Tag Archives: JAY DAVID RAMOS

Review: Year of the Villain: Joker #1

Year of the Villain: Joker #1

In general, I haven’t paid too much attention to DC’s Year of the Villain. As a concept, it hasn’t really jumped out to me. But, with John Carpenter writing Year of the Villain: Joker, I had to check it out.

The Joker, and his new companion the Six of Hearts, run around Gotham with the Joker attempting to get his groove back. But how does he go about that?

Carpenter is joined by Anthony Burch on writing duties and the story is rather entertaining. There’s an interesting focus on the insanity of the Joker from the perspective of someone else. Carpenter and Burch capture the humor of the Joker. There’s a playful randomness about it all that keeps readers on their toys.

It’s not all smooth. The comic is a bit of a drag to stat but as the story gets going to entertainment factor ups and goes into overdrive when the Joker crosses path with another villain at a convenient store.

The art is a bit mixed. Philip Tan handles the pencils with Marc Deering, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, and Tan on ink. Jay David Ramos handles the colors. The art towards the beginning of the comic doesn’t feel like the same as what’s at the end. It’s a weird shift. At first, I disliked the art but by the end, I really enjoyed it, especially when Joker does his dynamic duo impersonation. The detail of saggy costumes is fantastic.

Year of the Villain: Joker #1 is a bit mixed for me. I started off hating it but by the end found myself really enjoying it and my opinion completely changed. Where I struggled to start I flew through the end. I almost stopped reading it at one point. But, by the end, glad I didn’t. The comic doesn’t have the insight I’d hope from Carpenter’s writing but it has his humor. Even if you’re not interested in the “Year of the Villain,” this is a comic you can pick up and enjoy.

Story: John Carpenter, Anthony Burch Art: Philip Tan
Ink: Marc Deering, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, Philip Tan
Color: Jay David Ramos
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Doctor Mirage #2 (of 5)

DOCTOR MIRAGE #2 (of 5)

Written by MAGDALENE VISAGGIO
Art by NICK ROBLES
Colors by JORDIE BELLAIRE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by PHILIP TAN with JAY DAVID RAMOS
Cover B by COLLEEN DORAN
Cover C by CLAUDIA IANNICIELLO
Pre-Order Edition by ZU ORZU
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 25th

Death was no obstacle for Doctor Mirage, who could speak to the departed. But what happens if she’s one of the deceased?

Her new ally, Grace, claims to be in the same dead boat, but can you really trust someone so young and inexperienced?

How did Doctor Mirage end up in this spot? Find out here!

DOCTOR MIRAGE #2 (of 5)

Preview: Doctor Mirage #1 (of 5)

DOCTOR MIRAGE #1 (of 5)

Written by MAGDALENE VISAGGIO
Art by NICK ROBLES
Colors by JORDIE BELLAIRE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by PHILIP TAN with JAY DAVID RAMOS
Cover B by ROBERTA INGRANATA with WARNIA SAHADEWA
Cover C by NICK ROBLES
Pre-Order Edition by JEFF DEKAL
Haunted Variant Edition by MJ KIM with JORDIE BELLAIRE
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale AUGUST 28th

How do you solve the case of your own death?

Paranormal expert Doctor Shan Fong Mirage was born with the ability to see and speak to the dead—an ability that has mysteriously stopped working. Have her powers failed or is something far more sinister at work?

Will she figure out her fate and the fate of the one she loves the most? Valiant’s gripping supernatural mystery starts here!

DOCTOR MIRAGE #1 (of 5)

Review: Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre

The lead up to Absolute Carnage continues with the next stop… Mania!

Story: Cullen Bunn
Art: Joshua Cassara, Alberto Alburquerque
Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Color: Jay David Ramos

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle & comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Carnage Ramps Up his Hunt in Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre this July

Cletus Kasady is kicking off his murder spree before Absolute Carnage arrives this August! And the trail of bodies will first pile up in July’s Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre!

For weeks, serial killer Carnage has been hunting former symbiote hosts and killing them. Next in the crosshairs of his inky tendrils is Andi Benton, formerly Mania, who’s back to living in Philadelphia and without any symbiote to save her…

With terror and throat-gripping action, this utterly alien thriller will mark only the beginning of Carnage’s insatiable bloodlust.

Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre #1 is out July 24 from writer Cullen Bunn, art by Alberto Jimenez Albuquerque and Joshua Cassara, colors by Jay David Ramos, and a cover by Declan Shalvey.

Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre #1

Review: X-Men: The Exterminated #1

In the aftermath of Extermination, the X-Men mourn for their fallen brother, Cable. But no one is taking it harder than his adopted daughter, Hope Summers. Will Hope be able to cope with the loss, or will she be led down a dark path that she won’t be able to return from? Only Jean Grey can save Hope from herself! Plus, celebrate the life of Nathan Summers with a story from his past by Chris Claremont!

Cable is dead, sort of, during the events of “Extermination” having been killed by his younger self. And, not surprising, “post event” (the last issue of Extermination hasn’t been released yet) we get an issue mourning the loss of the character. Broken into two stories, X-Men: The Exterminated is an ok follow up but lacks, something. Having read it, I walked away having just spent the 15 minutes of my time and instantly the comic was pretty forgettable. It’s not that it’s bad, it’s just not memorable in any way. There’s no revelation. There’s not even much emotion. It’s just a safe comic that feels like a box checked off more than anything.

The first story follows Hope and Jean Grey as they set off to close down Cables various hideouts. Hope of course has a mission of her own that’s very predictable. The two go back and forth about what Cable meant to Hope and the banter feels like it’s more about Hope’s absence from comics more than her time with Cable. There’s much left on the table such as Hope sort of being Jean Grey’s granddaughter in a way and where Hope has been. Jean shows little emotion in the mourning and Hope comes off a bit cold beyond the anger she shows at Bishop and Deadpool, two characters who have a lot of history with Cable as well. Out of it all, Deadpool is the one who delivers the most emotional bit laying his cards on the table in a way. Writers Zac Thompson and Lonnie Nadler seem to not shake the tree much in an way and the script is fairly predictable in its end. It’s a story that’s both emotionless and without much point beyond answering the question about what happened to all of Cable’s technology and weapons?

The art by Neil Edwards with color by David Ramos and lettering by Joe Sabino too is forgettable. Again, it’s not bad but much like the story itself nothing stands out. The settings are generic sci-fi. There’s a mention of Cable enjoying cyberpunk but what’s presented doesn’t feel much like that. The environments have the minimal detail at no point emphasizing how much there really is or at least how much could get out and do some damage.

The second story reflects on a bit after Cable, Nathan, is born where his parents head to Alaska for some relaxation. It rewrites some of the comic history but it’s interesting mostly for the return of classic X-Men scribe Chris Claremont. The story itself has its touching moments but again misses any real interest. What’s most fascinating is the perspective of the narrative of the story being told. Nothing said or shown is vital and it all feels like its been included because it deals with baby Cable and fits the first story’s theme of parents and their kids (on a couple of levels).

The art by Ramon Rosanas with color by Nolan Woodard and lettering by Joe Sabino is ok with a throwback quality to it all. The comic feels like it could have fit into the late 80s or early 90s as far as style and would have fit being a backup story then.

The comic as a whole is ok. It never feels like it really honors Cable and by the end you’re left with muttering “that’s it?”. Nothing is vital and again this feels more like a checking of the box than anything else. There isn’t some deep thought about who Cable is or his impact on X history, instead it’s a very surface level experience that lacks any real emotion or depth.

Story: Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler, Chris Claremont
Art: Neil Edwards, Ramon Rosanas
Color: Jay David Ramos, Nolan Woodard Lettering: Joe Sabino
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: X-Men: Gold Vol. 7 God War

Kitty Pryde has left Colossus at the altar and the X-Men are shaken in the aftermath. X-Men: Gold Vol. 7 God War focuses on the days after the wedding and loss from various characters’ perspectives.

X-Men: Gold Vol. 7 God War features issues #31-36 and Annual #1 from Marc Guggenheim, Leah Williams, Monty Nero, Pere Perez, Michele Bandini, Simone Buonfantino, Giovanni valletta, Djibril Morissette-Phan, Alitha E. Martinez, Craig Yeung, Jay David Ramos, Matt Milla, Erick Arciniega, Dono Sanchez-Almara, and Michael Garland.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores on December 11! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Black Order #1

The breakout characters from Avengers: Infinity War are getting their own limited series picking up from Avengers: No Surrender.

Written by Derek Landy, with art by Phillip Tan, ink by Marc Deering, Guillermo Ortega, Le Beau Underwood, color by Jay David Ramos, and lettering by VC’ Clayton Cowles, the villains take the spotlight!

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: X-Men: Blue #24

X-Men: Blue #24

Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Jorge Molina
Color: Matt Milla, Jay David Ramos Letterer: VC’s Joe Caramagna
Cover: Jorge Molina
Graphic Designer: Jay Bowen, Anthony Gambino
X-Men Group Editor: Mark Paniccia Editor: Darren Shan Assistant Editor: Chris Robinson
Rated T+
In Shops: Mar 28, 2018
SRP: $3.99

CRY HAVOK Part 2
• The X-MEN are missing, but MAGNETO mobilizes against his enemies! His first target: SEBASTIAN SHAW!
• What lengths will MAGNETO go to uncover his enemies’ secrets?
• Meanwhile, JIMMY HUDSON and BLOODSTORM face the MALICE-possessed POLARIS!

Review: X-Men Blue #23

626719__SX1280_QL80_TTD_With the X-Men lost in space, Emma Frost, Havok, Bastion and Miss Sinister hatch their devious plans!  Is there a worse time for their most dangerous enemies to strike?  And wouldn’t it make matters much, much worse if Polaris once again fell victim to the body-stealing Malice?

The X-Men are off in space, in what I think is a very boring story involving Venom and symbiotes. With them gone, Magneto isn’t just sitting around waiting for his charges to return. X-Men #23 has Emma Frost has teamed up with Bastion, Miss Sinister, and Havok to create some sort of technology or biological means for mutants to be granted a secondary mutation. It’s a revelation that has me wondering if I missed something in past issues.

Writer Cullen Bunn brings us a comic that really had me feeling like I missed something and just drops the reader smack into the middle of the grand villainous plan. Maybe I’m just used to some build up, or at least some hints in previous issues that something is cooking, but here we are. It just felt like a lot of information to take in, crammed into a few panels, and really should have been laid out over a few issues.

And I was very excited to see Polaris becoming more visible in this book, as she is one of my favorite characters, but it doesn’t take Bunn long to have me rolling my eyes and ends this issue with something that happens way too easily. I don’t want to say what and ruin it but any long time X-Men fans will probably feel as let down as I was by the turn of events. I just don’t appreciate how weak it makes the character look and how easily things turn.

On a positive, I enjoyed the art done by Jorge Molina with colors by Matt Milla and Jay David Ramos. The characters look good, there’s movement and expression on their faces. I can’t say anything bad about it. It’s just solid art that unfortunately doesn’t save this issue from the story.

Overall, as you probably have guessed, I was not overly impressed with this issue. This new story feels rushed and crammed into a few panels, and a lot of players are thrown into this pretty quickly. The art is nice to look at, but it doesn’t really do much to alleviate the feeling of my head spinning after taking everything in. I’m all for a good story and lining up some great villains, but I prefer a build up and not just dumping everything out in a few pages and saying “here you go! process…”  Here’s hoping things slow down a bit next issue.

Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Jorge Molina
Color: Matt Milla, Jay David Ramos Letterer: VC’s Joe Caramagna
Cover: Jorge Molina Variant: Clayton Crain
Story: 5.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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