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Review: Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance #1

Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance

I honestly don’t remember much about Vengeance, the Ghost Rider also-ran. I remember he existed and the design but as a whole the specifics elude me. Thankfully, Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance catches readers up with a nice recap of what you need to know and why the character is important.

Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance lays things out in its title. It’s a one-shot that’s focused on the return of the character. Nothing more. Nothing less.

Michael Badilino, aka Vengeance, is in Hell, held prisoner for whatever reasons. With threats of torture and being forced to battle for his life, Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance is a prison break story.

Your enjoyment of the comic will really depend on how much you care about the Ghost Rider corner of the Marvel Universe or the character. This is a piece of whatever puzzle is being put together for all of that. It’s a jailbreak story with a beginning, middle, and end, but that’s about it. There’s little more than that and Badilino’s background. It’s a chapter of whatever is going on with Ghost Rider and the battle in Hell.

Howard Mackie’s story is fine. It doesn’t stand out in any way but also isn’t terrible either. It feels like a throwback to the comics of the 1990s when Vengeance was a thing. The dialogue is a bit cheesy and there’s a slight choppiness to the narrative. But, it’s a straightforward story. There’s little that’s surprising and a few things you just need to accept.

Javier Saltares handles the art. Saltares is joined by Marc Deering on ink, Arif Prianto on color, and Joe Sabino on lettering. The art too is a bit of a throwback though the opening has a bit of a modern feel to it. There’s not a whole lot that screams “Hell” to me beyond the demons on the page. It feels like a missed opportunity. There’s some details dropped in characters and panels as well that makes the art just ok.

There’s nothing bad about Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance but there’s also little that stands out. It’s a perfectly entertaining comic in a turn off your brain sort of way. The comic exists as part of the big picture plans for Ghost Rider and that corner of the Marvel Universe. It doesn’t really stand on its whole but it gets the motorcycle rolling for whatever is to come for Vengeance.

Story: Howard Mackie Art: Javier Saltares
Ink: Javier Saltares, Marc Deering Color: Arif Prianto Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 6.75 Art: 6.95 Overall: 6.85 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance #1

Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance #1

(W) Howard Mackie, Ed Brisson (A/CA) Javier Saltares
Rated T+
In Shops: Dec 30, 2020
SRP: $4.99

THE ONE YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR – THE RETURN OF VENGEANCE!

MICHAEL BADILINO was a bad dude in life… and that landed him in hell. But not just any old rung of hell, a layer so deep it’s reserved for those special enemies of hell – one where a former SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE may suffer for all eternity!

As LILITH’s gambit against JOHNNY BLAZE and MEPHISTO for the throne of hell heats up, you can bet other players will enter the arena… and Badilino will find a way to ride again as VENGEANCE!

Fan-favorite GHOST RIDER creators Howard Mackie and Javier Saltares return to the saga of the Spirits of Vengeance in an all-new tale as Vengeance brings his own brand of hellfire to the Marvel Universe!

Ghost Rider: Return of Vengeance #1

ComiXology Delivers 6 New Releases Including Daredevil, Wolverine, and Punisher vs. Bullseye

There are six new releases on comiXology today from Marvel and Harlequin. Marvel delivers classic stories from Daredevil, Wolverine, and Punisher vs. Bullseye. Check them all out now or the individual releases below.

Battle For Love

Written by Stephanie Howard
Art by Hiroko Miura
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When Shiona is reunited with her stepbrother, Jake, his scornful gaze brings back the pain of the past. Her mother had married into Jake’s family, and Shiona had always secretly been in love with him. But he still blames her for his brother’s death. Jake’s cold attitude toward Shiona shatters her, but his engagement brings forth an unexpected turn of events!

Battle For Love

Daredevil: Marvel Knights Collection Vol. 1

Written by David Mack, Jimmy Palmiotti, Joe Quesada, Kevin Smith
Art by Rob Haynes, Joe Quesada, Dave Ross
Cover by Joe Quesada
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Collects Daredevil (1998) #1-15.

Claiming her infant is humanity’s savior, a teenager entrusts her baby to Matt Murdock. Plus: The femme fatale called Echo sets her sights on Daredevil.

Daredevil: Marvel Knights Collection Vol. 1

Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine Vol. 2

Written by Chris Claremont, Erik Larsen, Marv Wolfman
Art by John Buscema, Klaus Janson, Erik Larsen, Joe Rubinstein
Cover by John Byrne
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Collects material from Marvel Comics Presents #39-50.

Like things as clear as black and white? You’re in luck — but Wolverine isn’t, as the mysterious Black Shadow/White Shadow uses his energy powers to double-team everyone’s favorite feral fighter! Then, Wolverine wanders into a costumed kidnapping scheme run by an old classmate of the web-slinger known as Spider-Man! And find out just how connected Wolverine is as we meet another mysterious marvel from his past!

Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine Vol. 2

Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine Vol. 3

Written by Michael Higgins, Rob Liefeld, Fabian Nicieza
Art by Dan Day, Chris Ivy, Rob Liefeld
Dave Ross, Joe Rubinstein
Cover by Dale Keown
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Collects material from Marvel Comics Presents #51-61.

A murderous mutant is loose, forcing Wolverine to face a feral former teammate whose descent into death could be his own! Plus: the clawed Canadian gets another rematch with the Incredible Hulk! Featuring the return of a long-forgotten X-Man!

Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine Vol. 3

Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine Vol. 4

Written by Howard Mackie, Dwight Zimmerman
Art by Harry Candelario, Paul Ryan, Mark Texeira
Cover by Rob Liefeld
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Collects material from Marvel Comics Presents #62-71.

The mayhem-loving mutant faces occult intrigue against Abdul Alhazred, while fallout from the Acts of Vengeance brings him face to facelessness with the ninjas of Deathwatch! Wolverine does it again, and he does it the best! Guest-starring Ghost Rider!

Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine Vol. 4

Punisher vs. Bullseye

Written by Daniel Way
Art by Steve Dillon
Cover by Mike Deodato Jr.
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Collects Punisher vs Bullseye #1-5.

Alphonse Patrillo’s a rare breed: a mob boss who looked down the barrel of the Punisher’s rifle and lived to tell about it. Ever since that day, he’s taken pains – great pains – to stay under the Punisher’s radar while he schemed his revenge. Now, Uncle Fonzie has got a plan: He’s going to fight fire with fire. Who do you hire to take out a relentless psychopath like the Punisher? An even more relentless psychopath. And this guy, well, let’s just say he never misses.

Punisher vs. Bullseye

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Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Howard Mackie, Ron Marz, Bob McLeod, David Michelinie, Jerry Ordway, Mike Royer, Bob Schreck, and Bob Wiacek Head to Baltimore Comic Con

The Baltimore Comic-Con returns to the Inner Harbor’s Baltimore Convention Center on October 18-20, 2019. The Baltimore Comic-Con is excited to announce the additions of comics luminaries Howard Mackie, Ron Marz, Bob McLeod, David Michelinie, Jerry Ordway, Mike Royer, Bob Schreck, and Bob Wiacek to the 2019 event. Tickets are available now.

Howard Mackie first gained attention as a writer in 1990, launching a new Ghost Rider title for Marvel, co-creating Danny Ketch as the new host of the Ghost Rider. He wrote Ghost Rider / Wolverine / Punisher: Hearts of Darkness and Ghost Rider / Wolverine / Punisher: The Dark Design, and took over writing duties on Web of Spider-Man. He would remain on various Spider-Man titles through the Clone Saga. In January 1999, Mackie became writer on relaunches of Amazing Spider-Man and Peter Parker: Spider-Manseries. Mackie wrote for the X-Men line, including X-Factor and Mutant X. He also wrote several mini-series featuring Gambit, Wolverine, and Rogue. Mackie co-wrote the six-issue Spider-Man: Clone Saga miniseries, based on Mackie’s original notes for the 1990s crossover. At DC Comics, Mackie wrote The Ravagers as part of the “Second Wave” of The New 52. Of late, you can find Howard working for Zenescope Entertainment, writing titles such as Grimm Tales of TerrorJasmine: Crown of Kings, and Robyn Hood: Outlaw.

Ron Marz has been writing comics for more than two decades, starting his career with a lengthy run on Silver Surfer for Marvel. Since then, he has worked for virtually every major publisher and compiled a long list of credits, including stints on Green Lantern for DC, Star Wars and Conan for Dark Horse, Witchblade for Top Cow, and as a staff writer for CrossGen Comics. Among Marz’s recent work is the rejuvenation of the Top Cow publishing line, including his historic run on Witchblade and the launch of the acclaimed event series Artifacts. He also currently writes the Skylanders series for IDW, John Carter: Warlord of Mars for Dynamite Entertainment, and The Protectors from Athlitacomics, working with NFL player Israel Idonije to develop and launch the concept. 

Marz’s creator-owned series include the all-ages tale Dragon Prince at Top Cow, the historical adventure Samurai: Heaven and Earth, the science-fiction story Pantheon Cityat Dark Horse, and the vampire tale Shinku at Image. Marz and acclaimed artist Stjepan Sejic also have teamed for Ravine, a series of creator-owned fantasy graphic novels from Top Cow/Image. In addition to his comics credits, Marz has worked in the video-game industry on a number of Activison titles, including the Skylanders franchise, and writes a regular column for Comic Book Resources, the #1 comics-related website.

Bob McLeod is best known for co-creating and illustrating The New Mutants for Marvel Comics. He began his career with Marvel’s Crazy magazine, penciling and inking movie and TV satires and the Teen Hulk strip. He has penciled or inked all the major characters for Marvel and DC, including Spider-Man(most notably Kraven’s Last Hunt), The X-MenSupermanBatmanWonder WomanGI JoeStar WarsThe HulkConan, and many more. Bob also wrote and illustrated a children’s alphabet book, Superhero ABC, published by HarperCollins, which received starred reviews. He edited and wrote articles for Twomorrows’ Rough Stuff magazine and taught art at the Pennsylvania College of Art & Design for many years. He’s currently doing occasional variant covers for Marvel and commissions for his fans, along with occasional freelance jobs and personal projects. His web site is www.bobmcleod.com

David Michelinie (appearing Saturday and Sunday only, courtesy of The Living Corpse) has been a professional writer for over 45 years. He has written more than 600 comic book stories (Iron ManAmazing Spider-ManAvengers, etc.) in which he created or co-created numerous characters (Venom, James “Rhodey” Rhodes, Scott Lang) that have been featured in major motion pictures. 

His comic book efforts have spanned genres from westerns to war to horror to super-hero. In addition to comics work, David has published two novels, has had short stories published in anthologies (Werewolves: Dark Moon Rising) and periodicals (Spider-Man Magazine), and has written scripts for the Nicktoons animated series, Iron Man Armored Adventures. His comic book biography of Mother Teresa won the Catholic Book Award for Best Children’s Book, and his work on the acclaimed Iron Man “Demon In A Bottle” saga was awarded a Certificate Of Merit from a prestigious anti-alcoholism foundation. His most recent work has been in the field of independent comics, and includes The Living Corpse: The Hexx Files.

After an initial foray into fanzines, Jerry Ordway found work at DC Comics as a result of a talent search at the 1980 Chicago Comicon, starting on anthology titles such as Mystery in Space and Weird War Tales. An artist in his own right, he is renowned for his inking work at DC Comics, including the industry-changing Crisis on Infinite EarthsZero Hour: Crisis in Time, and Countdown, as well as runs on SupermanWonder Woman, and JLA, as well as writing and painting The Power of Shazam! OGN and writing the monthly series that followed.

Drawn to Southern California, spring 1965, by the lure of a career in Comic Art, Mike Royer spent his first 14 years in comic books, comic strips, and TV animation. Beginning as Russ Manning’s assistant on Magnus, Robot Fighter and Tarzan comic books and then inking and penciling for Western Publishing (Gold Key). His drawing assignments were on TarzanSpace Ghost, coloring books, puzzles, and more for Western, and doing layout on network animation series like Spider-Man. At Gold Key, he wrote/adapted and drew Speed BuggyButch Cassidy and the Sundance KidsTarzan, and Magnus, and designed and executed covers for Hanna-Barbera TV Adventure Heroes, etc. Mike contributed to James Warren’s CreepyEerie, and Vampirella magazines, and began drawing the comic panel Crusin’ record album covers (over 2 dozen to date), many of which he’s scripted. For East Coast firms, he is best known to comic fans for his decade as letterer/inker for legendary Jack Kirby at National and then Marvel. From late spring 1979, Mike spent the next 14 years on staff with the Walt Disney Company in the creative department of their Consumer Product/Licensing division, addressing the areas of book publishing, comic books and strips, and all forms of theme park and licensed merchandise as a character artist/product designer, performing as idea man, concept and final line artist, and sometime inker. At Disney, Mike designed and art directed the Dick Tracy and 3-D Rocketeer comic book Music Company read-alongs. He created the “new look” that launched the massive Winnie the Pooh licensing program in late 1993. Featured in a 43-minute video (How To Draw Pooh) sent to over 40 licensees, Mike takes no small amount of pride in the fact that Pooh soon (and still) outsold Mickey Mouse worldwide. In June 1993, Mike left his staff position to spend the next 7 years full-time freelancing for The Disney Store’s creative group, becoming their “Main Pooh Man” and creating 3-D products utilizing Disney characters. Since the spring of 2000, Mike has functioned as an Art service, doing pencil work on a wide variety of projects, including creating character Orthographic Turns and environment “floor plans” for computer game animators, Digimon products, on-screen icons for Fox Family Channel and Fox Kids Network, Reader Rabbit workbooks, Rescue Heroes toy packaging, and more. Spring 2001 found Mike and Laurie, his lovely wife and concept collaborator, returning to his birth state, Oregon, settling in Medford, and in the process returned to his career roots. And in the last few years, he’s found time to ink such luminaries as Steve Rude and Eric Larsen, to name a couple. Mike continues to create Disney character art for limited edition collector pin sets and does “recreations”. He strongly believes that his passion, attention to detail and accuracy, and his commitment to integrity will keep him at the board for a long time to come.

Bob Schreck is an award-winning editor who has worked in comics since 1975. His publishing career began at Comico in 1985. By 1991, he joined Dark Horse and was the editor of creator-owned titles and the Legend line, where he shepherded Frank Miller’s Sin City and Dark Horse Presents, among many others. In 1997, along with Joe Nozemack, he launched Oni Press, best known for Kevin Smith’s Clerks comics.

In 1999, Schreck joined DC Comics, becoming Group Editor of the Batman franchise. He shepherded projects including DK2Batman: HushSweet ToothBatman: Year 100Daytripper, and Green Arrow. After working briefly at IDW, he landed at Legendary Films as Senior VP-Editor-in-Chief. He has served as the editor for such talents as Neil Gaiman, Harlan Ellison, Bernie Wrightson, Fiona Staples, Frank Miller, Jeff Lemire, Guillermo del Toro, Lynn Varley, Paul Pope, Len Wein, Amy Reeder, Dave Gibbons, Scott Morse, Grant Morrison, and many others. Currently, Schreck is semi-retired, doing freelance editing and consulting and living in Oregon with his husband, Randy, and their dog, Bandit.

Bob Wiacek has worked with many great talents such as Stan Lee, Steve Ditko, Gene Colan, John and Sal Buscema, Walter Simonson, Frank Miller, Barry Windsor-Smith, George Perez, Jerry Ordway, Paul Smith, Dave Cockrum, John Byrne, Don Heck, Ron Garney, June Brigman, Colleen Doran, plus many others. He has inked Mike Grell on The Legion of Super Heroes #220 and Al Milgrom on Marvel Presents #7-The Guardians of the Galaxy for Marvel. From that time on, he has inked every major title for Marvel, including The X-MenSpider-ManThorIron ManCaptain AmericaHulkShe-HulkMan-ThingStar WarsSilver Surfer, and Fantastic Four just to name a few. At DC, he worked on SupermanBatmanGreen LanternBrave and the BoldThe RayBatman FamilyJustice SocietyShazam, and Challengers of the Unknown, which is a small sampling as well.

As far as independent publishers, he did work for Dark Horse, Image, Relium Media, Archie, and Valiant, where he worked on Archer and ArmstrongBloodshot, and Solar. He has inked noteworthy issues in titles including Uncanny X-MenX-FactorStar WarsIron ManBatman, and Bloodshot. On the Iron Man 2020 project, he co-plotted with Walter Simonson and penciled and inked the book (with an able assist from Will Rosado). Of late, Wiacek has helped out inking All New Wolverine and a JLA General Mills comic, which was available in different cereal boxes. He has also inked Badger #1 for First Comics, Stars End #2 from Insane Comics, pencilled and inked the cover to ZaZa the Mystic, and will be working on an Indie project soon with Ron Wilson and Arvell Jones. Outside of comics, he starred in a commercial with rap group G-Unit in 2003, and has a small part in the independent film Manos: The Rise of Torgo, for which he did the poster.


In addition to on-site CGC grading, this year’s confirmed guests for the show include: Neal Adams (Detective Comics), Arantza (fantasy artist), Art Way Alliance, Brian Azzarello (Batman: Damned), Marty Baumann (Disney/Pixar), Carolyn Belefski (Curls), Ziggy Blumenthal (Operation Pajama Pants), Harold Buchholz (MST3K), Mark Buckingham (Justice League Dark), Cullen Bunn (Harrow County, courtesy of AfterShock Comics), Greg Burnham (Tuskegee Heirs), Jim Calafiore (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), Joe Carabeo (The Legettes), Richard Case (Doom Patrol), Christa Cassano (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Freshman Force), Castillo Studios, Jacob Chabot (Ziggy Pig – Silly Seal Comics), Howard Chaykin (Hey Kids! Comics!), Frank Cho (Harley Quinn), Amy Chu (KISS: The End), Matthew oClark (Injustice: Ground Zero), Steve Conley (The Middle Age), Steve Conte (Action Figure Kingdom), Katie Cook (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic), Jamie Cosley (Star Wars Insider), Kristina Deak-Linsner (Vampirella: Roses for the Dead), The Deans Family (La Moo Du Chocolat: A Shakes Adventure), Steve Ellis (The Only Living Girl), Tod Emko and Piggy (A Piggy’s Tale), Garth Ennis (The Boys, Friday and Saturday only), Rob Feldman (Cyko KO), Chris Flick (Capes & Babes), LJ and Kayla Fowlkes (The Adventures of CHIBIWONGTONG), Shea Fontana (DC SuperHero Girls), Ramona Fradon (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), Franco (Superman of Smallville), Julie Fujii Sakai (Usagi Yojimbo: The Hidden), John Gallagher (Max Meow), David Gallaher (The Only Living Girl), SL Gallant (Magic: The Gathering: Chandra – Tales of Alara), Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez (DC Nation), Mitch Gerads (Mr. Miracle), Gerhard (Cerberus the Aardvark), Chris Giarrusso (Hashtag: Danger), Jimmy Gownley (Disney Zootopia: School Days), Garth Graham (Star Power), John Patrick Green (Kim Possible Adventures), Dawn Griffin (Zorphbert & Fred), Juanjo Guarnido (Blacksad),  Laura Lee Gulledge (Will & Whit), Bob Hall (West Coast Avengers), Cully Hamner (Batman Beyond), N. Steven Harris (Michael Cray), Dean Haspiel (Bloodshot Rising Spirit), Greg Hildebrandt (Old Man Logan), Javon and Tarik Holmes (The Adventuers of Waffle Boy), Adam Hughes (Superman), Jamal Igle (Wrong Earth), Klaus Janson (New Challengers), Justin Jordan (Reaver), Kata Kane (G.F.F.s Ghost Friends Forever), Chris Kemple (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), Matt Kindt (X-O Manowar), Sharlene Kindt (Dept. H), Tom King (Batman), Greg Land (Hulkverines, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Jim Lee (Batman: Hush, Saturday only), Jeff Lemire (Black Hammer), Joseph Michael Linsner (Red Sonja), Howard Mackie (Ghost Rider), Mike Manley (Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Comic), Chris Mariano (Claire Lost Her Bear at the World’s Fair), Mark Mariano (Puddleton Farm: Ewing! What Are You Doing?), Ron Marz (Turok), Xavier McLaren (The Bubbler), John McCrea (Hitman, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Bob McLeod (New Mutants), Carla Speed McNeil (Twisted Romance), Pop Mhan (Raven, Daughter of Darkness), David Michelinie (Amazing Spider-Man, Saturday and Sunday only, courtesy of The Living Corpse), Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez (Ricanstruction: Reminiscing & Rebuilding Puerto Rico), Mark Morales (Justice League), Jamar Nicholas (Leon: Protector of the Playground), Kevin Nowlan (Black Widow, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Jerry Ordway (Archie Meets Batman ’66), Rachel Ordway (FTL, Y’all!), Greg Pak (Star Wars), Dan Parent (Archie: The Married Life – 10th Anniversary), Paul Pelletier (Aquaman/Jabberjaw Special), Mike Perkins (Swamp Thing), David Petersen (Mouse Guard), Mark Poulton (Koni Waves), Andy Price (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic), Livio Ramondelli (Transformers), Ron Randall (Trekker), Tom Raney (Dog Days of Summer), Afua Richardson (Run), Rafer Roberts (Grumble), Don Rosa (The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck), Craig Rousseau (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Dimension X), Mike Royer (New Gods), Arsia Rozegar (Man Plus), Stan Sakai (Usagi Yojimbo), Stuart Sayger (KISS: The End), Bob Schreck (Batman: Hush), Greg Schigiel (Pix: One Weirdest Weekend), Erica Schultz (Xena: Warrior Princess), Bart Sears (Turok), Jeff Shultz (Archie Jumbo Comics Digest), Bill Sienkiewicz (New Mutants: War Children), Louise Simonson (Death of Superman), Walter Simonson (Ragnarok), Andy Smith (Demi-God), Brian “Smitty” Smith (The Stuff of Legend), John K. Snyder III (Killers), Allison Sohn (The Art of Red Sonja, Volume 2), Charles Soule (Curse Words), Brian Stelfreeze (Rise of the Black Panther), Jim Steranko (Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.), Karl Story (Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Han Solo), William Stout (Fantastic Worlds – The Art of William Stout), Ty Templeton (Marvel Super-Hero Adventures, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Michael Terracciano (Star Power), Billy Tucci (Shi), Gus Vazquez (Big Hero 6), Emilio Velez Jr. (The Dodgeball Teens), Robert Venditti (Hawkman), Doug Wagner (The Hard Place), Mark Waid (Avengers: No Road Home), Adam Wallenta (Punk Taco), Adam Warren (Empowered And Sistah Spooky’s High School Hell), Todd Webb (Mr. Toast Comics), Lee Weeks (Batman), Bob Wiacek (Iron Man), Marcus Williams (Tuskegee Heirs), Javier Cruz Winnik (Puerto Rico Strong), Marv Wolfman (Raven: Daughter of Darkness, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Rich Woodall (Electric Black), John Workman (Riverdale), Kelly Yates (Torchwood), and Thom Zahler (Star Trek: Waypoint Special 2019).

Review: Robyn Hood: Outlaw #2

Robyn Hood: Outlaw #2

As someone who loves stories, I remember watching a television show on PBS called American Family. It starred many of my favorite actors including Edward James Olmos, Constance Marie, and Esai Morales. The plot revolved head of the household Jess Gonzalez, an average father who’s forced to fight everyday troubles following the death of his loving wife Berta. Their beloved daughter Nina has recently graduated from law school and decides to work for Legal Services on behalf of immigrant rights, even though Jess does not agree with her decision. The rest of the Gonzalez family just try to go with the flow but they find their own problems down the road. Sadly, it lasted only two seasons but it still was one of the best shows that represented Latinos at the time.

One of the burgeoning actors to emerge from the show was Kate del Castillo. She played a classical dancer who falls in love with Esai Morales’s character. She would go on to become one of the biggest stars from the show even starring in two different programs for Netflix, one of them being Ingobernable. In the second issue of Robyn Hood: Outlaw, we find our hero looking for shelter much like Del Castillo’ character did in that Netflix show.

In Robyn Hood: Outlaw #2, we find Robyn escaping police capture with the help of a new allie, whose powers are still a mystery to herself and Locksley. Robyn eventually catches up with Gengrich who is laid up in the hospital, where we find she also has been poisoned, confirming Robyn’s belief that this was a power grab. Soon the police find her, and she must find refuge in order to give her enough time to figure who is trying to frame her. By issue’s end, her new ally introduces her to the Underground where it seems it will change her world.

Overall, another action-packed issue which delves even deeper into Robyn’s world, one where at every turn it might be your last. The story by Howard Mackie is well developed and engaging. The art by Juan Rodriguez is gorgeous. Altogether, an interesting issue which should recruit more fans to this book.

Story: Howard Mackie Art: Juan Rodriguez
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Robyn Hood: Outlaw #1

Robyn Hood: Outlaw #1

When it comes to “friends,” everyone’s definition is different. People tend to think of friends as people they have known since childhood. Some people regard family members as friends just based on shared experiences and general likeability. In this age of social media the definition has become blurred as the connections we make on sites like Facebook and Instagram can be misconstrued as vehicles for empty adoration.

The measure of true kinship, is what you would do for one another. The bonds I made in the military have lasted this long not only because of shared experiences but the implicit trust we have in each other from our training. It is even more difficult, to have each other’s back, when it comes at your own detriment. In the first issue of Robyn Hood Outlaw our titular hero finds out what happens when helping a friend makes you public enemy number one.

We find Robyn Locksley returning home to New York City in her cozy manor situated in Manhattan, when she notices a broken door. Who she finds is her friend, Gengrich, the NYPD Commissioner who walked into an ambush, one that leaves her close to dead and the rest of the NYPD looking at Robyn as the main suspect for her death? Soon a fugitive hunt ensues, which leads to every police officer looking for Robyn ad a bloody firefight between her and the police.

Overall, an action-packed debut issue which mashes on the gas and leaves the reader almost breathless. The story by Howard Mackie is fun, tense, and densely written. The art by Babisu Kourtis and Juan M. Rodriguez is beautiful and vivid. Altogether, a story that feels like a cinematic action thriller, one that will keep readers coming back.

Story: Howard Mackie Art: Babisu Kourtis Color: Juan M. Rodriguez
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Advance Review: Robyn Hood: Outlaw #1

Robyn Hood: Outlaw #1

When it comes to “friends,” everyone’s definition is different. People tend to think of friends as people they have known since childhood. Some people regard family members as friends just based on shared experiences and general likeability. In this age of social media the definition has become blurred as the connections we make on sites like Facebook and Instagram can be misconstrued as vehicles for empty adoration.

The measure of true kinship, is what you would do for one another. The bonds I made in the military have lasted this long not only because of shared experiences but the implicit trust we have in each other from our training. It is even more difficult, to have each other’s back, when it comes at your own detriment. In the first issue of Robyn Hood Outlaw our titular hero finds out what happens when helping a friend makes you public enemy number one.

We find Robyn Locksley returning home to New York City in her cozy manor situated in Manhattan, when she notices a broken door. Who she finds is her friend, Gengrich, the NYPD Commissioner who walked into an ambush, one that leaves her close to dead and the rest of the NYPD looking at Robyn as the main suspect for her death? Soon a fugitive hunt ensues, which leads to every police officer looking for Robyn ad a bloody firefight between her and the police.

Overall, an action-packed debut issue which mashes on the gas and leaves the reader almost breathless. The story by Howard Mackie is fun, tense, and densely written. The art by Babisu Kourtis and Juan M. Rodriguez is beautiful and vivid. Altogether, a story that feels like a cinematic action thriller, one that will keep readers coming back.

Story: Howard Mackie Art: Babisu Kourtis Color: Juan M. Rodriguez
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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