Tag Archives: john dell

Review: The Superior Spider-Man The Complete Collection Vol. 2

Out now is The Superior Spider-Man The Complete Collection Vol. 2 which collects issues #17-31 and Annual #1-2, the adventures of Doc Ock in the body of Peter Parker!

The Superior Spider-Man The Complete Collection Vol. 2 is by Dan Slott, Ryan Stegman, Livesay, Edgar Delgado, Chris Eliopoulos, Jason Howard, Humberto Ramons, Javier Rodriguez, Marcos Martin, Victor Olazaba, Alvaro Lopez, Giuseppe Camuncoli, John Dell, Antonio Fabela, Terry Pallot, Alvaro Lopez, J.G. Jones, Laura Martin, Christos Gage, Will Sliney, Philip Briones, Clayton Cowles, Mike Del Mundo, Ellie Pule, Stephen Wacker, and Nick Lowe.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Venomized #4

Venomized #4

Story: Cullen Bunn
Art: Kevin Libranda
Ink: Scott Hanna, Livesay
Color: Matt Yackey
Letterer: VC’s Joe Caramagna
Cover: Nick Bradshaw, Jim Campbell
Variant Cover: Mike Deodato, Jr., Marcel Maiolo
Connecting Variant Cover: Mark Bagley, John Dell, Paul Mount
Title Page Design: Idette Winecoor
Executive Editor: Nick Lowe
Editor: Devin Lewis
Assistant Editor: Tom Groneman
Rated T+
In Shops: Apr 25, 2018
SRP: $3.99

VENOMIZED Part 4
• The battle rages between Earth’s VENOMIZED defenders and the POISON invaders, bent on consuming all symbiotes – and life itself – in our universe!
• The X-Men think they have a new ally in the fight, one that could turn the tide!
• VENOM and Earth’s heroes gamble on a risky counterattack to end things…for better or worse!

Review: Spider-Men II

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Spider-Men!

Spider-Men II features issues #1-5 by Brian Michael Bendis, Sara Pichelli, Mark Bagley, John Dell, Elisabetta D’Amico, Justin Ponsor, Chris Eliopoulos, Cory Petit, Kathleen Wisneski, Devin Lewis, and Nick Lowe.

Get your copy in comic shops today and in book stores April 3. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFW

 

Marvel​ provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Marvel Two-in-One #1

In Marvel Two-in-One #1, writer Chip Zdarsky, penciler Jim Cheung, inkers John Dell and Walden Wong, and colorist Frank Martin break every emotional bone in your Fantastic Four loving body. A comic co-starring the Human Torch was the last place that I expected to see an homage to the opening scene of The Dark Knight Returns where an aging, alcoholic Bruce Wayne tries to find a “good death” by crashing a very expensive stock car. However, Zdarsky, Cheung, and company pull it off complete with a nine panel grid, downcast eyes, and red and blacks from Martin that look like a funeral pyre. And Marvel Two-in-One has a quite wistful tone throughout the issue as Johnny Storm and Ben Grimm come to terms with their grief for the missing Richards family as well as the adventures they once had.

From his work on Jughead Howard the Duck, and of course, Sex Criminals, Chip Zdarsky does funny very well, and that shows in Marvel Two-in-One with the Thing’s deadpan one-liners (Apparently, he was just the Fantastic Four’s “bus driver”.) and a hilarious meta-joke featuring all the actors who have played the Human Torch. But he mainly goes for pathos in this comic, which is helped by the range of expression in Jim Cheung’s pencils and the detailed added in by veteran inkers John Dell and Walden Wong. For example, there is a two page almost silent sequence where the Thing visits a warehouse with all the FF’s stuff, including the Fantasticar, and remembers his family and their last adventure in blue tinged flashbacks. The first half of the comic is almost overwhelming for him with reminders of Reed and Sue everywhere and call from beyond the grave for him to watch after Johnny, who is suffering from both grief and the possible loss of his powers.

Also, the Thing and Human Torch don’t really team up in Marvel Two-in-One #1, which is perfectly fine. We do get a nice nod to the original Two-in-One series when the Thing lays out a villain in one panel that would probably have taken Spider-Man an entire issue or two to defeat depending on decompression. Zdarsky and Cheung have the two emotionally charged brothers physically and verbally butt heads before finally confiding in each other and finding a shared goal in exploring the multiverse using a very cool Reed Richards doodad. Martin turns on the flames before cooling down and going for simple muted colors as they start to talk and trust in each other again. Since the original Jack Kirby and Stan Lee Fantastic Four run, Johnny and Ben have butted heads with the Thing being jealous of Human Torch’s good looks and popularity while he is treated like a monster. However, they are family even if Zdarsky sneaks in a dark end-of-comic twist to get them to team up. It’s so dark that it makes presumably reformed supervillain Dr. Doom shudder.

In Marvel Two-in-One #1, Chip Zdarsky, Jim Cheung, John Dell, Walden Wong, and Frank Martin craft a comic that is true to the legacy of Marvel’s First Family and deals with the emotional fallout of their disappearance at the end of Secret Wars. They also set up a rocky course for the Thing and Human Torch to begin their own adventures with Dr. Doom watching from the shadows as he is still a little salty that he is not the one responsible for Reed Richards’ demise. Marvel Two-in-One is the first step of a road story featuring two brothers that butt heads, yet still love each other with plenty of nostalgia and a sliver of hope to boot.

Story: Chip Zdarsky Pencils: Jim Cheung Inks: John Dell with Walden Wong Colors: Frank Martin
Story: 9 Art: 8 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider Vol. 1 Back in the Hood

It’s Tuesday which means comics are hitting book stores all across the world. This week from Marvel is a trade dedicated to Ben Reilly, the clone folks love to hate!

Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider Vol. 1 Back in the Hood collects issues #1-5 and material from Clone Conspiracy: Omega #1 by Peter David, Mark Bagley, John Dell and Jason Keith.

Get your copy at comic at comic shops now and bookstores on October 24. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider Vol. 1 Back in the Hood
Amazon or TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider #1

One of the most controversial characters in comics has returned – and the controversy has only BEGUN! In the aftermath of The Clone Conspiracy, Ben has a new take on life…and he’s not the same Scarlet Spider he was before. Come witness what will be the most talked about comic of the year!

I wasn’t much of a Spider-Man fan growing up only reading issues here and there around events, but I even knew to skip the original Clone Saga so missed the original Ben Reilly stories. That might be the reason why the reveal of Reilly as the big bad in the previous event didn’t really have a big impact for me. Instead, I found an interesting character who could easily have given Norman Osborn a run for his money as a brilliant villain to challenge Peter in the future.

Instead, we get Ben Reilly off on his own thinking he’s a hero and going off on an adventure to prove it. He’s wanted so trying to fly under the radar and that has him asking his rescues for money… which has some potential.

But, what’s odd in writer Peter David‘s take on Reilly is that he’s generally lost his mind. Instead of the smart aleck or quick quips like Peter Parker instead we get Reilly being somewhat mean and talking to phantoms. This isn’t the Jackal we’ve seen for an event, the put together villain who has a big vision for the world and how he’ll save it. Here, he’s broken and has more in common with Deadpool than he does in Spider-Man. It’s a weird take that feels like it diverges from the character we saw just a month ago. And, it’s ok to bring these elements in, but they’re there without much of an explanation. It’s an odd addition that I think is supposed to make the character stand out but instead it feels like it’s out of left field.

The art stands out in some ways with Mark Bagley on pencils, John Dell on inks and Jason Keith handling colors. Joe Carmagna needs a shout-out as the letterer as there’s a lot of dialogue on some of the pages, but he makes it work with the art team. Bagley’s pencils are decent though don’t quite stand out like I usually expect from his art. What I did notice is Keith’s use of greens in the coloring, a color I associate with Spider-Man villains. There’s some interesting stuff there, but it doesn’t quite have the punch and excitement as the main Spider-Man series or even Miles Morales’ run.

The first issue is decent with a vibe in some ways back to the 90s when this character was swinging around. I’m not completely sold on this series but intrigued enough to see where it all goes from here.

Story: Peter David Art: Mark Bagley, John Dell
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.60 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Marvel Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Captain Marvel, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Wolverine

It’s Wednesday which means new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We’ve got three more volumes from Marvel covering a wide range of characters and years.

Captain Marvel Vol. 3: Earth’s Mightiest Hero collecting issues #1-11 from 2014 by Kelly Sue Deconnick, David Lopez, Marcio Takara, Laura Braga, and Lee Loughridge.

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3: Civil War II collect Guardians of the Galaxy (2105) #11-14 and material from Free Comic Book Day 2016 Civil War II #1 by Brian Michael Bendis, Valerio Schiti, Kevin Maguire, Jim Cheung, John Dell, Richard Isanove, and Justin Ponsor.

Wolverine: Prehistory collecting Wolverine (2003) #32, Logan: Path of the Warlord, Shadow Society, Wolverine: Agent of Atlas #1-3, First X-Men #1-5, Wolverine: Hunger, Wolverine (1988) #1, Before the Fantastic Four: Ben Grimm & Logan #1-3, Wolverine/Cable, Material from Marvel Comics Presents (1988) #93-98, Wolverine: The Amazing Immortal Man & Other Blood Tales, and Wolverine (2010) #1000 by various writers and artists.

Find out what each trade has in store and whether you should grab yourself a copy. You can find all three in comic stores February 15 and bookstores February 28.

Get your copies now. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Captain Marvel Vol. 3: Earth’s Mightiest Hero
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3: Civil War II
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Wolverine: Prehistory
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: Civil War II #8

civil_war_ii__8Ulysses’ precognitive powers grow stronger with each passing moment. As they reach their peak, what horrors from the future will be unleashed? And seeds sown here will bear bitter fruit for the Marvel Universe of tomorrow. Protect the future or change the future?

It all gets decided here!

After a bit of a delay, Marvel‘s latest event wraps up in Civil War II #8 launching the publisher’s line in another direction. Written by Brian Michael Bendis the comic ends in pretty much the exact way I expected.

Driven mostly by action and relying on David Marquez‘s art to make it interesting, the issue continues the battle between Captain Marvel and Iron Man over the nation’s capitol. Full of flash, the issue isn’t too deep as has plagued the series, and frustratingly shows what could have been with a different direction in script.

The issue is mostly battle, but that battle is broken up with a flash of possible Marvel futures which is something we’ve seen done before in previous events. We get flashes of what’s to come, or may come, each drawn by the different artists below. It’s a tease and a way to sell comics attempting to get fans excited and stick around. It didn’t work before, and I don’t expect it’ll work now as a tactic, but that’s a discussion for another time.

But, lets focus on what could have been.

After the battle between Carol and Tony there’s a coda of sorts giving us the fate of Tony (which you can figure out through the various Marvel NOW! series that have already launched negating a major point of the issue) as Carol discusses his status with Beast. There, the philosophy and moral and philosophical quandary we were promised in the beginning is actually discussed. For a story that had such an interesting premise, precognition preventing crime, it relied on shock deaths and fighting never really dipping too deep into the meat of the discussion. And that’s why I describe the event as a whole as paper thin. But, for a few pages and a dozen or so panels we get an interesting discussion of why Tony did what he did in fighting Carol. It’s an epilogue of sorts that attempts to add some depth to a comic filled with fight scenes.

Marquez’s art is on point as usual. The fight is dramatic and use of panels is really impressive in how scenes are broken up and reactions are thrown in there that way. There is an issue in seeing how much damage Carol is doing to Tony and at some points I think it’s more than a later panel shows, but the dramatic effect is there. Other artists provide glimpses into possible futures and it’s generally good. A little jarring since it wasn’t expected but it doesn’t kill the flow at all.

The comic wraps up the event, resolves the issue of having someone like Ulysses around, and actually makes a case for the idea that the series is supposed to be about. It’s a paint by numbers Marvel event in the end where the final issue’s goal is to wrap things up quickly so we can sell whatever comes next. It’s not as overt as previous events, but it’s a noticeable pattern at this point.

The event wraps up as I expected, a summer blockbuster film with little to challenge the reader relying on flash and shock instead of its cerebral promise.

Story: Brian Michael Bendis Art: David Marquez, Adam Kubert, Leinil Francis Yu, Daniel Acuña, Alan Davis, Mark Farmer, Marco Rudy, Mark Bagley, John Dell, Esad Ribic
Story: 6 Art: 8 Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Clone Conspiracy #3

the_clone_conspiracy__3The Clone Conspiracy continues as Spider-Man is on the run with Gwen Stacy/Spider-Gwen from his newly resurrected rogues. But, the bigger thing about the issue is the ending reveal which while I’m sure will be shocking for some, feels pretty obvious based on the story and its title.

So far The Clone Conspiracy‘s first two issues and its tie-ins have mostly been building up what’s to come and “the big reveal” which happens here. For those that don’t know the main story, the Jackal is bringing back dead individuals from Spider-Man’s past through cloning, but with a twist these individuals are back from the moment of their death including their memories.

So, Spider-Mans rogues, as well as other individuals from his world, are back as if no time has passed at all. It’s an interesting concept and a way to get some of the classic back with Spider-Man. And for the most part the storyline has been a fun ride in a turn your brain off sort of way. Sit back and just enjoy it. Just don’t think too much about it and the implications of it all.

Up to this point the Jackal has talked about how his reasons have been altruistic. These aren’t villains back to plunder, they are here to do good and have been acting in a restrained manner. That part is the most interesting to me as I’m still not convinced the Jackal has a positive bent when it comes to it all. Here we get a better sense of his plan, but things are still very open in many ways.

And there is a big reveal at the end. I’m not going to discuss that here in this review. It’s easy to figure out though (at least I predicted something of the sort in many ways). Writer Dan Slott is mining classic characters and stories and this reveal is an example of that (good or bad). So while it was a “big” moment I found myself generally just nodding, saying “huh,” and then moving on to the next comic to read.

The art by Jim Cheung is fantastic. There’s lots of action, lots of characters, and every single panel on every single page looks amazing. Inks by John Dell and colors by Justin Ponsor all come together for a visual feast. Slott has had some solid writing when it comes to Spider-Man, but the artists he’s gotten to work with are some of the best and this issue is an example. Things pop and look great adding to the fun sense of it all.

The reveal didn’t do a whole lot for me, but the issue is entertaining fun. Events don’t always have to shake things up or make us say “holy shit,” sometimes they can be mindless summer blockbusters that feel more like a ride to strap ourselves in to. The Clone Conspiracy to me is exactly that and I’ve been enjoying the ride and looking forward to see where it takes us.

Story: Dan Slott Art: Jim Cheung Cover Art: Gabriele Dell’Otto
Inks: John Dell Colors: Justin Ponsor
Story: 7.4 Art: 8.15 Overall: 7.45 Recommendation: Read

The Inkwell Awards Showcases its 2015 Joe Sinnott Inking Challenge Art And Fundraiser

The Inkwell Awards, a non-profit organization devoted to the art of inking, will be revealing the unique results of its fifth annual Joe Sinnott Inking Challenge in a series of fund-raising online auctions beginning Saturday, April 11. This is the ‘main event’ to the recently announced Sinnott Spring Celebration of auctions running from March through May containing Joe Sinnott donations.

To best exhibit what inkers do, industry legend Joe Sinnott pencilled a drawing of Marvel’s Amazing Spider-Man, as well as a “breakdown”, or rough sketch, of its most popular X-Man, Wolverine. His art was scanned and sent in blue-line form to various inkers around the globe. The ink artists were invited to embellish the Silver Age great, whether staying faithful to his original lines or reinterpreting them. All resulted in unique pieces of comic art.. Most also sport a classic, hand-lettered logo to resemble a cover.

The list of ink artists contributing their skills is the longest ever and includes: Andy Smith, Dan Parsons, Mark Pennington, Jack Purcell, John Dell, Keith Williams, Mark McKenna, Neil Vokes, Bob Wiacek and many other professionals as well as eager and skilled amateurs. (The list changes each year.)

All submitted art, from last year’s to the current pieces, can be viewed at The Inkwell’s ComicArtFans gallery. All pieces for this challenge are personally signed by the generous Mr. Sinnott and include a certificate of authenticity. The first wave of inked blue-line original art from this Challenge will be on the auction block beginning Saturday, April 11 at the Inkwells’ eBay store. Subsequent waves will begin each week thereafter. The art will later be collected into book form.

The Inkwell Awards also offers Sinnott Inking Challenge book collections of previous art with various editions available for donations to the organization. Prices and availability of these and other merchandise can be found at the Inkwells’ Web Store.

The Inkwell Awards is an official 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to educate and promote the art form of comic-book inking, as well as annually recognize and award the best ink artists and their work. Now in its seventh year, the organization is overseen by a committee of industry professionals and assisted by various professional ambassadors and numerous contributors. They sponsor the Dave Simons Inkwell Memorial Scholarship Fund for the Kubert School and host the Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame Award.

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