Tag Archives: joelle jones

Preview: You Have Killed Me, Softcover Edition

You Have Killed Me, Softcover Edition

(W) Jamie S. Rich
(A/C/CA) Joëlle Jones
Age Rating: Mature Audiences
Genre: Crime/Mystery
Price: $15.99
Page Count: 192

The classic graphic novel collaboration from the minds behind Lady Killer returns in a new softcover format! Antonio Mercer is a private eye by trade, a man bad luck seems to follow, as evidenced by his newest client—the sister of his former lover, Julie Roman, who’s now disappeared. And Julie’s sister, Jessica, is a real piece of work. Still, Mercer takes the case, getting entangled in the same family drama that drove him away. Well, maybe not exactly the same, because the Romans have made some… unsavory connections. As the bodies start piling up, Mercer has no choice but to see the case through to its end—or become one of its casualties.

Preview: Batman #40

Batman #40

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Joëlle Jones
In Shops: Feb 07, 2018
SRP: $2.99

“SUPERFRIENDS” part four! Since the beginning, the friendship between Batman and Wonder Woman has stood at the heart of the DC Universe. Now that friendship is coming apart, and as it does, the universe itself begins to crumble. The conclusion of Batman’s team-up with Wonder Woman. (This story was previously slated to run in BATMAN #39.)

DC Collectibles Announces PVC Statue Line and More for August 2018

DC Collectibles is kicking off the New Year in a big way by revealing a fresh new slate featuring two unique statue lines. Taking center stage in August 2018 will be a first-ever PVC statue line from DC Collectibles titled DC Core. The line will present striking new interpretations of fan-favorite DC characters and will be offered at an attractive $50.00 price point. DC Collectibles will also release an inventive multi-part statue set that showcases the Teen Titans characters as seen in the famous New Teen Titans #1 cover by legendary artist George Pérez. Additional DC Collectibles items debuting in August 2018 include a Designer Series Batman mini statue by Brian Bolland, a Batman: The Animated Series Harley Quinn expressions pack and a DC Cover Girls: Batgirl statue based on the artwork of superstar artist Joëlle Jones.

Charting into new territory, DC Core is DC Collectibles’ first line of 9″ scale statues produced in PVC. The character designs and attitudes are conjured up by DC Collectibles’ executive creative director Jim Fletcher and his award-winning design team, and will feature dazzling, dynamic poses. Each figure will stand upon a character-specific base that will include the same intricate details as the statue itself.

The Joker is the first DC character to be transformed into a DC Core statue, and the spectacular sculpt by David Pereira features the Clown Prince of Crime holding his prized Joker cane on top of his equally iconic “HAHAHA”-themed base. The Joker statue hits stores August 2018 and will be followed by Batman, Batgirl and Wonder Woman statues later this year.

DC Collectibles will also release the first two characters from the company’s 6″ scale New Teen Titans multi-part statue set. The set stars the entire superhero team featured in George Pérez’s popular New Teen Titans #1 cover—Starfire, Robin, Beast Boy, Cyborg, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl and Raven—and the versatile bases allow fans to become their own storytellers. Fans can display one or a few of their favorite characters independently, or for those wanting to own the whole set, the bases fit perfectly together to recreate the iconic Pérez cover image. Each sold separately, Starfire and Robin are the first characters to hit shelves in August. The remaining characters will be released at separate times throughout the year.

See below for the list of DC Collectibles items debuting in August 2018 and beyond!

DC Core PVC Statues

  • Size: 1:8/9″ scale
  • MSRP: $50.00 (Each sold separately)
  • Characters
    • The Joker (On sale August 2018)
    • Batman (On sale September 2018)
    • Batgirl (On sale November 2018)
    • Wonder Woman (On sale November 2018)

The New Teen Titans Multi-Part Statue Set

  • Size: 1:12/6″ scale
  • MSRP: $80.00 (Each sold separately)
  • Based on the artwork by George Pérez
  • Sculpted by Joe Menna
  • Characters
    • Starfire (On sale August 2018)
    • Robin (On sale August 2018)
    • Beast Boy (On sale September 2018)
    • Cyborg (On sale September 2018)
    • Kid Flash (On sale October 2018)
    • Wonder Girl (On sale October 2018)
    • Raven (On sale November 2018)

Batman: The Animated Series: Harley Quinn Expressions Pack

  • Size: 1:12/6″ scale
  • MSRP: $50.00
  • On sale August 2018
  • Accessories include: eight different expressions, two hyenas, multiple pieces of weaponry, roller skates, a fish head costume and a deluxe base

DC Cover Girls: Batgirl by Joëlle Jones Statue

  • Size: 1:8/9″ scale
  • MSRP: $125.00
  • Designed by Joëlle Jones
  • Sculpted by Jack Mathews
  • On sale August 2018

Designer Series: Batman by Brian Bolland Mini Statue

  • Size: 1:10/7″ Scale
  • Based on the artwork from Brian Bolland’s Eisner Award-winning BATMAN: THE KILLING JOKE
  • Sculpted by David Giraud
  • MSRP: $80.00
  • On sale August 2018

Review: Batman #39

Batman and Wonder Woman fight together in an epic battle that will define and then redefine their relationship. What bonds these two pillars of the DCU together? What tears them apart? Find out as Batman continues on his quest for the one thing he’s never had, happiness.

The last two issues of Batman have focused on the relationship between Batman and Superman and the important women in their lives, Catwoman and Lois Lane. Writer Tom King shifts focus to another member of DC’s Trinity, Wonder Woman in a follow up story that pairs her with Batman. And, much like the last two-part story, it also involves relationships.

Batman and Wonder Woman must team up to give a warrior a day off and defend Earth from ravenous hordes. There’s lots of jokes made at Batman’s expense and it’s an interesting concept. What if you were trapped in a place for what seems like decades with an individual? What attractions might happen? Batman faces that test here, which is one of the problems with the issue.

Unlike the previous two issues, this one falls flat in that it reduces Wonder Woman to her attraction in a way. It basically says Batman and Wonder Woman can’t work side by side no matter the time frame, a relationship must form. Or, we’re at least teased this at the end. But, if it goes where that last panel hints, it also sets up Batman as weak when it comes to his emotions, something he’s shown to have control of time and time again. There’s also Wonder Woman’s dialogue which comes off as stilted. Writer Tom King attempts to show her foreign roots but it’s not something we see in other takes on her currently, so it comes off as just odd.

The art by Joëlle Jones is entertaining delivering a mix of action with the quieter moments of Catwoman and her guest exploring Earth. Batman’s design as a warrior is interesting and there’s some good jokes at his expense there. It’s a style that looks familiar in some ways to other iterations that mix his regular costume and armor.

The last two issues have been some of the best of Tom King’s run but this issue falls flat with weird dialogue and an odd take on Bruce Wayne and Wonder Woman. This is an attempt to continue the focus on Batman’s relationship with other heroes as well as with Selina Kyle but what’s presented is just bumpy. There’s some solid stuff there, especially Selina’s aspect of the story, but the rest is off. Maybe the next part will save this one, but what’s presented just doesn’t work.

Story: Tom King Art: Joëlle Jones Cover Art: Mikel Janin
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.65 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Batman #39

Batman #39

(W) Tom King (A) Joëlle Jones (CA) Mikel Janin
RATED T
In Shops: Jan 17, 2018
SRP: $2.99

“SUPERFRIENDS” part three! Batman and Wonder Woman fight together in an epic battle that will define and then redefine their relationship. What bonds these two pillars of the DCU together? What tears them apart? Find out as Batman continues on his quest for the one thing he’s never had, happiness.

Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2017

In 2017, I found it increasingly difficult to keep up with all the new comics releases because of personal stuff etc.. There was also the sheer hatred and bigotry of some comic book fans, who foamed at the mouth every time a character that wasn’t a straight white male starred in their own book or if female characters weren’t drawn in an early 90s Image male gaze-y way. Creators and companies weren’t exempt from this either from Howard Chaykin’s transphobia and Islamophobia in his low selling Image book Divided States of Hysteria to the revelation that new Marvel Editor-in-Chief C.B. Cebulski lied about writing comics under the Japanese pseudonym Akira Yoshida for years and suffered little to no consequences for it.

However, there was a lot to love about the comic books of 2017, and I found solace, entertainment, and inspiration in many books from (becoming) old favorites about godly pop stars and dark knights to intriguing new titles about all girl fight clubs and young people experimented on by the government.

 

  1. Batman #14-37 (DC)

In 2017, writer Tom King and a crack team of artists including David Finch, Clay Mann, Mitch Gerads, Mikel Janin, Joelle Jones, and Jordie Bellaire explored almost every nook and cranny of the Dark Knight’s world in their work on Batman. Sure, there were epic arcs featuring one on one battles with Bane, a yearlong gang war with the Joker and Riddler, and a little family reunion in the “Button” crossover. But what Batman resonate as a comic book was the standalone and two part stories from King and Gerads showing the sweetness of the relationship between Batman and Catwoman to the emotional tale of Kite Man (Hell yes). King has a real knack for telling O. Henry-esque stories of ideas that humanize iconic characters none more so than “Superfriends” where Batman and Superman go on a double date with Catwoman and Lois Lane. An artistic highlight of the book was Joelle Jones’ beautiful, savage, and a little bit sexy depiction of Batman and Catwoman fighting for their love against the most evil of exes.

  1. Josie and the Pussycats #4-9 (Archie)

Josie and the Pussycats is a gorgeous, funny book that ended much too soon although it is nice to see artist Audrey Mok working on the main Archie title. Writers Cameron DeOrdio and Marguerite Bennett craft the rare Archie book that looks at both romantic and platonic relationships from the POV of young adults, not teenagers. They, artist Mok, and colorist Kelly Fitzpatrick imbue the title with a Saturday Morning cartoon zaniness, including high speed boat and motorcycle chases, kidnappings, and jokes about the polar bears from The Golden Compass. Yes, DeOrdio and Bennett overload all kinds of pop culture references and allusions in Josie, but it adds to the book’s energetic feel along with Mok’s fantastic fashion designs and Fitzpatrick’s bold colors. Josie and the Pussycats has some real heart to it with characters having all kinds of intense conversations about love, friendship, and fame between the over-the-top setpieces.

  1. Heavenly Blues #1-4 (Scout)

Writer Ben Kahn and artist Bruno Hidalgo’s Heavenly Blues blends the cosmology and philosophical and theological themes of Vertigo classics like Sandman and Lucifer with a quick and dirty heist thriller as a band of criminals, including a Great Depression Era thief, a girl who was sentenced to burn during the Salem Witch Trials, and a bisexual cowboy team up to break into heaven and steal something you may have heard of. Witty writing from Kahn and rhythmic art from Hidalgo that flows from the building of the Great Pyramids to the Old West and even an angel lounging in sweatpants keeps the story on its toes with flashback to each thief’s past life create an emotional connection to them. This is the perfect comic for folks who like to think about the nature of evil or the possibility of an afterlife while also watching Oceans 11 or Logan Lucky with a whiskey on the rocks.

 

  1. Shade the Changing Girl #4-12 (DC/Young Animal)

The crown jewel of DC’s Young Animal imprint, Shade: The Changing Girl is a beautiful, meditative look at identity and humanity from the perspective of a bird alien Metan girl named Loma Shade, who has possessed the body of teenage girl bully. Cecil Castellucci, Marley Zarcone, and Kelly Fitzpatrick’s story really took off when Shade decides to hit the road first for Gotham and eventually to meet her idol, Honey Rich, the aging star of a 1950s sitcom that was popular all over the galaxy. Zarcone’s artwork is extremely fluid and complements Shade’s reaction to the influx of stimulus all around her that is humanity as she begins to understand concepts like nostalgia and of course the big ones: life and death. Shade the Changing Girl is more poem than sci-fi thriller/mindbender, and Castellucci’s poetic captions, Zarcone’s sincere facial expressions, and Fitzpatrick’s, well, groovy colors bypass the critical part of the brain and go straight for the emotional center. It is an empathetic study into how humans communicate and navigate this complex world from a visitor from an equally as complex society so hence conflict.

  1. Generation Gone #1-5 (Image)

Comics’ enfant terrible Ales Kot makes his triumphant return with Generation Gone, which is one of his most accessible works that still takes shots at the kyriarchy and patriarchy through the lens of the “superhero” origin story. Artist Andre Araujo and colorist Chris O’Halloran provide equal parts majestic, disgusting, and triumphant wide screen visuals throughout the series from bodies being stripped down to bone, muscles, and organs to flying in the sunset. The way that the three main kids Elena, Baldwin, and Nick is a little bit of techno-organic body horror like Scanners filtered through 2017. Kot avoids typical superhero team up tropes and has them constantly at each other’s throats that all really boils down to toxic masculinity, especially Nick, who is like Max Landis with a healing factor. Generation Gone is an epic and visceral story with all kinds of carnage and big explosions that is ably balanced by Ales Kot’s nuanced characterization. There’s some decent world building, but it takes a backseat to Elena, Baldwin, and Nick’s journey and squabbles along the way.

  1. The Wicked + the Divine #25-33, 455 AD, Christmas Special (Image)

In its fourth year (Or “Imperial Phase”) as a title, Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson’s The Wicked + the Divine became both more self-indulgent and introspective before the ending the year with more emotional destruction and much needed side dish of pure fanservice. The main focus is on the relationships of the Pantheon from Dionysus’ truly soulful friendship with Baphomet (They spend most of an issue talking in the dark, and it’s lovely.) to the intense connection between Persephone and Sakhmet and the older brother/little sister Baal and Minerva that takes a big turn for the disquieting. Even though McKelvie’s figures and fashion decisions are still flawless as usual, WicDiv uncovers every metaphorical wrinkle or mole on the Pantheon members by the time “Imperial Phase” ends in a truly soul crushing manner like the slow build in “In the Air Tonight” before the epic drums. And after it’s over, Gillen and a host of talented guest artists deliver a comic that is sexy, thoughtful, and filled to the brim of feels showing what the Pantheon were like when they were young and less dead. The Kris Anka and Jen Bartel Baal/Inanna short is most definitely the hottest thing I read in 2017.

 

  1. Kim and Kim: Love is A Battlefield #1-4 (Black Mask)

Shifting the focus from Kim Q to Kim D in this fantastic sequel to the Eisner nominated miniseries Kim and Kim, Mags Visaggio, Eva Cabrera, and Claudia Aguirre confidently tell the story of a woman trying to get over an ex that she really cared for, but wasn’t good for her. There are also mech suits, space battles, basses being used as a blunt instrument, and all kinds of space bounty hunter shenanigans. The rift and reunion between the Fighting Kim’s is super relatable as who hasn’t been disappointed in a friend for returning to the same, not cool ex over and over again. However, Visaggio gives the Kim’s great growth as friends and in their chosen career as bounty hunters by the time the miniseries wraps. On the visual front, Eva Cabrera can choreograph the hell out of a fight scene, and there is still plenty of pink from Claudia Aguirre. Kim and Kim: Love is a Battlefield is a smorgasbord of quips, fun sci-fi worldbuilding, and real friend talk and improves on its already pretty awesome predecessor.

 

  1. Mister Miracle #1-5 (DC)

Jack Kirby would have turned 100 in 2017, and there was arguably no better tribute to his imaginative work as an artist and writer than Tom King and Mitch Gerads’ Mister Miracle comic. I know I’m double dipping with King comics on the list, but he’s just that good. In his art, Gerads teaches the old dog of the nine panel grid some new tricks and uses it for everything from a tender love scene between Mister Miracle and Big Barda to him getting repeatedly beaten by his older brother Orion, who plays an antagonistic role in the series. The bar-like grid of the comic book he stars in is the one prison Mister Miracle can’t escape from. (Wow, that got meta.) Gerads uses a trippy, almost television fuzz effect to show Scott’s tattered psyche as he faces death with his escape artistry, goes to war against Apokolips, and is sentenced to execution. King’s gift of writing both the mundane and utterly cosmic comes in handy in Mister Miracle whose most memorable scenes are Scott and Barda cuddling and joking around, not the big battle scenes. Again, he and Mitch Gerads find the human and the epic, which is definitely something the King would be proud of. (Big Barda was patterned off his beloved wife Roz.)

  1. Giant Days #22-33, 2017 Special (BOOM!)

Although the facial expressions that Max Sarin and Liz Fleming draw are truly outrageous at times, Giant Days is a fairly naturally plotted comic with the friendships, relationships, and life statuses of Esther, Susan, and Daisy ebbing and flowing like normal university students. They begin the year as BFFs for life, but start to drift apart towards the end of the year as Susan and Daisy’s relationships with McGraw and Ingrid move onto the next level. Esther is kind of stuck in the lurch as her penchant for drama bombs starts to backfire. Giant Days nails the constantly evolving fluid thingamajig that is relationships as a young adult.  As an added bonus, we also get to see how the girls act and feel differently around their family versus friends as Susan’s way too big and complicated family makes quite the impression. And, of course, Giant Days is very funny, and John Allison, Max Sarin, and Liz Fleming mine the comedy out of everything from the deliciousness of home cooking, the grossness of nerd dorm food concoctions, and even a video game wedding. (Poor Dean.)

  1. Heavy Vinyl #1-4 (BOOM!)

Reading Carly Usdin, Nina Vakeuva, Irene Flores, and Rebecca Palty’s Heavy Vinyl is like the comic book equivalent of relaxing in a hot tub, but the hot tub is either cupcakes or adorable Corgi puppies. (Take your pick.) It’s about a teenage girl named Chris in 1998, who has just gotten her dream job at a record store and her first big crush on Maggie, her co-worker, who is drawn like a shoujo manga protagonist. But then she’s inducted into a top secret vigilante fight club and has to rescue the frontwoman of her favorite band. It’s high concept and slice of life just like Vakueva’s art is comedic, beautiful, and a little badass. Carly Usdin does a good job in just four issues of giving each member of the fight club their own distinct personalities and relationships while doubling down on the cuteness and awkwardness of Chris and Maggie’s budding romance. But what makes Heavy Vinyl  the best comic of 2017 is its belief in the power of women and music to change the world…

Legacy: A House of Night Graphic Novel Gets a New Edition in May

Dark Horse Comics has revealed the new edition of the House of Night graphic novel from best-selling mother/daughter duo P.C. and Kristin Cast’s vampyric House of Night prose novel series! The new edition of Legacy: A House of Night Graphic Novel features a gorgeous new cover by Joëlle Jones and a new foreword by Kristin Cast.

Legacy: A House of Night Graphic Novel features an all-star slate of comics creators. Fish in a Barrel writer Kent Dalian teamed up with P.C. and Kristin to compose the House of Night graphic novel series. Lady Killer creator Joëlle Jones lends her breathtaking illustrative skills to the series as the primary artist with an impressive roster of artists teaming up on issues: Karl Kerschl, Joshua Covey, Daniel Krall, Jonathan Case, and Eric Canete.

The Legacy: A House of Night Graphic Novel follows the events of the first novel Marked. Zoey Redbird was an average teenager worrying about grades, boys, and breakouts. But priorities change when you’re marked as a vampyre. Zoey leaves her religious family to enroll in the vampyre academy House of Night, which mixes the all-too-familiar high school problems with elemental magic, as well as the physicals changes that accompany a craving for human blood! Zoey and her group of devoted friends turn to The Fledgling Handbook, a historical vampyre tome, to better understand their place this big, new supernatural world.

The Legacy: A House of Night Graphic Novel goes on sale May 30, 2018! The 128-page tome retails for $14.99.

Preview: Batman #35

Batman #35

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Joëlle Jones
In Shops: Nov 15, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“Dream of Me” part three! Has the Caped Crusader passed the point of no return? Turns out he’s going to need a little help from his friends, but this help comes with a downside: Batman’s true intentions will be exposed.

Preview: Batman #34

Batman #34

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Joëlle Jones
In Shops: Nov 01, 2017
SRP: $2.99

“Rules Of Engagement” part two! Batman is on a quest in the desert, far from his Gotham City home. His friends and allies think he’s gone crazy, and his mission puts him far outside the law. Waiting for him at the center of the chaos is an old enemy… and plenty of old demons.

Review: Batman #33

Following his marriage proposal to Catwoman, Batman leaves Gotham City on a quest of renewal and redemption. As he travels and fights, he encounters members of his family-each disturbed by Batman’s journey, each ready to stand in his way, each ready to push back against Batman’s stubborn determination to evolve into something better than a superhero.

Artist Joëlle Jones joins writer Tom King for the first part of the new story arc “A Dream of Me” which sees the Bat and Cat on a journey… but to where? By the end of the issue it’s clear exactly what’s going on and makes sense considering the engagement of these two. The issue though feels like a prelude and a rather slow one at that. We get a lot of small details to examine and interpret, something King has done throughout his run, but the comic itself is generally sparse in both story and art. This is a much more dialed back issue, especially compared to last arc’s “War of Jokes and Riddles.”

What’s interesting is Jones’ art which for most of the issue is fantastic and it’s great to see her on a high profile book. Where things go a bit sideways is in her depiction of some characters, particularly the Robins. Damian, Dick, and Jason all look too much alike and it’s hard to tell them apart at times. Alfred too looks a bit different than his normal depiction which feels a bit off. But, beyond that, the art is fantastic and shows Jones should be given more high profile comics down the road.

The comic is an interesting one and in some ways continues the fantastic story King has set up but in other ways things feel like a trip. This is a prelude in every way and sets up… something that could be interesting. King has proven he can do thought provoking before and this looks like it’ll be that sort of arc. A step back but still an entertaining read.

Story: Tom King Art: Joëlle Jones
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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