Tag Archives: JAY DAVID RAMOS

Review: Annihilation: Scourge

The Cancerverse has invaded the Negative Zone and Earth’s heroes must gather to stop the spread before it breaks into their own universe.

Annihilation: Scourge collects Annihilation: Scourge Alpha, Fantastic Four, Nova, Silver Surfer, Beta Ray Bill, and Omega.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg, Michael Moreci, Christos Gage, Dan Abnett
Art: Juanan Ramirez, Cian Tomey, Ibraim Roberson, Alberto Albuquerque, Diego Olortegui, Paul Davidson, Manuel Garcia
Color: Federico Blee, Carlos Lopez, Jay David Ramos, Erick Arciniega, Matt Milla, Rachelle Rosenberg
Ink: Juan Vlasco, Cam Smith, Scott Hanna
Letterer: Cory Petit, Joe Sabino, Travis Lanham, Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops now and bookstores on March 24! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon: https://amzn.to/39RJ8Ey
Kindle/comiXology: https://amzn.to/38Ns29i
TFAW: https://shrsl.com/25zrw
Zeus Comics: https://www.zeuscomics.com/products/69085/annihilation-scourge-tp?tag=graphicpolicy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Dark Agnes #1 is a not-so-great pulp yarn

Dark Agnes #1

Dark Anges #1 is based on a more obscure Robert E. Howard creation that may have been one of the inspirations for Red Sonja. Agnes de la Ferre aka Dark Agnes is a French woman, who killed the disgusting man she was going to be forced to marry and became a great swordswoman and adventurer. Writer Becky Cloonan, artist Luca Pizzari, and colorist Jay David Ramos definitely understand the swashbuckling, pulpy tone of a Howard story. Even if the execution is lacking in times in the parts of the story that aren’t dialogue. The characters, Dark Agnes and her sidekick Etienne, are more stock than three dimensional. Cloonan writes some witty dialogue and places them in settings that would be out of place in a capital “R” French Romantic novel written in the 19th century, but set centuries before.

However, Dark Agnes #1’s chief weakness isn’t with its prose, but with the visuals. This comic seems to suffer from the “Dynamite problem”, which is having a fantastic, inviting cover and incomprehensible-to-above average (At times) interior art. If it wasn’t for Cloonan’s shout-y dialogue, the initial scene of Dark Agnes rescuing Etienne would have zero suspense. Luca Pizzari handles the big reactions, or flashback dreams, but not the little things that make a set piece great in Dark Agnes #1. There are too many moving parts in his action sequences, and a scene that should be epic (Aka Dark Agnes kicking ass with a sword in her mouth.) falls flat because the focal point on the panel is off center. However, Jay David Ramos does a decent job emphasizing Agnes’ flame red mane as well as using a muddy palette to evoke the stench of stereotypical “Dark Ages” France. He uses brighter colors when Etienne and Dark Agnes take on a rich woman and her nun companion to protect towards the end of the first issue.

One thing that these modern Robert E. Howard adaptations can do is add interiority and shading to pulp archetypes. However, Dark Agnes #1 doesn’t do that, for better or worse. I hate to say it, but Becky Cloonan and Luca Pizzari basically transpose the story of Red Sonja to medieval France. And it’s not intrigued, well-researched medieval France, but just a backdrop for swashbuckling adventures and interspersed French dialogue. The Duke of Alencon seems to be the bad guy, but he could easily be substituted by the Duke of Burgundy or the Sheriff of Nottingham or any such mustache twirler. Hopefully, his real menace is shown down the road.

I do like the basic premise for the character of Dark Agnes, and that she is a woman in an incredibly oppressive time period, who overcomes trauma to be a badass. Even though the storytelling around her is wooden, Cloonan, Pizzari, and Ramos give her true energy to match her flame red hair beginning with the opening of Dark Agnes #1 where she rescues the “damsel in distress” Etienne from execution in a scene that is actually pretty funny. Her sheer swagger coupled with the foreboding images of her dreams sow the seeds of a potentially interesting pulp heroine, and the final pages definitely up the stakes. In video game terms, think “fast travel”.

I definitely wish that Becky Cloonan had the opportunity to both write and draw Dark Agnes because her work on Dark Horse’s Conan shows that she is a natural fit for high energy, bloody adventures. However, that is not the case, and the visuals of Dark Agnes #1 make the book seem more sluggish than exciting. The writing and plotting isn’t pristine either with a generic sense of setting and several cliches even though Cloonan’s dialogue is musical and humorous sometimes. It’s a comic to definitely trade wait for

Story: Becky Cloonan Art: Luca Pizzari
Colors: Jay David Ramos Letters: Travis Lanham
Story: 7.3 Art: 5.8 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dark Agnes #1

Swashbuckling adventure awaits as Robert E. Howard’s Dark Agnes comes to Marvel Comics!

Story: Becky Cloonan
Art: Luca Pizzari
Color: Jay David Ramos
Letterer: Travis Lanham

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Incoming #1

Get a look as to what’s coming in 2020 with Incoming #1. Marvel teases what we can expect in the months to come in this end of the year oversized comic.

Story: Various
Art: Various
Color: Various
Letterer: Travis Lanham

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Year of the Villain: Joker #1

Year of the Villain: Joker #1

In general, I haven’t paid too much attention to DC’s Year of the Villain. As a concept, it hasn’t really jumped out to me. But, with John Carpenter writing Year of the Villain: Joker, I had to check it out.

The Joker, and his new companion the Six of Hearts, run around Gotham with the Joker attempting to get his groove back. But how does he go about that?

Carpenter is joined by Anthony Burch on writing duties and the story is rather entertaining. There’s an interesting focus on the insanity of the Joker from the perspective of someone else. Carpenter and Burch capture the humor of the Joker. There’s a playful randomness about it all that keeps readers on their toys.

It’s not all smooth. The comic is a bit of a drag to stat but as the story gets going to entertainment factor ups and goes into overdrive when the Joker crosses path with another villain at a convenient store.

The art is a bit mixed. Philip Tan handles the pencils with Marc Deering, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, and Tan on ink. Jay David Ramos handles the colors. The art towards the beginning of the comic doesn’t feel like the same as what’s at the end. It’s a weird shift. At first, I disliked the art but by the end, I really enjoyed it, especially when Joker does his dynamic duo impersonation. The detail of saggy costumes is fantastic.

Year of the Villain: Joker #1 is a bit mixed for me. I started off hating it but by the end found myself really enjoying it and my opinion completely changed. Where I struggled to start I flew through the end. I almost stopped reading it at one point. But, by the end, glad I didn’t. The comic doesn’t have the insight I’d hope from Carpenter’s writing but it has his humor. Even if you’re not interested in the “Year of the Villain,” this is a comic you can pick up and enjoy.

Story: John Carpenter, Anthony Burch Art: Philip Tan
Ink: Marc Deering, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, Philip Tan
Color: Jay David Ramos
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Doctor Mirage #2 (of 5)

DOCTOR MIRAGE #2 (of 5)

Written by MAGDALENE VISAGGIO
Art by NICK ROBLES
Colors by JORDIE BELLAIRE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by PHILIP TAN with JAY DAVID RAMOS
Cover B by COLLEEN DORAN
Cover C by CLAUDIA IANNICIELLO
Pre-Order Edition by ZU ORZU
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 25th

Death was no obstacle for Doctor Mirage, who could speak to the departed. But what happens if she’s one of the deceased?

Her new ally, Grace, claims to be in the same dead boat, but can you really trust someone so young and inexperienced?

How did Doctor Mirage end up in this spot? Find out here!

DOCTOR MIRAGE #2 (of 5)

Preview: Doctor Mirage #1 (of 5)

DOCTOR MIRAGE #1 (of 5)

Written by MAGDALENE VISAGGIO
Art by NICK ROBLES
Colors by JORDIE BELLAIRE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by PHILIP TAN with JAY DAVID RAMOS
Cover B by ROBERTA INGRANATA with WARNIA SAHADEWA
Cover C by NICK ROBLES
Pre-Order Edition by JEFF DEKAL
Haunted Variant Edition by MJ KIM with JORDIE BELLAIRE
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale AUGUST 28th

How do you solve the case of your own death?

Paranormal expert Doctor Shan Fong Mirage was born with the ability to see and speak to the dead—an ability that has mysteriously stopped working. Have her powers failed or is something far more sinister at work?

Will she figure out her fate and the fate of the one she loves the most? Valiant’s gripping supernatural mystery starts here!

DOCTOR MIRAGE #1 (of 5)

Review: Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre

The lead up to Absolute Carnage continues with the next stop… Mania!

Story: Cullen Bunn
Art: Joshua Cassara, Alberto Alburquerque
Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Color: Jay David Ramos

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle & comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Carnage Ramps Up his Hunt in Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre this July

Cletus Kasady is kicking off his murder spree before Absolute Carnage arrives this August! And the trail of bodies will first pile up in July’s Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre!

For weeks, serial killer Carnage has been hunting former symbiote hosts and killing them. Next in the crosshairs of his inky tendrils is Andi Benton, formerly Mania, who’s back to living in Philadelphia and without any symbiote to save her…

With terror and throat-gripping action, this utterly alien thriller will mark only the beginning of Carnage’s insatiable bloodlust.

Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre #1 is out July 24 from writer Cullen Bunn, art by Alberto Jimenez Albuquerque and Joshua Cassara, colors by Jay David Ramos, and a cover by Declan Shalvey.

Web of Venom: Funeral Pyre #1

Review: X-Men: The Exterminated #1

In the aftermath of Extermination, the X-Men mourn for their fallen brother, Cable. But no one is taking it harder than his adopted daughter, Hope Summers. Will Hope be able to cope with the loss, or will she be led down a dark path that she won’t be able to return from? Only Jean Grey can save Hope from herself! Plus, celebrate the life of Nathan Summers with a story from his past by Chris Claremont!

Cable is dead, sort of, during the events of “Extermination” having been killed by his younger self. And, not surprising, “post event” (the last issue of Extermination hasn’t been released yet) we get an issue mourning the loss of the character. Broken into two stories, X-Men: The Exterminated is an ok follow up but lacks, something. Having read it, I walked away having just spent the 15 minutes of my time and instantly the comic was pretty forgettable. It’s not that it’s bad, it’s just not memorable in any way. There’s no revelation. There’s not even much emotion. It’s just a safe comic that feels like a box checked off more than anything.

The first story follows Hope and Jean Grey as they set off to close down Cables various hideouts. Hope of course has a mission of her own that’s very predictable. The two go back and forth about what Cable meant to Hope and the banter feels like it’s more about Hope’s absence from comics more than her time with Cable. There’s much left on the table such as Hope sort of being Jean Grey’s granddaughter in a way and where Hope has been. Jean shows little emotion in the mourning and Hope comes off a bit cold beyond the anger she shows at Bishop and Deadpool, two characters who have a lot of history with Cable as well. Out of it all, Deadpool is the one who delivers the most emotional bit laying his cards on the table in a way. Writers Zac Thompson and Lonnie Nadler seem to not shake the tree much in an way and the script is fairly predictable in its end. It’s a story that’s both emotionless and without much point beyond answering the question about what happened to all of Cable’s technology and weapons?

The art by Neil Edwards with color by David Ramos and lettering by Joe Sabino too is forgettable. Again, it’s not bad but much like the story itself nothing stands out. The settings are generic sci-fi. There’s a mention of Cable enjoying cyberpunk but what’s presented doesn’t feel much like that. The environments have the minimal detail at no point emphasizing how much there really is or at least how much could get out and do some damage.

The second story reflects on a bit after Cable, Nathan, is born where his parents head to Alaska for some relaxation. It rewrites some of the comic history but it’s interesting mostly for the return of classic X-Men scribe Chris Claremont. The story itself has its touching moments but again misses any real interest. What’s most fascinating is the perspective of the narrative of the story being told. Nothing said or shown is vital and it all feels like its been included because it deals with baby Cable and fits the first story’s theme of parents and their kids (on a couple of levels).

The art by Ramon Rosanas with color by Nolan Woodard and lettering by Joe Sabino is ok with a throwback quality to it all. The comic feels like it could have fit into the late 80s or early 90s as far as style and would have fit being a backup story then.

The comic as a whole is ok. It never feels like it really honors Cable and by the end you’re left with muttering “that’s it?”. Nothing is vital and again this feels more like a checking of the box than anything else. There isn’t some deep thought about who Cable is or his impact on X history, instead it’s a very surface level experience that lacks any real emotion or depth.

Story: Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler, Chris Claremont
Art: Neil Edwards, Ramon Rosanas
Color: Jay David Ramos, Nolan Woodard Lettering: Joe Sabino
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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