Tag Archives: geoff johns

Preview: Shazam! #14

Shazam! #14

Written by: Geoff Johns
Art by: Scott Kolins, Dale Eaglesham

After a night battling robots across the globe, Billy Batson finds out not everyone loves superheroes when one of his teachers unleashes a lecture on the ethics of unchecked power and privilege. It’ll take more than just the wisdom of Solomon for the teen hero to figure this one out.

Shazam! #14

Get a First Look at Batman: Three Jokers #2

BATMAN: THREE JOKERS #2

Written by GEOFF JOHNS
Art and cover by JASON FABOK
Variant cover by JASON FABOK
PRESTIGE FORMAT | ON SALE 09/29/20
$6.99 US | 48 PAGES | 2 of 3 | FC
DC BLACK LABEL | AGES 17+

As Batman and Batgirl follow an unexpected thread linking the three Jokers with someone from the Dark Knight’s past, Red Hood dives headfirst into trouble and finds himself struggling to stay afloat without the aid of his allies.

Batman: Three Jokers continues its trajectory as the ultimate examination of The Joker and his never-ending conflict with Batman. Prepare yourselves for the second chapter of one of the most terrifying and personal mysteries Batman has ever faced!

BATMAN: THREE JOKERS #2

Review: Batman: Three Jokers #1

Batman: Three Jokers #1

Teased since the beginning of DC Rebirth, Batman: Three Jokers #1 begins to explore the Clown Prince of Crime and his various incarnations. The comic is an interesting one delivering a story that’s both expected and unexpected. The direction, so far, is a simple one giving us what is the simplest answer for the numerous variations on the same character. That simplicity also opens up a lot of questions distracting from the story.

Written by Geoff Johns, Batman: Three Jokers #1 reads similar to his take on Watchmen in Doomsday Clock. The writing at times feels stilted forgoing a natural flow. Jokes land with the seriousness of a doctor delivering grim news. The comic is generally joyless. But, it’s also interesting in that it attempts to answer a question no one was really asking and deliver an answer that’s not needed.

The Joker has been depicted as many things and often it’s just a force of nature. He’s chaos in human form and one that takes on whatever is needed at the time. In this concept, there are literally three Jokers. While some would consider that a spoiler, it’s something that’s been made clear for quite some time in the lead up to this debut. It takes what is a character that can morph into so many iterations and creates what is multiple and numerous distinct incarnations. While Batman can change over time, apparently his greatest rogue can not and in this being presented as is, it hurts the dynamic and connection between the two.

Where Johns makes things slightly interesting is the focus on the three Bat-family members most impacted by the Joker. Batman, Batgirl, and Jason Todd as Red Hood are the Bat-trio to take on the Joker-trio. Each of them face the Joker from their trauma. But, Johns falls into shock rather than exploration with the most surface level reading and reaction. Spoilers already abound as to what has happened but Johns takes us to the most base level of characters instead of delivering a more interesting and deeper exploration of the characters and their trauma. The answer to violence is apparently more violence.

The art by Jason Fabok with color by Brad Anderson and lettering by Rob Leigh is the most interesting thing about the comic. The design and look is solid. There’s a dark cloud that hangs over the comic giving us a proper “dark” in the Dark Night. The Jokers also differ enough from each other and update their classic designs into one style well. But, the issue’s art has similar issues the story and dialogue fall in to. There’s a stiffness to it all. Pages mostly are in nine page panels as if there’s an attempt to deliver a Watchmen visual experience. The comic could benefit from breaking the panels and delivering a more dynamic visual experience.

Batman: Three Jokers #1 isn’t bad in any way. It’s also not exciting. There’s a joyless stiffness to it. The comic takes itself a bit too seriously and comes off stilted and honestly boring. There are some interesting ideas that may flesh out as the story progresses. But, the first issue doesn’t excite me to move on. Like Doomsday Clock, it’s a story that has some interesting concepts but filters them through a filter that sucks out any of the fun and entertainment. It’s soulless. After so long of a wait, it’s hard to not get to the end and think “that’s it?”.

Story: Geoff Johns Art: Jason Fabok Color: Brad Anderson Letterer: Rob Leigh
Story: 6.5 Art: 7.75 Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Batman: Three Jokers #1

Batman: Three Jokers #1

Written by: Geoff Johns
Art by: Jason Fabok
Colorist Brad Anderson

Thirty years after Batman: The Killing Joke changed comics forever, Three Jokers reexamines the myth of who, or what, The Joker is and what is at the heart of his eternal battle with Batman. New York Times bestselling writer Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok, the writer/artist team that waged the “Darkseid War” in the pages of Justice League, reunite to tell the ultimate story of Batman and The Joker!

After years of anticipation starting in DC Universe: Rebirth #1, the epic miniseries you’ve been waiting for is here: find out why there are three Jokers, and what that means for the Dark Knight and the Clown Prince of Crime. It’s a mystery unlike any Batman has ever faced!

Batman: Three Jokers #1

TV Review: Stargirl E113 Stars & S.T.R.I.P.E. Part Two

Stargirl

The first season of Stargirl wraps up in “Stars & S.T.R.I.P.E.” part two that has the Justice Society taking on the Injustice Society in hopes of thwarting their plan. The opening of the episode is pretty solid with some nice sci-fi aspects as the plan is put into motion and we see its impact on the people around town. We also get some fun teasers for comic fans in the form of movie posters around the theater.

From there, the episode shifts into battle mode. It’s a knock out drag out fight that has the two teams battle. And it’s a hell of a battle with some solid action and the reveal of Solomon Grundy. There’s also some shocking twists that keeps viewers on their toes. There’s some truly unexpected moments which is impressive for a show like this.

And surprises, there’s a lot of them. There’s surprises including who lives and who dies and who does the killing. There’s some moral debate in the episode which makes certain moments quite shocking.

But the episode’s most interesting aspect is how it makes the villains somewhat sympathetic. Grundy is treated more like an animal unleashed. Icicle’s motives make sense and he there’s a case to be made about his actions and reasoning.

But what’s fascinating about the episode is… the body count of the series. Bad guys. Students. The series has quite a number of dead. But there’s always an explanation. And the finale kind of winks and nods at the silliness of such a major event just being explained away by the rest of the country.

It’s a cute finale with a final five minutes that’ll put a smile on your face in a Disney-ish sort of way. The finale also sets up a very intriguing second season.

And that kicker!

Stargirl’s first season finale is exactly what one would expect. It’s full of sacharine moments and a sweet innocence that has filled up and been a hallmark of the series. It’s one that, despite the body count, is full of positive energy and a demeanor that makes it a live action superhero series that can be enjoy by the whole family.

We’re already counting down for the second season of Stargirl and hopefully, it delivers the positive entertaining hour the first season pumped out with every episode. A fantastic finale for a hell of a debut season. A crown jewel in DC’s live-action offerings.

Overall Rating: 8.5

TV Review: Stargirl E112 Stars & S.T.R.I.P.E. Part One

Stargirl

Stargirl‘s first season begins to wrap up in the first of a two-part season finale. The Injustice Society is on the trail of Courtney, Pat and the team regroup to figure out their next steps. Meanwhile, Rick makes a breakthrough, and the team prepares for a showdown with the ISA.

The episode opens up with a bit more as to the plan of the ISA. It not only involves taking over the mind of a large chunk of the country but also build a country of their own. The picture is much clearer as the plan had been mentioned a lot but never what the real goal was. We knew the ISA wanted to make these folks see their views but for what purpose? It makes much more sense now until later in the episode.

The episode has the family scrambling as to what to do about the ISA hunting them and sort of addresses the fact that Pat’s son Mike doesn’t know what’s going on.

But, the action picks up quickly as Sportsmaster and Tigress are on the hunt to take out Pat, Courtney, and the family. It’s interesting and a bit mixed as far as a story goes. There’s some solid humor between Pat and Sportsmaster but why send only one villain to take them on? There’s a whole ISA to choose from and they don’t commit the resources they have. It’s a little frustrating but we get to see when the backup ISA is called in to help Tigress and Sportsmaster. Maybe that’s why they seem to go solo so often?

But, what the sequence really does is give a chance for Barbara to see Courtney in action and Mike to find out the truth about his father. It’s a nice natural way for both things to happen and gives that “wow” discovery aspect to both. It reminds us the viewer as to how special and awesome they are.

But all of that really is to get to that predictable moment of the story when both sides rally their sides and prepare for a final battle.

But, what’s really interesting is the last 5 or so minutes when exactly what the ISA wants to do with their nation is revealed. And… it might be good? Renewable energy. Universal healthcare. Eliminating racism and discrimination. But, there’s a catch, of course, there’s going to be a lot of dead bodies lying in the wake of the plan. It’s an interesting twist as to what the evil folks want and makes them not totally bad? The ISA wants to create paradise it sounds like but doing so in a beyond evil way.

Will they succeed? We’ll have to find out as Stargirl has just one more episode to go before the first season wraps up!

Overall Rating: 8.15

TV Review: Stargirl E111 Shining Knight

Stargirl

Who is Justin, the mysterious janitor? Stargirl dives into that with an opening dedicated to the character. For fans of the comic series, you know where things are going but the television show has done a solid job of keeping things up in the air.

That’s not the only mystery of the episode as Courtney’s real father arrives. It’s all a little dramatic and feels a little out of nowhere but it flows nicely and leads to some solid family dynamics.

The segment is good as it finally answers the question as to who Courtney’s real father is. It closes that plot point but it also puts the family back in the center of the episode. The moments involving Courtney, Pat, Barbara, and Mike are really important and is a reminder that at the center of the show is this family. It focuses on their relationships and ties nicely into recent issues with all of them. It also throws into question Courtney’s role as Stargirl, shifting from legacy to something better.

The episode really gets interesting when Brainwave and Icicle discuss what to do about Stargirl. Icicle actually shows some hesitation in just killing Courtney, and keep in mind this is a series that has been at ease killing kids. It adds a bit to Icicle beyond the cold killer and makes Brainwave a bit colder as well (though, he did kill his own kid).

There is a little silliness in the episode. How Henry’s death is handled by the school feels… off. Then again, this is the third kid who’s died in the school and no one seems to be questioning that at all.

As Stargirl heads to the end of the first season, the episode is solid as it refocuses the series a bit. Each episode up to this point has felt like it revolved around some action sequence or fight. This episode instead gets it back to basics of the family at the heart of the show. It also makes Courtney an even better character by making it really about her as Stargirl not her legacy as Starman’s daughter. Just like she realizes, she’s was chosen for more reasons than who she thought her father was. She has qualities to be a hero, more than her enthusiasm. This is the episode that puts that front and center.

Overall Rating: 8.15

Get a Look at New Artwork from Batman: Three Jokers #1

There’s been a lot of anticipation for Geoff Johns, Jason Fabok, and Brad Anderson to explain themselves when it was revealed that there wasn’t just one, but three versions of the Clown Prince of Crime that has bedeviled Batman and his crimefighting allies. The wait is not much longer as Batman: Three Jokers #1 comes to comic stores on Tuesday, August 25.

Thirty years after Batman: The Killing Joke changed comics forever, Batman: Three Jokers reexamines the myth of who, or what, The Joker is and what is at the heart of his eternal battle with Batman.

After years of anticipation starting in DC Universe: Rebirth #1, the epic miniseries you’ve been waiting for is here: find out why there are three Jokers, and what that means for the Dark Knight and the Clown Prince of Crime. It’s a mystery unlike any Batman has ever faced!

Batman: Three Jokers #1
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