Tag Archives: geoff johns

Nuclear Family banner ad

Stargirl Heads on Spring Break in May with Geoff Johns and Todd Nauck and the Seven Soldiers of Victory

After months and months of fighting crime and handling universe-threatening enemies, even superheroes need a springtime vacation. But thanks to award-winning writer Geoff Johns and artist Todd Nauck, there’s no Cancun, Miami, or South Padre Island on Stargirl’s itinerary in this 48-page one-shot, on sale May 4!

Courtney Whitmore’s spring break plans aren’t like your average high schooler’s. Instead of hanging out with friends, she’s heading out on an adventure with her stepfather, Pat Dugan, a.k.a. S.T.R.I.P.E., and teaming up with his former team, the Seven Soldiers of Victory! The soldiers are forced to reunite again to unearth the secret eighth soldier of victory, but what other secrets lay buried, and what does it all mean for Courtney’s future as Stargirl?

Anybody can hang out at the beach and party, but for fans of Stargirl, Golden Age superheroes, and fast-paced fun and adventure, the Stargirl Spring Break Special is a must-read! The book arrives at comic book stores and participating digital retailers on May 4 for $5.99. The physical version also features a card stock variant cover by Mike McKone for $6.99.

Stargirl Spring Break Special

DC Celebrates John Stewart’s Legacy with a Commemorative Hardcover Collection

As DC’s first Black Super Hero, and since his first appearance on the cover and in the pages of Green Lantern #87 on October 28, 1971, John Stewart has worn the ring of the Green Lantern Corps with honor, dignity, and unparalleled courage. On June 22, 2021, DC recognizes this trailblazer with a hardcover collection of his greatest adventures!

Green Lantern: John Stewart – A Celebration of 50 Years is a 368-page collection of the ring-bearer’s most memorable adventures, both earthbound and spacefaring. From his first appearance in the legendary Denny O’Neil/Neal Adams Green Lantern run, to taking over from Hal Jordan as Earth’s Green Lantern, to calling the shots in the latest incarnation of the Justice League, some of the greatest John Stewart stories in DC history are in this collection. Storytellers include Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams, Len Wein, Geoff Johns, Judd Winick, Dale Eaglesham, Ed Benes, and many others.

Featuring a stunning cover by Jim Lee and Scott Williams, this $39.99 hardcover collects Green Lantern Vol. 2 #87, #182, and #185, Green Lantern Vol. 3 #74 and #156, Green Lantern Vol. 4 #49, Justice League Vol. 4 #40, and Justice League of America #110. This collection also contains brand-new essays from John Stewart co-creator Neal Adams, acclaimed screenwriters John Ridley and Geoff Johns, and the voice of John Stewart from the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated TV shows, actor Phil LaMarr! The book arrives in comic book stores and on participating digital platforms on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Green Lantern: John Stewart – A Celebration of 50 Years

Around the Tubes

All About Me

It was a relatively quiet day yesterday as far as comic news but we’ve still got some for you to start your day!

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: Grab a slice of ALL ABOUT ME – Free comics!

The Beat – The Beat’s 2021 Creator Survey Part 4: the year we really missed conventions – More thoughts from the industry.

Variety – Geoff Johns Still Working With WarnerMedia, Despite Ray Fisher’s Claim Writer Is Leaving Studio – ….

Movie Review: Wonder Woman 1984 Delivers Throwback Fun

Wonder Woman 1984

The much delayed and anticipated Wonder Woman 1984 has finally been released in an unprecedented roll of the dice and experiment by Warner Bros. and its parent company AT&T. Released on HBO Max and in theaters, the film has pivoted a few times due to the current pandemic and shifting needs of consumers. Taking advantage of my big-screen television and surround sound, and not wanting to risk COVID, I took advantage of my HBO Max subscription to watch the film and in doing so, I felt transported back decades to the early years of comic film adaptations. That’s both a good and bad thing in the end. But, the end result is a film that’ll be polarizing and over years most likely dissected, analyzed, and opinion will shift for the positive.

Shifting the setting decades from the original, Wonder Woman is now in 1984 living her dual life. Longing for the return of her Steve Trevor, she’s been lonely and somewhat isolated. Enter the dreamstone, a MacGuffin that can make wishes come true. A failed businessman, Maxwell Lord, also wants the statue in hopes that he’ll be able to turn around his ventures and become a worldwide business dynamo. What results is a film that examines the 80s while also upending superhero movies in many ways.

Directed by the returning Patty Jenkins, Wonder Woman 1984 features a story by Jenkins and Geoff Johns with a screenplay by Jenkins, Johns, and Dave Callaham. The story and direction have their bumps but overall the film feels like a throwback to earlier years of superhero films both in tone and look. This isn’t a film filled with cynicism and negativity. Instead, it’s a story about hope, love, and a positive future. It’s bright at times and wears its pacifist leanings on its armored sleeve.

The biggest break from other superhero films is the lack of a villain with a motivation to cause harm. Played by Pedro Pascal, Maxwell Lord is Donald Trump mixed with 1980s television hucksters. It’s established early Lord is a fraud attempting to make money through a pyramid scheme. He wants a successful business not to rule anything and we see that through his actions.

In the end, the issue presented is desires uncontrolled. Lord’s plan spirals out of control putting the world on the brink of nuclear war. In that way, we get a very different story from DC and Marvel films of the past. This isn’t a nefarious plan so much as a mistake. It’s a scam that gets out of control and results in unintended consequences.

Jenkins attempts to have fun with that spiraling out of control world as things amp up slowly and then the avalanche. Lord wants more and uses his newfound powers in an attempt to enrich himself and at the same time also create some stability… which only creates more instability. We’ve seen a similar plot in Bruce Almighty. While that film stayed isolated to Buffalo, this takes it to a global scale.

The team slowly builds Lords out of control failure from his empty office, to the Middle East, to the White House, and then beyond. It’s a ramping up of an out of control power and a man desperate to figure out what to do next. He easily could have just made himself the ruler of the world but he doesn’t. He wants to be “the” businessman.

Jenkins attempts to bring an 80s vision to the film’s 1980s setting. That results in a mixed result. The tone of the film has much more in common with Richard Donner‘s Superman than it does with anything post-2000, the “modern superhero film era”. Its colors, lighting, and overall attitude are one of positivity. It has a light tone never taking itself too seriously and playing loose with the logic of the story. We’re treated to a finale that breaks from the traditional punching that crescendoes most comic films. It puts an exclamation point that the film attempts to do something different.

But what the film really does is remove itself from the meta-cinematic universe we come to expect. Yes, the film has the return of Steve Trevor from the first story but it has little direct impact on other DC films nor does it set up or continue a meta story that involves 20 other films. It’s a two-issue story arc giving us breaks between drawn-out “events”. It’s supposed to be a breezy popcorn film focused on fun and it generally succeeds.

The film absolutely has issues with its story. Trevor’s return has a lingering of rape due to how it’s done. Kristen Wiig‘s Barbara Minerva/Cheetah is underused. Some of the film could have been tightened up in the details. The film is loose with some fat to it. Minor changes would have made a leaner and tighter film. Special effects at times are rough and some fight sequences feel a bit uninspired. But, every comic film released has had problems none are perfect and there are modern releases that are in a far rougher shape than this.

The actors all bring some interesting aspects to the film. Gal Gadot is supposed to be front and center and while she plays alone very well, she doesn’t quite have the draw power she had in the first film. That’s partially because everyone else is so over the top in their performances that her Diana/Wonder Woman comes off as too serious and dour at times.

Returning is Chris Pine as Steve Trevor. Pine has the most fun of the actors continually being excited about the world he’s returned to. The joke happens over and over but Pine’s delivery never gets old and through him, the film gets to poke a lot of fun at the time period. Pine is our time capsule reminding us of the fashion, dances, and innovations of the decade.

Joining Gadot and Pine are Kristen Wiig as Barbara Minerva and Pedro Pascal as Maxwell Lord, the two “villains” of the film. I put that word in quotations because neither is truly evil.

Wiig plays the bookwormish Minerva who also works in the museum with Gadot’s Diana. In Diana she sees someone she inspires to be and her wish to do so brings unintended consequences. Wiig does a fantastic job of evolving from one thing to the other playing a convincing flower blooming. She does the stumbling nerd well and then the confident woman everyone wants to be around. There’s a lot of 80s John Hughes in the performance and it captures the decade well.

Pedro Pascal puts in an over the top performance tapping so much of what was wrong the decade. His scheming Lord is the insecure loser and con-artist we knew so many of the titans of the time were. Donald Trump, televangelists, late-night infomercials, Lord is all of these things in a bad wig. He’s the embodiment of everything wrong during that time period and does it with a delivery that emphasizes the slime. But, he also gives us a villain who isn’t so much one and as we learn someone the audience can relate to more than they want to admit.

Wonder Woman 1984 feels like the enjoyment will be directly inversed to how cynical one is. The more you are, the less you’ll like it. It’s a film that doesn’t take itself seriously and just roles with its ideas. The action sequences are enjoyable, performances a bit over the top, and a story that you just roll with. This is a popcorn film that wants you to not think and just go for the ride. It’s comic book escapism that takes its tone and look from comics delivering popcorn digital enjoyment.

Overall Rating: 8.0

Infinite Frontier Reveals the Next Phase of the DC Universe

The DC Universe enters its next phase this March with the release of Infinite Frontier #0, a 64-page one-shot that sets the table for new tales, talent, and characters for 2021 and beyond.

As Dark Nights: Death Metal exposes our heroes to the Multiverse’s darkest threats and DC’s Future State event provides a glimpse into possible futures of the DC Universe, this blockbuster one-shot propels our heroes into the current day and a world full of endless possibilities.

Featuring a dynamic primary cover by Dan Jurgens and Mikel Janín and an equally breathtaking card stock variant cover by John Timms, these stories will be delivered by some of the best talent in comics, including (among others):

  • Joshua Williamson, Scott Snyder, and James Tynion IV with John Timms
  • Brian Michael Bendis and David Marquez
  • Becky Cloonan and Michael W. Conrad with Alitha Martinez
  • Geoff Johns and Todd Nauck
  • Joshua Williamson and Alex Maleev
  • James Tynion IV and Jorge Jiménez
  • Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Jamal Igle

Infinite Frontier #0 will also serves as a primer and introduction for new can’t-miss series and story lines continuing throughout 2021:

  • An unthinkable, unexpected attack by the Joker makes him the target of a worldwide dragnet with ex-cop Jim Gordon in hot pursuit in the ongoing series The Joker by James Tynion IV and Guillem March
  • Spinning out of her breakout appearances in Future State: Wonder Woman and Future State: Superman/Wonder Woman, a young Yara Flor begins the search for her destiny and connection to the Amazons
  • It’s orientation day at Titans Tower as Tim Sheridan and Rafa Sandoval introduce a new group of teen heroes (including the future Red X) to the original New Teen Titans, setting the table for the duo’s Teen Titans Academy series in March
  • The adventures of the Justice League continue (beginning with Justice League #59), now written by Brian Michael Bendis with artist David Marquez, with new JL members, including Black Adam, Hippolyta, and Naomi
  • Wonder Woman ventures into the “godsphere,” creating an exciting new storyline by Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad and Travis Moore, continuing in March’s Wonder Woman #770
  • Award-winning writer Geoff Johns and Todd Nauck tell an all-new Stargirl story

For fans wanting a gateway into the next great era of storytelling, this 64-page oversize one-shot is a guaranteed must-have for March pull lists. Priced at $5.99 for the main cover version and $6.99 for the card stock variant, this book will be available at all comic book stores and participating digital retailers on Tuesday, March 2, 2021.

Geoff Johns and Gary Frank Return to Batman: Earth One

Batman: Earth One Vol. 3

DC has announced the release date for Batman: Earth One Vol. 3. The graphic novel will be released on June 8, 2021. Geoff Johns returns to the standalone graphic novel series and joining him is Gary Frank, Jon Sibal, and Brad Anderson. In the third volume of the series, a mysteriously well-armed gang of thieves thrusts Gotham City into a state of fear. The criminals are highly organized and locked and loaded with the latest in military-grade weapons: flame-throwers, grenade-launchers, and even tanks.

And this gang claims it is funded by none other than former district attorney Harvey Dent. But Harvey Dent is dead…isn’t he?

Balancing his two lives, Bruce Wayne must find the truth with the help of his growing network of agents, including Alfred, Jim Gordon, Waylon “Killer Croc” Jones, and the savvy new Catwoman. However, Bruce finds himself distracted by the seemingly impossible return of another figure believed dead—his grandfather, Adrian Arkham. He must also comfort his longtime friend, Gotham City Mayor Jessica Dent, who is scarred both physically and mentally from her experience with the Riddler which resulted in the gruesome death of her brother.

But Harvey seems to be back, plotting revenge on a city he proclaims to be guilty. And when Batman discovers the truth to these many mysteries, his entire world starts to unravel…

Comics Deserve Better Episode 16: 4 Kids Walk Into A Bank by Matthew Rosenberg, Tyler Boss, and Thomas Mauer

On this episode of Comics Deserve Better, Brian and Logan geek out about the darkly comedic, crime comic 4 Kids Walk Into A Bank by Matthew Rosenberg, Tyler Boss, and Thomas Mauer.

They break down the cast of annoying, yet endearing middle-school-aged characters, their favorite sequences, and the connections that this Black Mask Studios masterpiece has to other works of pop culture. Brian and Logan also discuss the latest indie comics news, including Graham Coxon‘s comic Superstate from Z2, the announcement of Vault‘s queer monster love story Hollow Heart and Geoff Johns and Gary Frank‘s creator-owned series Geiger, and a new ordering format from Scout Comics. They also talk about the upcoming Black Hammer: Visions and their dream creators on the miniseries. Other comics mentioned on the show are We Only Find Them When They’re Dead, Getting It Together, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, and 12 Reasons to Die. (Episode art by Tyler Boss)

Black Hammer: Visions Opens Up a Playground for Creators

Experience Black Hammer like never before in this exciting reimagining of the Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston created, Eisner-award winning series! Black Hammer: Visions is a series of one-shots bringing some of comic’s most exciting talent into the Black Hammer Universe including Patton Oswalt, Geoff Johns, Scott Snyder, Dean Kotz, Scott Kolins, Chip Zdarsky, Johnnie Christmas, Cullen Bunn, Malachi Ward, Matt Sheean, Kelly Thompson, Leonardo Romero, Mariko Tamaki, Diego Olortegui, Cecil Castellucci, and Melissa Duffy, with colors by Jason Wordie, Bill Crabtree, Jordie Bellaire, and Dave Stewart and letters by Nate Piekos!

Kicking off Black Hammer: Visions, Patton Oswalt joins artists Dean Kotz and Jason Wordie to explore the life of youthful super heroine Golden Gail on the Black Hammer Farm before the beginning of Black Hammer#1, and her struggle to maintain sanity as a middle-aged woman trapped in the unchanging body of a superpowered grade-schooler. This 32-page issue also features variant covers by Evan Dorkin with Sarah Dyer, and Gilbert Hernandez with Dave Stewart!

Black Hammer: Visions #1 (of eight) will hit comic shops on February 10, 2021.

Geoff Johns and Gary Frank Reteam for Geiger, Coming from Image in April 2021

Geoff Johns and Gary Frank of DC’s Doomsday Clock reteam for a brand new series in 2021, Geiger. The new series will take local comic shops by storm in April from Image Comics.

Who are the scavengers of a dying earth? Geiger is set in the years since a nuclear war ravaged the planet, desperate outlaws battle for survival in a world of radioactive chaos. Out past the poisoned wasteland lives a man even the Nightcrawlers and Organ People fear. Some name him Joe Glow, others call him The Meltdown Man. But his name… is Geiger.

Geiger #1 will be available at comic book shops in April 2021.

Geiger #1
« Older Entries