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Get a first look at Star Wars: The Mandalorian #1

The saga of the Mandalorian comes to Marvel! Kicking off in July, Star Wars: The Mandalorian will be an eight-issue adaptation of the Disney+ series’ first season, giving fans a chance to relive the events and characters of Season 1 through the lens of writer Rodney Barnes and artist Georges Jeanty! From the thrilling introduction of Mandalorian bounty hunter Din Djarin to his unforgettable first encounter with the Child, these iconic Star Wars moments will be brought to life in a brand-new way, and you can get your first look at the highly-anticipated debut issue right now in a special preview!

Star Wars: The Mandalorian #1 features inks by Karl Story and colors by Rachelle Rosenberg. The main cover is by Adi Granov with variants by John Tyler Christopher, Declan Shalvey, David Aja, Leinil Francis Yu, Phil Jimenez, Nick Gindaux, and a “tv variant” cover.

Check out all the covers right now and pick it up when it hits stands on July 6.

Review: U.S.Agent #2

U.S.Agent #2

While I can see what writer Priest is going for in his take on the controversial character U.S.Agent, the series in two issues has been a mixed result. There’s concepts within that are great but there’s far too many distractions. The result has been a choppy narrative that at times doesn’t quite make sense. U.S.Agent #2 continues the frustrating series that has me longing to read other works of Priest.

U.S.Agent #2 feels like it’s serving a few too many bosses. Priest takes us to the past and back again. The second issue fleshes out John Walker’s past while also trying to deliver some sort of conflict in the present.

John Walker is an interesting character. He’s the conservative “Captain America” driven my “Red State” ideals and that includes wearing his racism and bigotry on his sleeve. But, he does stand to fight for America and what he believes. He’s the bigot that’s right part of the time, as long as your “right” is a basic understanding of American ideals.

This miniseries has attempted to flesh out Walker’s history introducing us to his sister and giving us more of his trauma. We can see the beginnings of a troubled human being and with that some sympathy. Just some. He’s truly a horrible human being. And that’s part of the issue with the series and character. There’d be a great juxtaposition in having us cheering on his justified mission but at the same time questioning his other beliefs and him as a person. He’d be a horrible person doing what’s right. But, the series is taking too long to set that out. We’re getting too much of a character to dislike and that’s about it.

There’s also issues with how the issue is generally presented. The art by Georges Jeanty is nice and improved over the first issue. But, there’s not enough definition between the past and present making it confusing at times to determine what scenes take place and when. Joined by Karl Story on ink, Matt Milla on color, and lettering by Joe Sabino, the comic is fine to look at. There’s some really solid moments. But, the art doesn’t quite hook the reader enough to justify the sub-par story. There are some details that are great to the story visually. The use of confessionals, U.S.Agent being greated by the town, these stand out. The art fits more of the comedic tone of the series but the series doesn’t quite know if it wants to be a comedy or something else.

U.S.Agent #2, like the first issue, is a bit of a letdown. The creative team is top-notch and it might be high expectations that this series feels like a letdown. It’s possible by the end it’ll all come together for something greater than its individual parts. But, it hasn’t gotten to that point yet and as individual issues, the series has been rough. There’s so much better from the creative team that’s been or being, released, it’s better to spend your time reading those instead.

Story: Priest Art: Georges Jeanty
Ink: Karl Story Color: Matt Milla Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 5.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Review: U.S.Agent #1

U.S.Agent #1

U.S. Agent has always been a bit too much of a B-lister for me to care much about. I do feel he worked best as a haywire version of Captain America, one not afraid to get his hands too bloody to save the day. I’m also a bit of a fan of Christopher Priest from his Quantum & Woody stuff and his more recent Deathstroke work. So, I wanted to see Priest’s take on the character in U.S.Agent #1.

U.S.Agent #1 is comprised of Priest’s writing style, lots of black box panels to move the reader along. Story-wise, U.S. Agent is holed up in a mining town punching out pizza deliverymen until one comes to his house and hands him a slice of his ass and sends him toppling down the stairs. Then the mystery pizza man hangs out with him and they fly off to fight some bad people.

I wanted to like this but I did not like it much at all. U.S. Agent doesn’t work as some jobber just getting beaten down by randos. Maybe I have not paid enough attention to the character history to know what’s up but this guy was Captain America’s replacement and here he just kinda sucks. And it stink because I like Priest’s work but this just felt like the scrap ideas of a bunch of better books that he’s done. I liked Georges Jeanty’s art a bit more than the writing on this book. Nothing special with the panels but his detail is solid. He deserves a better project than this.

Overall, U. S. Agent seemed quite a bit mediocre and I don’t see the appeal of a weak knock-off going on this kind of adventure. It lacked the humor and action that I expect from a Christopher Priest book. Instead of buying this, go get one of the Deathstroke trade paperbacks because that’s a better use of your money.

Story: Christopher Priest Art: Georges Jeanty
Ink: Karl Story Color: Matt Milla Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 4.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon – Kindle – Zeus Comics

Review: U.S.Agent #1

U.S.Agent #1

There’s a lot I like about U.S.Agent #1. There’s also a lot I struggled with in a mixed debut issue. John Walker is back but he’s no longer an official agent of the government. Instead, he’s a government contractor hired out to do whatever his employer wants. The conflict of this debut revolves around a small town and a conflict with a mega-corporation that has moved in. There’s a lot of potential with just that but with some twists and turns what should be a simple commentary on the state of Middle America turns into a rather muddled and confusing debut.

Written by Christopher Priest, U.S.Agent #1 has a premise that should be easy. It’s themes are an easy layup and its focus should be clear. The concept of a small town having to deal with a mega-corporation destroying their life is something that is well worth discussing. It’s a real-world event that happens over and over and there’s so much material to mine. Instead, Priest mixes in former S.H.I.E.L.D. operation centers, Walker having a partner to tag along, and kidnapping pizza boys!? Yeah, the last part is a bit over the top, even for a character such as Walker.

But, where Priest really drops the ball is Walker himself. The man is beyond bigoted and racist. As depicted, he has absolutely no redeeming qualities. He’s completely unlikeable. I’m given no reason to cheer for him in succeeding or even redeeming himself. He’s a complete asshole and at this point I would love to see him just take a bullet and get it over with.

Georges Jeanty‘s art delivers a little pep to the debut with a style that fits the more comedic tone of the debut. A lot of the art leans on to stereotypes, especially when it comes to the small town. Joined by Karl Story on ink, Matt Milla on color, and Joe Sabino on lettering, the opening few pages features individuals who live in the small town. Each is a bit too similar to each other with the same positioning of their head and even mouth and teeth that look like they’re repeated. I’m not sure if this is done on purpose to make a point or if it’s just the style. But, we’re told they’re small town folk by their hats, clothes, and the slightly dirty look to them all.

But, not all of the art is frustrating. The action has its moments and when the comic wants to play for laughs, Jeanty’s style really fits the moment and the pacing delivered with each panel plays a comedic action comedy beat. If the comic went more in that direction and stuck with it, the art might pull the comic up to a point I’m more excited about it but there’s just too much that doesn’t click in both narrative and visuals.

U.S.Agent #1 feels like it doesn’t know what it wants to be. There’s part of it that’s action/comedy starring a racist. Part of it is a spy/action story… also starring a racist. Then, there are hints there are some psychological things at play and it’s an exploration of John Walker himself. It can be any of those things and if it focused on one of them it might be really good and interesting. As presented, it comes off as a choppy debut that never quite gets its bearing or finds its voice.

Story: Christopher Priest Art: Georges Jeanty
Ink: Karl Story Color: Matt Milla Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.4 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Review: X-Men/Fantastic Four : 4X #1

It’s been foreshadowed for a while but the Fantastic Four and X-Men clash over the future of wellbeing of Franklin Richards.

Story: Chip Zdarsky
Art: Terry Dodson
Ink: Rachel Dodson, Dexter Vines, Karl Story
Color: Laura Martin
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Amazing Spider-Man: Full Circle #1

Seven teams of creators get together and jam on this comic in a round-robin style story. Each team has no idea who the previous are until they get their part and no idea what’s coming. The result? Really entertaining.

Story: Jonathan Hickman, Gerry Duggan, Nick Spencer, Kelly Thompson, Al Ewing, Chip Zdarsky, Jason Aaron
Art: Chris Bachalo, Greg Smallwood, Michael Allred, Valerio Schiti, Chris Sprouse, Rachael Stott, Cameron Stewart, Mark Bagley
Ink: Tim Townsend, Al Vey, Greg Smallwood, Michael Allred, Valerio Schiti, Karl Story, Rachael Stott, Cameron Stewart, John Bell
Color: Chris Bachalo, Greg Smallwood, Laura Allred, Mattia Iacono, Dave McCaig, Triona Farrell, Nathan Fairbairn, Frank D’Armata
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Luke Skywalker #1

Discover an untold story about Luke Skywalker set around Return of the Jedi! Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Luke Skywalker #1 is by:

Story: Greg Pak
Art: Chris Sprouse, Scott Koblish, Stefano Landini
Inks: Karl Story, Marc Deering
Color: Tamra Bonvillain
Letterer: Travis Lanham

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Human Target

Human Target

Sylvester Stallone is one those actors whose exterior offputs a lot of people. His acting talent is truly undervalued.  I gravitated to his star power through the Rocky and Rambo franchises.  Since those, he’s made movies that have been hit or miss. One of my favorites was Cobra, a truly 80s action movie that dripped all the sleek hair, outfits, and overall style that the decade was notorious for.

Another movie of his which as very entertaining was The Specialist. In it he plays a hitman who can’t stay out of the way of Sharon Stone. These roles were the ones that he actually thrived in, a quiet but steady man of strength, one which everyone trusts and no one wants to cross. One of those movies was in the brilliantly executed Avenging Angelo. That film mixed film noir and gangster films into an entertaining blend. In Len Wein’s stark take on Christopher Chance, we get a singular unique story in Human Target.

We find Chance and Winston entertaining a job of protecting a disgraced mobster, Angelo Morelli. He needs to deliver evidence to the Feds before he can be killed. The job becomes more complicated as Morelli has left pieces of evidence which would incriminate his organization all over the world and it’s up to Chance and him to retrieve them all before anyone else finds out about it. This leads him to Paris, Geneva, Hong Kong and everywhere in between, as Morelli’s organization starts to figure out exactly what the two are up to.

Overall, Human Target is an action-packed miniseries which borrows form the source material and the television show generously enough not to forget how fun this character is. The story by Len Wein and Peter Johnson is pulse pounding, smart and well developed. The art by the creative team is awe inspiring. Altogether, a portrait of a man for hire who will stop at nothing to do his job.

Story: Len Wein and Peter Johnson
Art: Simon Coleby, Bruno Redondo, Jason Masters, Chris Sprouse,
and John Paul Leon
Ink: Sergio Cariello, Karl Story, Cliff Rathburn, Jason Masters, John Paul Leon,
and Sergio Sandoval
Story: 10 Art: 9.7 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Infinity Countdown Companion

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got the collected companion to Infinity Countdown.

Infinity Countdown Companion features Infinity Countdown: Black Widow #1, Captain Marvel #1, Daredevil #1, and Champions #1-2 by Jim McCann, Diego Olortegui, Erick Arciniega, Clayton Cowles, Inhyuk Lee, Gerry Duggan, Chris Sprouse, Phil Noto, Lee Ferguson, Scott Hanna, Karl Story, Matt Yackey, Clayton Crain, Jim Zub, Emilio Laiso, Andy Troy, Nik Virella, Brent Schoonover, Cris Peter, and Yasmine Putri.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores on September 18. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Dark Days the Road to Metal

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got the collection that gets you caught up for Metal!

Dark Days the Road to Metal features Dark Days: The Forge #1, Dark Days: The Casting #1, Final Crisis #6-7, Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne #1, Batman #38-39, and Nightwing #17 by Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV, Jim Lee, Andy Kubert, John Romita, Jr., Scott Williams, Klaus Janson, Danny Miki, Alex SInclair, Jeremiah Skipper, Steve Wands, Grant Morrison, Doug Mahnke, J.G. Jones, Carlos Pacheco, Marco Rudy, Christian Alamy, Jesus Merino, Tom Nguyen, Drew Geraci, Norm Rapmund, Rodney Ramos, Walden Wong, Pete Pantazis, Tony Avina, Rob Clark, Jr., Travis Lanham, Chris Sprouse, Karl Story, Guy Major, Jared K. Fletcher, Brad Anderson, Greg Capullo, FCO Placencia, Tim Seeley, Javier Fernandez, Chris Sotomayor, Carlos M. Mangual, Eddy Barrows, Eber Ferreira, Adriano Lucas, Marilyn Patrizia, and Rian Hughes.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores May 22. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

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