Tag Archives: juan romera

Review: Past the Last Mountain #2

Past the Last Mountain #2

What I really enjoy about this site is to be able to read and discover comics I might not otherwise get a chance to. This is a perfect example of that. Past the Last Mountain #2 continues what is one of my favorite discoveries of the year continuing a series that entertains and makes you think.

Written by Paul Allor, Past the Last Mountain #2 continues the story of three escaped fantasy creatures. They’re on the run looking for a mythical land for them to call home. Years ago, a war was fought between the humans and fantasy creatures with the creatures losing and being rounded up to live on reservations. There’s so much to read into the series, you can debate what it’s an allegory to or just sit back and enjoy the adventure.

Allor sticks to tried and true concepts for the series and it’s what makes it work so well. It feels like a Disney film out of the 80s and that’s a good thing. There’s the jaded adults trying to protect the innocent child on the run. In pursuit there’s the evil military but of course there’s one individual who has some doubts about what they’re doing. It’s a formula we’ve seen many times before but it works and works really well.

Louie Joyce is on the art for the main story with layouts by Gannon Beck. The art style is interesting as it has a bit more of a comical look to it. It’s not a heavy fantasy feel at all but it works really well. Where the comic really stands out is the emotions of the trio of monsters. You can feel their sadness and fear as they debate what they should do or think about what they should have done. The look on the dragon’s face when it asks if it did the right thing is heartbreaking. But, it’s also a small detail that adds a solid emotional punch to it all. You gain sympathy for the characters and want them to reach their goal safely.

The comic also features a bunch of short stories from the war, all adding to the history and the world. Written by Allor, they feature art by Sjan Weijers, Caspar Wijngaard, Joe Lalich, Triona Farrell, Juan Romera, Eoin Marron, and Rebecca Nalty. Every entry, like the first issue, is solid. They all add to the world and the story giving us a better idea of what’s going on and how we got to the moment. It’s such a great addition to the main story and a fantastic way to build out the world even more. It’s such a fantastic idea and not only feels like an added “bonus” but each story is so solid on its own. It makes me want another series where we can get even more of this and maybe some longer “short stories”. It shows there’s a lot that can be done with this world and there’s such potential.

Past the Last Mountain #2 continues a series that’s probably not on many people’s radars. And they’d be missing out. It’s a hell of a series so far that feels like a classic journey but with a bit more to say.

Story: Paul Allor
Art: Louie Joyce, Sjan Weijers, Caspar Wijngaard, Joe Lalich, Triona Farrell, Juan Romera, Eoin Marron, Rebecca Nalty
Layouts: Gannon Beck Color: Louie Joyce Letterer: Paul Allor
Story: 8.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

CEX Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology/KindleZeus Comics

Preview: Past the Last Mountain #2 (of 4)

Past the Last Mountain #2 (of 4)

(W) Paul Allor (A) Louie Joyce, Gannon Beck (CA) Louie Joycen, Gannon Beck, Jody Edwards
In Shops: May 11, 2022
SRP: $5.99

The search continues, as the fantasy creatures seek shelter with a kind stranger, and the humans consider drastic actions to bring them back! Plus, short stories illustrated by Caspar Wijingaard, Eion Marron, Sjan Wiejers, Joe Lalich, and Juan Romera!

Past the Last Mountain #2 (of 4)

Review: Past the Last Mountain #2

Past the Last Mountain #2

What I really enjoy about this site is to be able to read and discover comics I might not otherwise get a chance to. This is a perfect example of that. Past the Last Mountain #2 continues what is one of my favorite discoveries of the year continuing a series that entertains and makes you think.

Written by Paul Allor, Past the Last Mountain #2 continues the story of three escaped fantasy creatures. They’re on the run looking for a mythical land for them to call home. Years ago, a war was fought between the humans and fantasy creatures with the creatures losing and being rounded up to live on reservations. There’s so much to read into the series, you can debate what it’s an allegory to or just sit back and enjoy the adventure.

Allor sticks to tried and true concepts for the series and it’s what makes it work so well. It feels like a Disney film out of the 80s and that’s a good thing. There’s the jaded adults trying to protect the innocent child on the run. In pursuit there’s the evil military but of course there’s one individual who has some doubts about what they’re doing. It’s a formula we’ve seen many times before but it works and works really well.

Louie Joyce is on the art for the main story with layouts by Gannon Beck. The art style is interesting as it has a bit more of a comical look to it. It’s not a heavy fantasy feel at all but it works really well. Where the comic really stands out is the emotions of the trio of monsters. You can feel their sadness and fear as they debate what they should do or think about what they should have done. The look on the dragon’s face when it asks if it did the right thing is heartbreaking. But, it’s also a small detail that adds a solid emotional punch to it all. You gain sympathy for the characters and want them to reach their goal safely.

The comic also features a bunch of short stories from the war, all adding to the history and the world. Written by Allor, they feature art by Sjan Weijers, Caspar Wijngaard, Joe Lalich, Triona Farrell, Juan Romera, Eoin Marron, and Rebecca Nalty. Every entry, like the first issue, is solid. They all add to the world and the story giving us a better idea of what’s going on and how we got to the moment. It’s such a great addition to the main story and a fantastic way to build out the world even more. It’s such a fantastic idea and not only feels like an added “bonus” but each story is so solid on its own. It makes me want another series where we can get even more of this and maybe some longer “short stories”. It shows there’s a lot that can be done with this world and there’s such potential.

Past the Last Mountain #2 continues a series that’s probably not on many people’s radars. And they’d be missing out. It’s a hell of a series so far that feels like a classic journey but with a bit more to say.

Story: Paul Allor
Art: Louie Joyce, Sjan Weijers, Caspar Wijngaard, Joe Lalich, Triona Farrell, Juan Romera, Eoin Marron, Rebecca Nalty
Layouts: Gannon Beck Color: Louie Joyce Letterer: Paul Allor
Story: 8.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

CEX Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology/Kindle

Preview: Past the Last Mountain #2 (of 4)

Past the Last Mountain #2 (of 4)

(W) Paul Allor (A) Louie Joyce, Gannon Beck (CA) Louie Joycen, Gannon Beck, Jody Edwards
In Shops: May 11, 2022
SRP: $5.99

The search continues, as the fantasy creatures seek shelter with a kind stranger, and the humans consider drastic actions to bring them back! Plus, short stories illustrated by Caspar Wijingaard, Eion Marron, Sjan Wiejers, Joe Lalich, and Juan Romera!

Past the Last Mountain #2 (of 4)

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle

Review: Nancy Hernandez & The Black Widows Volume 2

Nancy Hernandez & The Black Widows Volume 2

Freddy Krueger is one of those characters that nightmares are truly made of. The Nightmare On Elm Street movies featured the iconic Robert Englund and exactly what my classmates talked about when I was in middle school. No doubt, Englund was scary and his performance was exquisite in how he inhabited the character. His portrayal compared to his contemporary horror villains, Michael Myers and Jason, was far more penetrating.

The one Nightmare On Elm Street film that stayed with me up until now, being the most memorable in all is A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors. The plot revolved around a group of teens at a mental hospital who all have been affected by Freddy.  The fact that each teenager was affected by  Krueger makes the shock even more real. In the second chapter of Nancy Hernandez and The Black Widows, we see almost the same predicament as the Dream Warriors, the Black Widows now know the threat of Nancy’s vengeful spirit. The spirit is taking up vengeance one by one. But what will they do about her?

We meet up with the Black Widows, as they deal with the aftermath of how Face disappeared mysteriously, as they realize they must band together in order to survive. But their luck only gets worse as the spirit picks them off one by one.

Overall, the issue is more than a satisfying end to one of the best horror books to come out in a while. The story by Scott Marcano is entertaining, well developed, and heartfelt. The art by Juan Romera is gorgeous as this art style serves this story well. Altogether, a story that is both touching and scary, proving these storytellers to be ones to watch.

Story: Scott Marcano Art: Juan Romera
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Nancy Hernandez and the Black Widows Volume 1: The Call to Justice

Nancy Hernandez and the Black Widows Volume 1: The Call to Justice

I remember the first time I watched a horror movie. It was Clive Barker’s Hellraiser. I had no idea what I was getting into. It was twisted, gory, and just as fascinating. Needless to say, I went on to watch other horror movies, including the now famous 80s horror icons Michael Myers, Freddie Krueger, and Jason. Each of these movies would raise a generation of moviegoers who would take things a step further.

The films that really got me were the ones took place in high school like Carrie and Class of 1999, which was a cool hybrid between horror and science fiction. As they captured the sometimes terror of being in high school with the heightened element of horror. In the first volume of Nancy Hernandez And The Black Widows: The Call For Justice, a group of mean girls gets their just due in the worst ways possible.

We meet Nancy Hernandez as a young child. She’s a devout Catholic, even talking to God in the first few panels. She also just moved to South Central. We also meet Shorty, a tatted-up girl who has nothing but attitude for anyone that looks in her direction. There’s also her crew, the Black Widows, which consist of  Ratita, Face, Pollita, Tattletale, Dulce, and Roach. They’re a bunch of mean girls, who pretty much like being hostile. This is where Nancy meets the Black Widows, who make her life a living hell, the very first day, as they take her Walkman, and she tells on them during an initiation for one of their new members, Dulce.

Of course, the Black Widows will not let this stand. They wait for the perfect opportunity to pounce. As Nancy leaves Lacrosse practice early she’s confronted by the gang. They want to teach her a lesson but they go too far and kill Nancy by accident.

As her teachers and her family mourn her death, the Black Widows panic as their fates is tied as to whether anyone finds out the truth about Nancy’s death. As the detective on the case and the school security team up to find out happened to Nancy, spooky things start to happen all throughout the school. Nancy’s ghost seeks vengeance.

Overall, an engrossing book that starts out like your typical school story but becomes something even more, as Michael Myers wished he was as frightening as Nancy Hernandez. The story by Scott Marcano and Jaime Zevallos is a love letter to 80s horror movies. It more than elevates the genre. The art by Juan Romera is simply gorgeous. Altogether, an elixir of fright, teen angst, and revenge.

Story: Scott” Diablo” Marcano and Jaime Zevallos Art: Juan Romera
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

A Wave Blue World offers Free Comics to Supporters of Mark Waid’s Legal Fund

A Wave Blue World (AWBW), publisher of anthologies such as Broken Frontier, All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World, and the upcoming Death of the Horror Anthology, announces they will send free digital copies of This Nightmare Kills Fascists and a special color version of the All We Ever Wanted ashcan edition to anyone who donates $15USD or more to Mark Waid‘s legal fundraiser.

The longstanding comic book pro is currently being sued by one of the perceived leaders of the online harassment movement called ‘ComicsGate’. To fund his defense against the suit, Waid has launched a crowdfunding appeal on Go Fund Me.

Curated and edited by Matt Miner (GWAR, Poser) and Eric Palicki (No Angel, Atlantis Wasn’t Built For Tourists), This Nightmare Kills Fascists is a horror anthology in the style of Creepy and Eerie, told against the backdrop of modern politics.  It boasts stories from a plethora of hot creators including Vita Ayala, Tini Howard, Justin Jordan, Ariela Kristantina, Ryan Ferrier, and many, many more.

All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World is an upcoming anthology spearheaded by the same editorial team plus AWBW publisher Tyler Chin-Tanner that looks into a more hopeful and positive future, and has been described as “less Mad Max, more Star Trek.”  Currently available to order in the October issue of Previews, the anthology is set to hit stores in December.

The print version of the ashcan was an exclusive for NYCC ‘18, but can now be obtained digitally only by those who support this fund. It contains three of the stories from the anthology by creators Robbi Rodriguez, Tyler Chin-Tanner, Paul Allor, Juan Romera, Eric Palicki, and Eryk Donovan.

AWBW publisher Tyler Chin-Tanner said in the release:

Over his entire career, Mark Waid has always been a champion for creators’ rights and now he’s standing up for them against bullying and harassment. It’s important for us to come together now as a comics community to support him.

Comic creator Matt Miner added:

If our fascist-smashing anthology can help Mark Waid fight against actual fascists in comics then I’m all for it. I stand with my LGBT family and trans friends in denouncing comicsgate and all the hate that they spew.

Comic creator Eric Palicki also said:

I don’t know Mark personally, but I’ve followed his work for as long as I’ve been reading comics. It’s no surprise a writer who understands Superman or Daredevil so profoundly would devote so much of himself to standing up to real-life bullies, and I’m proud to help Mark in any way I can.

To obtain the PDFs for This Nightmare Kills Fascists and the All We Ever Wanted ashcan, please send a screenshot of your receipt of your donation of $15USD or more to Mark Waid’s fundraiser to tyler@awbw.com.

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