, comics creators and fans from all around the country descend upon the Queen City to mingle and to sell books and art. It was started by Shelton Drum, the owner of the local shop Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find, but the con has extended beyond the reach of the shop. Especially 35 years on.

I went to my first one in 2014 on a whirlwind day trip from Atlanta to Charlotte, determined to meet my newfound comics heroes Deconnick, Matt Fraction, and Chip Zdarsky. Three years later, I’m still making friends and greeting friends every time I walk the floor, and that’s honestly part of the charm of HeroesCon.

The con is unique in this day of entertainment industry powered comic cons, where comics often take a back seat to television and movies. HeroesCon is comics and comic creator focused, still even after 35 years. The local CW affiliate sets up a booth where they give prizes away relating to the DC Comics TV shows on the network, but that’s about as far as the TV involvement goes. Walk a little further, and you’re bound to find some of your favorite creators sitting at tables, selling their books and art. Or maybe even your future favorite creator. That same con three years prior? That was the first con I met Babs Tarr, excited to see the Bosozoku Sailor Scouts art in person. This year, she was selling exclusive trades of Motor Crush that could only be found at the convention, with Domino and Lola blasting past Heroes Aren’t Hard to Find. It’s hard not to feel proud.

The games panel is different from the other panels I was able to make it to during the weekend. The other two were more traditional. Well, as traditional as you can get with Zdarsky talking about going undercover at a skeezy nudist resort as the long way of saying his parents are into Sex Criminals during his spotlight panel and Fraction reading quotes from his supervillain daughter Tallulah Louise during the Milkfed Criminal Masterminds panel (which I livetweeted here).

It feels like only a panel that could work at HeroesCon though. Laid back and concentrated on being open. There is no pressure to participate. It’s not crunched and stressful like Dragon Con and it’s not about promoting the next big property. We’re here to learn about our community. To share in a mutual love.

“I feel welcome in my fandom,” Deconnick asks the room in a game of Across the Room, where we cross to the other side of the room to join a line.

I stay firmly planted for the time. I feel welcome at HeroesCon. It’s not a con of exclusion. They’re here for all fans of comics. But comics fandom? I’m a queer woman. I barely feel welcome. For pro-wrestling? I constantly feel like I’m loitering around a door, screaming at the residents inside, even if I do write about it professionally.

“I want to make people feel welcome in my fandom.”

There, I take the opportunity to aggressively stomp across the room.

“My mom wanted me to give you a hug from her,” I tell Deconnick after the panel. She met my mom at a Bitch Planet signing in Toronto a couple of years ago and asks me about her every time we see each other at a convention. We exchange hugs and she ‘awws’ about my mom.

It’s one of those things I wish I could tell me of three years ago about, nervous about meeting her idols. It’s also one of those things I feel grateful to HeroesCon for. Helping break down barriers and anxieties to help me figure out my career.

Every year I’ve gone, it’s expanded a little more, but it still feels like a family reunion. It’s the con I look forward to the most every year just because I get to see my comics friends without the added extra stress of packing five days worth of cosplay or having to time running across five hotels to make it to a panel in a basement. It drains my wallet with good art and good food, but it’s welcome. Where else can Kris Anka make jokes about having to fix Joe Quinones’ art when I come to pick up a commission of Captain Marvel? Or the press liaison that I have not previously met recognizes me and thanks me for tweeting while he goes to attend to delivering extra books to creators from the shop?

HeroesCon is special in those ways. It’s not about the big press push, but reminding the world that comics and the people who make them can be pretty great. And that everyone can and should be welcome in their fandoms, despite whatever state laws exist in North Carolina or in the patriarchal confines of old fandom structures.

Review: Barbarella OGN

I remember the first time I watched a B-movie, was with my cousins and two of my uncles. One of my uncles kept telling us that the best movies were made in the 1970s. To our pubescent ears, it probably sounds just how prehistoric life was when anybody who watches The Goldbergs or Fresh Off the Boat, as we could not believe hem at the time. Then my uncle brought A VHS tape of the Big Bird Cage starring Pam Grier.

My whole world changed, as I instantly fell in love with this world. When we used to go to the video store, I looked for these movies, in fact, any movie from the 1970s. Granted, there was a lot of crap out there, but there were also a few gems. One of those movies was Barbarella, starring Jane Fonda, as a hypersexualized space traveler, which not only had all the genre tropes but what anime fans, have come to call, provide “fan service”.

So, when I found out it was originally a comic, I wanted to read it, but unfortunately, it was in French, and although I could understand for the most part what was going on, the snide remarks and smart discourse the movie had, was literally lost in translation. Years later when Humanoids acquired the title and had Kelly Sue DeConnick adapt it and translate it. The work not only stands the test of time, it soars. The stories contained in this collection, are more than space exploration stories, they are the campy movies from the 70s I grew up on. By the end of this volume, the reader is reminded of the movie, but also finds out how much they have missed by only watching the movie.

Overall, a fun trip down the nostalgia hole that is B-movie fun. The stories by Jean-Claude Forrest, are just as exciting and amusing, as one could have imagined. The art by Forrest has that crude 70s style that most artists of the time copied, but his characters and backgrounds still jump off the page. Altogether, in a time where political correctness was not as fervently checked, this book is a time capsule when your imagination was the only ticket you need to explore these worlds.

Story: Jean-Claude Forrest Adaptation: Kelly Sue DeConnick Art: Jean-Claude Forrest
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Image Announces a Slew of Creators for the Rose City Comic Con Homecoming Dance

Fan-favorite Image Comics creators Chip Zdarsky, Babs Tarr, Matt Fraction, and Kelly Sue DeConnick have all RSVP’d to participate in the Image Comics’ Fall Homecoming dance! Don’t miss your chance to rub elbows with your favorite comics creators and celebrate Image Comics’ 25th anniversary with dancing, refreshments, and a photobooth.

Tickets to the Image Comics Fall Homecoming Dance are on sale now.

Back by popular demand, Image Comics is pleased to host a very special formal Fall Homecoming dance for the comics community during the Rose City Comic Con festivities. The dance will be held on Saturday, September 9th from 8:30 p.m. – 12:30 a.m. at The Evergreen. This event will be 21+ only. IDs will be checked at the door.

Image Comics’ Fall Homecoming will be in the style and spirit of a traditional high school dance and all comics fans and industry members are encouraged to come mix, mingle, and dance the night away.

Image Comics Fall Homecoming ticket tiers:

  • $20: Entry ticket
  • $45: Add-on pack, including an Image t-shirt, variant cover comic, commemorative pint glass, and enamel pin
  • $79: VIP pack—ticket to the party, add-on pack items, and access to special VIP area at the venue (limited quantity, only 100 VIP tickets available)

Around the Tubes

It’s a new week! We’ve got interviews, a brand new episode of Graphic Policy Radio tonight, reviews, and more lined up!

While you await all of that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Gizmodo – Famed Comic Book Artist Bernie Wrightson Dies at 68 – Out thoughts are with his friends and family.

Kotaku – Scumbags Harass Woman For Working On Mass Effect: Andromeda’s Animations – Weird how it’s always the women this happens to… utter scum doing this.

Pacific Standard – Kelly Sue DeConnick Is Building a Future for Women in Comic Books – And being awesome while doing it.

Comics Alliance – ‘Flash’ Bosses Promise No Speedster Villain in Season 4 – The Rogues… please?

ICv2 – Marvel Planning Retailer Summit – Interesting move.

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: About a Bull brings Irish myth to life – Free comics. Go read!!!

The Beat – A year of free comics – Mickey Zacchilli’s Space Academy 123 – More free comics. Go read!!!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

The Beat – Coady and the Creepies #1

Talking Comics – Trinity #7

 

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