Tag Archives: iceman

Preview: Iceman #10

Iceman #10

(W) Sina Grace (A) Robert Gill (CA) Kevin Wada
Rated T+
In Shops: Feb 07, 2018
SRP: $3.99

ICEMAN VS. DAKEN Part 2
• With the X-MEN trapped in the Danger Room, it’s up to ICEMAN to protect the Institute and the students from DAKEN!
• Will having Omega-level powers be enough to go against an activated APOCALYPSE SEED?
• Are Bobby Drake’s students ready to fight and protect the mansion?!

Iceman #10

GLAAD Media Award Nominees Have Been Announced

The GLAAD Media Awards nominees have been announced, which includes a category for comic books. The awards “recognize and honor media for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community and the issues that affect their lives.”

The awards tend to recognize “mainstream” representation, so you’ll rarely see indie comics on the list.

Below are the nominees for comics, and comic related other media. You can find the full list at their site.

Professor Marston and the Wonder Women from Annapurna Pictures was nominated for “Outstanding Film – Wide Release.” The film is a loose history of the creation of Wonder Woman.

Wynonna Earp, which is based on a comic series, was nominated for “Outstanding Drama Series.”

Legion‘s episode “Chapter 8” was nominated for “Outstanding Individual Episode (in a series without a regular LGBTQ character).”

For comics, the nominees are:

America, by Gabby Rivera, Joe Quinones, Ming Doyle, Stacey Lee, Ramon Villalobos, Walden Wong, Jen Bartel, Annie Wu, Aud Koch, Flaviano, Joe Rivera, Paolo Rivera, José Villarrubia, Jordan Gibson, Tamra Bonvillain, Brittany Peer, Rachelle Rosenberg, Travis Lanham (Marvel Comics)

The Backstagers, by James Tynion IV, Rian Sygh, Walter Baiamonte, Jim Campbell (BOOM! Studios)

Batwoman, by Marguerite Bennett, James Tynion IV, Steve Epting, Jeromy N. Cox, Stephanie Hans, Renato Arlem, Adriano Honorato Lucas, Fernando Blanco, John Rauch, Deron Bennett (DC Comics)

Black Panther: World of Wakanda, by Roxane Gay, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Yona Harvey, Rembert Browne, Alitha E. Martinez, Manny Mederos, Joe Bennett, Afua Richardson, Roberto Poggi, Tamra Bonvillain, Rachelle Rosenberg, Virtual Calligraphy, Joe Sabino (Marvel Comics)

Deadman: Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love, by Sarah Vaughn, Lan Medina, Phillip Hester, José Villarrubia, Janice Chiang (DC Comics)

Goldie Vance, by Hope Larson, Jackie Ball, Brittney Williams, Noah Hayes, Sarah Stern, Jim Campbell (BOOM! Studios)

Iceman, by Sina Grace, Alessandro Vitti, Ibraim Roberson, Edgar Salazar, Edgar E. Tadeo, Robert Gill, Rachelle Rosenberg, Joe Sabino (Marvel Comics)

Lumberjanes, by Kat Leyh, Shannon Watters, Carolyn Nowak, Ayme Sotuyo, Maarta Laiho, Aubrey Aiese (BOOM! Studios)

Quantum Teens are Go, by Magdalene Visaggio, Eryk Donovan, Claudia Aguirre, Zakk Saam (Black Mask Studios)

The Woods, by James Tynion IV, Michael Dialynas, Ed Dukeshire (BOOM! Studios)

Why I Won’t Miss Marvel’s Iceman Comic

I have had such a love/hate relationship with Sina Grace‘s Iceman run over its nine issues, but issue nine tipped the scales from “Hey, this is a fun book. I’m feeling it” to “Daken is hot, and it’s nice to see Northstar and his husband, but wow, this is bad.” After spending the five issues having Bobby summon up his courage to come out as gay to his parents via letter, Grace and new series artist Robert Gill have had him let down his hair and relax in the four issues of the “Legacy” era. While having a reunion with his old Champions teammates, Bobby met a cute boy named Judah Miller in L.A. and was thinking about leaving the X-Men and moving to Southern California. This was really a big step for him as a character, and it seemed like Iceman was starting to explore his sexuality more for the first time since he came out in November 2015’s Uncanny X-Men #600.

But that didn’t happen. In Iceman #9, Gill continued to bring the beefcake, and it looked like he and Sina Grace were turning in yet another fun issue with Bobby introducing Judah to his X-Men family and a fight against the mutant-phobic (And probably homophobic) Purifiers while setting up Daken and his edgelord acolyte Amp as the main villain. A throwaway line about the gay former X-Force/X-Factor member Rictor breaking up with his longtime partner Shatterstar should have foreshadowed that events were going to take a turn for the sinister. This is when Daken stabs Judah and makes a joke about fridges, and the plot reason is basically to make Iceman angry and use more of his potential powers.

It’s the “bury your gays” trope in a comic that up to this point has seemed to be about finding your own unique identity even when people hate and criticize you like Bobby’s parents about his life as an X-Man and a gay man.

This trope is even more disappointing coming from Sina Grace, who is a gay man himself, and has written insightful graphic memoirs like Self-Obsessed Nothing Lasts Forever , and even Not My Bag is a humorous, relatable look at balancing an artistic career with a dead end retail job.

Instead of mining the potential of Iceman moving three time zones away from the X-Men and beginning his first romantic relationship with a man, Grace and Gill go for cheap drama and stale story elements. They don’t make an attempt to add Judah Miller to the great stable of “civilian” X-Men supporting characters, like Moira MacTaggert or Stevie Hunter, and just kill him off to further Iceman’s story and make Daken a “more evil” villain.

Also, changing Daken from a seductive manipulator who kisses Judah right in front of Bobby into a remorseless killer makes him much less interesting character. Sure, his powers might have an upgrade, and he might have a new look thanks to the Apocalypse death seed inside him, but the whole sexy bad boy thing goes away. After Daken kisses Judah, there’s a great opportunity for Bobby and Judah to have a talk about their difference in sexual experience, but I guess that’s too mature for a Marvel comic and takes time away from edgy jokes, fight scenes, and mind control drama.

In a very later seasons of The Walking Dead way, killing off Judah does up the stakes of Iceman and finally gives the book a real Big Bad after going more of a villain/antagonist of the week route ranging from Purifiers to Juggernaut and weirdly and slightly more sympathetically, a woman trying to make it in Hollywood by jerry-rigging her own Sentinels. However, Sina Grace falls into the trap of writing gay men as wholesome Modern Family/Will and Grace types, who enjoy fashion and brunching and bisexual men (Really man because Daken is the only bi character in Iceman.) as sexually predatory and villains.

We’re good for fun sexy times and intense flirtation, but definitely aren’t someone to bring home to the X-Men or parents.

I’m not saying that Grace really thinks bisexual men are sociopaths, but it’s a little sad that gay characters, like Bobby, and to a lesser extent after this issue, Judah, can be fully fleshed out human beings with desires, interests, and neuroses while a bisexual character gets coded as the bad guy, who, oops, makes funnier jokes than the good guys. Daken going completely off the rails without having a solid villain motivation beyond his “edgy” bisexual coding is a regressive, boring throwback to the queer coding of Disney villains and using society’s implicit biphobia to make them seem both evil and seductive. It’s up there with connecting Deadpool’s pansexuality to mental illness.

Daken doesn’t have to be a cuddly, Drag Race watching superhero with a strict, no kill policy, but he has to have a stronger character motivation beyond adolescent nihilism or “for the evils”. For example, Steve Orlando wrote the gay anti-hero Midnighter as a murderer, but he killed those who exploited others like he was exploited by the men who experimented on him and implanted his brain with technology to see the outcome of every fight. This is much more fascinating than depraved bisexual serial killer.

Throughout its run, Iceman has suffered from inconsistency in quality from the constantly changing artists to the heavy decompression and sometimes after school special tone of Bobby coming out to parents his in the first storyline. Up to this point, the “Legacy” storyline hasn’t been bad thanks to some fun guest stars like the younger Iceman, Champions, and Northstar and Kyle in Iceman #9, but then Sina Grace decided to sacrifice character growth for hackneyed plot “twists”.

Instead of doing something revolutionary with a rare opportunity to have a gay male character headline his own Marvel book, he falls back on the same old story patterns of mind controlled, queer coded villains and a dead, barely fleshed out love interest to make the light hearted hero darker and more vengeful.

It’s nice to have a mainstream comic book featuring a queer male character as a headliner, but we as readers deserve more than Will and Grace meets Women in Refrigerators, which is why I’ll be missing Iceman less than I probably should. His solo title had an excellent opportunity to zero in on Bobby’s relationships and growth, but now he’ll probably be back as the X-Men’s resident dad jokester and source of untapped potential without even getting to take a shot and see what his life would be outside that world.

Around the Tubes

It was new comic book day yesterday! What’d folks get? What’d you enjoy? What’d you dislike? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Kotaku – IGN Fires Editor-In-Chief For ‘Alleged Misconduct’ – Good to see folks cleaning house.

ICv2 – Five Trends to Watch in the Comics Business in 2018 – Think these will happen?

Newsarama – Jim Baikie Passes Away At 77 – Our thoughts are with his family and friends.

The Comichron – Kirkman’s Oblivion Song again leads advance reorders; Hawkman Found tops reorders – For those that dig the horse race.

 

Reviews

IGN – Batman #38

IGN – Batman and the Signal #1

Comic Book – Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepus Chronicles #1

IGN – Guardians of the Galaxy #150

AiPT! – Iceman #9

Geek Dad – Nightwing #36

IGN – Phoenix Resurrection #2

IGN – The Walking Dead #175

Exclusive Preview: Iceman #8

Iceman #8

(W) Sina Grace (A) Robert Gill (CA) Kevin Wada
Rated T+
In Shops: Dec 06, 2017
SRP: $3.99

Iceman vs. Iceman Part 1
• Iceman and his younger counterpart must team up…
• …against their parents?!
• The Drakes have discovered the existence of the young, time-traveling Iceman. But what are their true motives with this meeting?

Review: Iceman #7

Iceman #7 has Bobby making an Ice-kaiju to use in battle with his old Champions teammates and also has many character defining moments for him. Writer Sina Grace combines the quick banter and pitched fights of old school superhero team fights with some relationship bits like Iceman going a little further in a sexy way with Judah and chatting with the Champions about his overcompensating, macho ways back in the day at a Russian bakery. Robert Gill’s art is serviceable, and he does something interesting things with spacing like making the new X-Men headquarters in Central Park seemed very crowded compared to Judah and Bobby’s nightly walks in L.A. Rachelle Rosenberg’s colors are much the same way even though she makes Bobby’s ice powers look extra badass.

Even though the story is chock full of superhero guest stars, Grace and Gill manage to chisel out an image of Bobby as a hero and man. Iceman is comfortable in team settings, making the jokes, and teaching the younger heroes, but he also wants to strike out on his own, date a new cute guy, and knows that the X-Men are in capable hands. The “villain” in this issue are special effects designers who are hoping to impress a Hollywood studio with their almost lifelike Sentinel replicas. Some heroes would throw these women in jail or in The Raft or somewhere, but Bobby realizes their mechanical talents and desperateness to be significant somewhere and helps find them professor jobs. He can make dad jokes and be honest, empathetic, self-aware, and sometimes impulsive like the end of this issue.

Even though the Champions don’t have their own movie or TV show, like the X-Men, Avengers, or even the New Warriors, Robert Gill and Rachelle Rosenberg deliver on a monster setpiece to open Iceman #7 and cash in on the promise of last issue’s cliffhanger. Bobby displays so much swag, creativity, and leadership in this fight and basically wants to get it over with so he can Netflix and chill with his man. Gill also draws some close-ups of Angel because he is sexy and hell and also because he and Iceman have a close relationship. Later, Grace and Gill use him for innuendo and class consciousness purposes when his wingspan can barely fit in Iceman’s New York apartment. Tempting as it maybe to transform Iceman into a slice of life, romance book, Bobby Drake has been a hero since the 1960s (In comic book years.), and he’s not going to stop even if he goes solo for real this time.

It looks like the Champions team-up isn’t going to continue beyond Iceman #7 although Sina Grace did a nice job of using it to set up an L.A. setting, connect Bobby to non-X-Men related parts of the Marvel Universe, and also dig into why he acted like a macho wannabe flirt in older comics. Grace, Gill, and Rosenberg use Ben-Day dot flashbacks from Bronze Age comics to explore and critique Bobby’s toxic masculinity when instead of treating Black Widow like a powerful ally, he hit on her and was immediately cut down to size. However, he has learned his lesson over the years and is starting to come into his own as a gay man. And this whole freedom thing goes into overdrive towards the end of the issue. But not after he roasts each and every X-Man before movie night.

Iceman #7 is a real turning point issue for the series in both sexy and non-sexy ways as Bobby Drake shows that he can do both the self-realization and transforming his body into Godzilla ice shapes thing. Also, it’s nice to have the same artist on two (not so) straight issues.

 

Story: Sina Grace Art: Robert Gill Colors: Rachelle Rosenberg
Story: 8.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Marvel Legacy Week One Sells Out and Gets Second Printings

On the heels of Marvel Legacy #1 being the best-selling issue of 2017, Marvel is pleased to announce that all week one Legacy titles have sold out, and will immediately return for a second printing: Avengers #672, Iceman #6, Iron Fist #73, Jessica Jones #13, Royals #9, Spirits of Vengeance #1, Venom #155 and X-Men: Gold #13.

The 1 million BC Avengers in Marvel Legacy #1 were just the beginning – over the past few weeks, Marvel Legacy has pushed the Marvel Universe into a new and exciting direction with epic adventures, returning fan-favorites, and fresh story arcs from top creative teams.

Missed them the first time? Don’t miss your chance to get caught up on some of the most exciting titles when they return to comic shops this November!

AVENGERS 672 SECOND PRINTING (AUG178889) ROYALS #9 SECOND PRINTING (AUG179020)
Written by MARK WAID Written by AL EWING
Art by JESÚS SAIZ Art by JAVIER RODRIGUEZ
FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17 FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17
ICEMAN #6 SECOND PRINTING (AUG178890) SPIRITS OF VENGEANCE #1 SECOND PRINTING (AUG178893)
Written by SINA GRACE Written by VICTOR GISCHLER
Art by ROBERT GILL Art by DAVID BALDEON
FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17 FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17
IRON FIST #73 SECOND PRINTING (AUG178891) VENOM #155 SECOND PRINTING (AUG178894)
Written by ED BRISSON Written by MIKE COSTA
Art by MIKE PERKINS Art by MARK BAGLEY
FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17 FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17
JESSICA JONES #13 SECOND PRINTING (AUG178892) X-MEN: GOLD #13 SECOND PRINTING (AUG17885)
Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS Written by MARC GUGGENHEIM
Art by MICHAEL GAYDOS Art by MIKE MAYHEW
FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17 FOC – 10/16/17, On-Sale – 11/08/17

Marvel Legacy Recap: Avengers, Spirits of Vengeance, and More

Marvel Legacy is underway and we’re going to take a quick look at each first issue released to determine a few of things.

  1. If the issue is a good starting point.
  2. If the issue makes me want to come back for a second.
  3. How well the back-up story holds up

So, lets dive in to each issue and see!


Avengers #672 – (W) Mark Waid (A) Jesus Saiz – As far as a comic, this issue was not bad. You can read the full review. But, while the issue is entertaining to watch the Avengers and Champions team up, the threat itself doesn’t feel epic enough. A lot of focus is given to the characters, while the big picture lacks. Sure, there’s some cool use of powers to deal with the threat, but the threat itself feels like something we’ve seen before and isn’t all that memorable. This is a comic I’d like to read but not one that has me excited to see what comes next.

As far as being “new reader” friendly, the issue is good in that sense. It gives just enough to know who the characters are and why we should care.

The back-up comic is a good quick overview of the Avengers’ history (and in a way frames the comic better) and the art is decent, though not amazing.

Iceman #6 – (W) Sina Grace (A) Robert Gill – The Champions come together to mourn the loss of Black Widow and just decompress. This issue really focuses on the characters and gives us a great deal of info as to who they are and why we should care. Some characters get shortchanged when it comes to that, but overall it’s really good. If you like the “slice of life” mixed with superhero action, this comic has that and then some.

This one is very “new reader” friendly and you have to know very little going into the comic. Things are explained well and everything you need to know is in the comic.

The back-up material does a good job in catching readers up and there’s a lot to pack in. The art too is really good as well.

Read a review of the issue.

Iron First #73 – (W) Ed Brisson (A) Mike Perkins  – This issue is all set up and follows a hell of a lot of tropes. While it’s a good issue, I’m not quite sure if it’s one that really sucks me in to see what’s next.

The issue is mixed when it comes to being “new reader” friendly. There’s a lot that’s left hanging out there, like the dragon (never really explained) and Sabretooth’s history with Danny isn’t explained well enough either. Neither kill the issue, but it’s a gap.

The back-up is good in putting the key history in there, but there’s a lot that’s left out that shows some priorities. The art is really lacking though.

Jessica Jones #13 – (W) Brian Michael Bendis (A) Michael Gaydos – A really strong issue that brings back the Purple Man. There’s a solid sense of paranoia put in there and amazing art. The issue really makes Jessica the victim though and focuses on her PTSD. That might be off-putting for some, but it does match up to the television show’s first season really well.

This issue is not only “new reader” friendly but it’s also solid in matching up to the television show.

The back-up extra material does a good job in catching people up on Jessica’s life but the art is pretty lacking.

Royals #9 – (W) Al Ewing (A) Alvaro Lopez – Not new reader friendly at all. This comic relies heavily on the last eight issues and you’ll need to have read those to really understand what’s going on. The story itself is interesting but without knowing the backstory, it’s one that doesn’t hold interest.

The back-up is pretty good in filling that gap but since it comes after the main story it doesn’t help a ton. The art is good though and matches the main comic the most of those released this week.

Spirits of Vengeance #1 – (W) Victor Gischler (A) David Baldeon – Not bad, but also not good. The comic just doesn’t get to the meat of it all quick enough. Solid moments that don’t come together enough to make a solid comic. Not enough to really get me interested in a second issue which is a shame.

For new readers, the comic should be ok. You don’t need to know a ton and what you do is explained as the story goes on.

The back-up story again does a good job of catching readers up but again the art is lacking.

Venom #155 – (W) Mike Costa (A/CA) Mark Bagley, John Dell  – One of the strongest of the comics for the week. It runs you through the history of Venom and his motivations. The story is goofy but at least has something at the end to get me interested in seeing what’s next. This is a good intro comic.

The back-up again does a good job of running you through the history and the art is ok.

X-Men Gold #13 – (W) Marc Guggenheim (A) Mike Mayhew – Too much packed into the issue hurts it a lot. There’s not enough explained and it feels like you’re thrown into the deep end.

This one is not “new reader” friendly at all and there’s just major issues when it comes to that. Plus kicking off Legacy with a crossover doesn’t feel like the best of ideas.

The back-up again gives a good amount of history but the art is horrendous at times.

Read the full review of the issue.


While the comics aren’t bad this past week, at the same time few have me excited to see what’s next. While the back-up stories condense history they usually are accompanied with bad art. This is a mixed bag and doesn’t bode well for a first week.

Review: Iceman #6

Writer Sina Grace, new series artist Robert Gill (Who ups the beefcake level considerably), and colorist Rachelle Rosenberg give Bobby Drake a fresh start on the West Coast in Iceman #6 as he reunites with his former Champions teammates: Angel, Hercules, Darkstar, and Ghost Rider (The Johnny Blaze version) in L.A. They start by sharing memories about their fallen friend Black Widow (Who was brutally fridged in Secret Empire by HYDRA Cap.), but the story gets much lighter. The banter between the short-lived superhero teammates is pretty fun, and best of all, Iceman finally gets to go on a date and do gay things with a cute guy out West.

Iceman #6 is a little short on action with the bad guy being a Hollywood effects wannabe/single mom, who decides to make her big mark by building a Sentinel and wrecking the city for some reason or another. Her motivation is pretty weak, and she’s basically just there to set up a superhero team-up in the next issue and set up a funny joke mixing Iceman up with the Silver Surfer. (Because they both wear trunks and nothing else sometimes, I guess.) But that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Grace and Gill spend most of the issue establishing the bond between the once and future Champions and having Bobby flirt, dance, and yes, even make out with a guy he meets while waiting in line for a new pair of cool shoes. Judah uses even more ,and it’s nice to see someone finally show Bobby the ropes of being an out gay man with the painful coming out to his parents arc out of the way.

He does doing anything crazy or innovative with panel layouts, but Robert Gill brings a real energy and sexiness to his artwork in Iceman #6. My main problem with his art is that his civilian designs for Johnny Blaze and Angel are a little too similar, and I had to use context/comics backstory clues to realize that Bobby and Warren were having a heart to heart on the Hollywood sign, not Iceman and Ghost Rider. However, he more than redeems himself in the sequence where Bobby and Judah cut a rug on the dance floor that has a swirling energy and a blue from Rachelle Rosenberg that is part romantic, part “in da club”. Gill uses a couple inset panels to show off Bobby and Judah’s moves and flirting before zooming out for a big damn Hollywood kiss. He captures the fashion, fun, and friendship of my favorite gay bars and clubs, and some highlights are Hercules’ deep V and Ghost Rider trying to find parking for his bike next to some leather daddies. Grace’s writing digs into a nice vein of awkwardness, self-realization, and adrenaline that I definitely felt the first time I kissed a man  Yay for stubble on cheeks!

With the return of the Champions combined with Bobby going on its first date, Iceman #6 hits a nice sweet spot between Bronze Age era nostalgia and modern slice of life. Sina Grace writes the interactions between Bobby and the Champions like a college reunion (He even studied accounting in grad school during the original series.) with the memories of the past being the main conversation topic except for when he chats with Angel, who is like the good college friend you’ve stayed in touch with over the years. It’s also nice to see him go on a date and use his superhero buddies to impress his date while Robert Gill’s art is definitely more aesthetically pleasing than some of the previous visuals on Iceman.

Finally, the Iceman smooching in this issue is a great belated National Boyfriend Day present.

 Story: Sina Grace Art: Robert Gill Colors: Rachelle Rosenberg
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Iceman #5

“Oh no, love. You’re not alone. No matter what or who you’ve been… Give me your hands!”- “Rock ‘N’ Roll Suicide” by David Bowie

In Iceman #5, Bobby finally comes out as gay to his parents, and they don’t accept him unconditionally. It’s an issue that really hit home for me personally and is easily Sina Grace’s best writing on the series. The scenes where the Drakes ask their son insensitive, probing questions about his sexuality are more painful than any blow from the unstoppable, time displaced from the 1960s Juggernaut, who is this issue’s villain of the week. Artist Alessandro Vitti and colorist Rachelle Rosenberg draw a mano a mano battle between Iceman and Juggernaut that is juxtaposed with his coming out letter. These scenes show the cathartic nature of superhero comics for queer people, and their ability to make me escape from my issues with a tale of derring-do and overcoming seemingly unbeatable odds.

In previous issues,  I feel like Grace portrayed Bobby’s parents more sympathetically, but their insensitive, bigoted words towards him in Iceman #5 show why he didn’t come out to him earlier and wanted to do it via letter where he could filter and write out his thoughts in a more organized manner. Vitti draws them with big wrinkles and glaring, ugly expressions as they treat Bobby’s sexuality as hypothetical and even ask him questions about sex life. His mom even uses “mutie” and “queer” as slurs and blames his dad’s side of the family for passing these “genes” to him. Instead of accepting, she constantly talks about how he’s a disappointment, and Mr. Drake won’t even recognize him as their son anymore. Grace and Vitti defuse the tension a little bit with some Idie and Quentin Quire antics, but they get blocked off from the narrative by a literal wall of ice given a glistening sheen by Rosenberg. And Kitty Pryde shows she’s an amazing friend by giving Bobby the opportunity to cut loose against Juggernaut (He probably should have backup though.)

IcemanAngry

And after taking non-stop verbal body blows from his parents, a solo fight against Juggernaut is what Bobby (and the plot of Iceman #5) needs. When the battle begins, Vitti draws a craggier Iceman (Because he’s angry.), and Rosenberg emphasizes the red on his uniform shirt. The battle itself is a blockbuster one and extremely creative as Bobby doesn’t have to hold back against the Juggernaut, whose only motivation is to wreck stuff and kill the X-Men blue team, who brought him to present times from the 1960s.

The dad jokes are gone, and Vitti and Rosenberg replace with double page, shoujo manga-esque spreads of Bobby freezing the speed of light to hit the Juggernaut and then using his ability to change into a vapor to escape his clutches and finally put the kibosh on him. After these pages and a beautiful transformation, the fact that Iceman is an omega level mutant is at the forefront of his character and not just a trivia fact. As he mentions to his dad at the end of the issue, being honest about who he loves has helped him use his mutant powers more effectively. This is definitely true because Bobby does a lot of cool things this issue like impaling Juggernaut on an icicle and sending his ice golems to save civilians while he focuses on keeping Juggy occupied. Water is all around us, and in Bobby’s capable hands, it can be a powerful weapon. Vitti and Rosenberg get really creative with his powers in this issue, especially when he is about to beat the Juggernaut.

The bittersweet ending to Iceman #5 where Bobby and his dad have a polite chat about his letter, say they love each other, and reconcile in the snow rings true to my own experience as a queer man. My parents don’t approve of my sexuality, but they actually do still care about me, and we have a pretty good relationship. Personally, this makes me hurt a lot deeper than a simple Westboro Baptist Church type of hate because it’s infused with love.

Iceman #5 works as a comic because Sina Grace, Alessandro Vitti, and  holds a mirror to mine and other queer men’s experiences using mutant powers and superhero battles as big visual metaphors of both triumph and empowerment when Iceman defeats Juggernaut all by his lonesome and the feeling of being an outsider with his vapor abilities.

Iceman #5 is a powerful, cathartic end to the first arc of the comic and showed me that I’m not alone…

Story: Sina Grace Art: Alessandro Vitti Colors: Rachelle Rosenberg
Story: 9.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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