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Geiger #1 Sells Out Again and Gets a Third Printing

The radioactive enthusiasm for the new series Geiger by Doomsday Clock creative team Geoff Johns and Gary Frank continues to burn through inventory of the debut issue at the distributor level. Image Comics has greenlit a third printing in order to keep up with mounting demand for the series.

Rapid paced pre-order activity from retailers on Geiger #1 triggered a rare pre-sell-out for the series with books shipping to stores already sold out at the distributor. A rush reprint was ordered ahead of the release date to accommodate the spike in demand, but the reorder activity has overtaken the inventory once again as buzz for the new series grows.

Geiger is set in the years after a nuclear war ravaged the planet where desperate outlaws battle for survival in a world of radioactive chaos. Out past the poisoned wasteland lives a man even the Nightcrawlers and Organ People fear. Some name him Joe Glow, others call him the Meltdown Man. But his name… is Geiger.

Geiger #1, third printing (Diamond Code FEB219020) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, May 19.

Geiger #1 third printing

Review: Geiger #1

Geiger #1

Geiger #1 kicks off the high-profile indie series from Geoff Johns and Gary Frank. The duo previously worked on DC’s Doomsday Clock, a series that overall fell short of expectations. Geiger #1 does the same.

Geiger #1 really should be called “Old Man knock-off”. The series focuses on the myth of a glowing individual out in the desert who survives the irradiated wastes without a radiation suit. We’re taken through the tragedy of a man who lost his family and was caught in a nuclear explosion leading to today.

The problem is, the setup doesn’t really help the story at all. Johns and Frank leave far too many questions that distract from the main story. It also feels like a retread of so many stories before. There just isn’t that originality or spark to make the debut stand out. It’s not bad, it just doesn’t deliver an interesting enough debut.

In Tariq, aka The Meltdown Man, we get an origin that’s been done to death, an individual caught in a nuclear explosion. With his family safely in a shelter, he’s caught outside to experience things along with attackers attempting to take over the shelter from his family. It’s a fine enough start but there’s no attachment at all. These aren’t characters we get to know. There’s little to feel sympathy for what they go through. Some racism is thrown in by the attackers in what I think is an attempt to do that but it falls flat overall. The attack too comes out of nowhere. There’s not a lot of setup, it just happens which causes a distraction. There’s a detachment with the story due to those two things.

Frank’s art is good. Along with Brad Anderson‘s color, the story is nice to look at. But, as presented we get a world that also doesn’t feel one and the same. There’s scavengers in irradiation suits, the Meltdown Man in his superhero gear, and then a kingdom… where they don’t wear suits? It’s all a little odd and doesn’t make a whole lot of sense visually. But, it looks nice. Rob Leigh‘s lettering packs in a lot as Johns scripts tend go dialogue heavy. It’s impressive how much makes it on to some pages and panels without issue. The only thing is one bit of dialogue at the bottom of a panel that feels like it’s cut off by the imaginary border.

Geiger #1 has a lot of good ideas. It just doesn’t present them well. There’s a choppiness to the story and a disconnect that has me not caring about the characters or what happens. It’s concepts without logic or heart. Maybe it comes together a bit more down the line but as is, this is a debut that doesn’t live up to the excitement and hype.

Story: Geoff Johns Art: Gary Frank
Color: Brad Anderson Letterer: Rob Leigh
Story: 5.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 5.5 Recommendation: Pass

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Geiger #1 Sells Out Ahead of Release and Gets a Second Printing

The highly anticipated new series Geiger—by Doomsday Clock creative team Geoff Johns and Gary Frank—will ship to comic book stores sold out. Early demand for the series has depleted the entirety of the debut issue’s print run, tripping the alarm for preemptive second printings of Geiger #1 ahead of its April 7 on sale date.

Reorder activity from retailers on Geiger #1 is multiplying at a breakneck pace. Image has greenlit two variations of the Gieger #1, second printing cover in response. Both will feature art by Frank, but one will feature Geiger’s chartreuse skull, while the Cover B will reveal his cowled face.

Geiger is set in the years after a nuclear war ravaged the planet where desperate outlaws battle for survival in a world of radioactive chaos. Out past the poisoned wasteland lives a man even the Nightcrawlers and Organ People fear. Some name him Joe Glow, others call him the Meltdown Man. But his name… is Geiger.

Geiger #1, first printing will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 7—grab it from your local comic shop while supplies last.

Geiger #1, second printing Cover A (Diamond Code FEB219018) and Geiger #1, second printing Cover B 1:25 incentive (Diamond Code FEB219019) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 28.

A Glow in the Dark variant of Geiger #1 (FEB210013) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 21.

Geiger #1 Gets a Raw Variant

Image Comics has unveiled a highly collectible raw variant cover for the forthcoming Geiger #1 by Doomsday Clock’s creative team Geoff Johns and Gary Frank. This variant will be shipped exclusively to Diamond UK direct market accounts and is designed to benefit our international partners during what has been an especially difficult time for small, independently owned businesses.

The raw variant will feature an unpolished version of the Geiger #1 cover art that displays the intricacies of the creative process—pencils, guides, and other imperfections seen on the original artwork drawn by Frank.

It will be available in limited quantities upon release Wednesday, April 7.

This version of the Geiger #1 cover celebrates the art and creative process that went into developing the stunning final cover. 

Geiger #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 7:

  • Cover A Frank – FEB210009      
  • Cover B Larsen – FEB210010      
  • Cover C Fabok – FEB210011      
  • Cover D Blank Sketch Var – FEB210012      

A Glow in the Dark variant of Geiger #1 (FEB210013) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 21.

Geiger #1 Diamond UK Variant

Geiger #1 Gets a Black & White Thank You Variant

Image Comics is pleased to unveil a black and white variant cover of the forthcoming Geiger #1 by Doomsday Clock’s creative team Geoff Johns and Gary Frank as a Thank You to support the Direct Market US retailers.

This black and white version will ship with no financial burden to retailers and feature a highly collectible uncolored version of the Geiger #1 cover art. It will showcase the detailed inks by Frank.

The black and white Geiger #1 variant will be available in limited quantities—exclusively at local comic shops—upon release Wednesday, April 7. Interested fans should inquire with their local comic shop for availability. 

Geiger #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 7:

  • Cover A Frank – FEB210009      
  • Cover B Larsen – FEB210010      
  • Cover C Fabok – FEB210011      
  • Cover D Blank Sketch Var – FEB210012      

A Glow in the Dark variant of Geiger #1 (FEB210013) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 21.

Geiger #1 US Variant

Review: Infinite Frontier #0

Infinite Frontier #0

Dark Knights: Death Metal is over and we’ve seen a possible future timeline in “Future State”. Now, DC begins to chart its path with the first crumbs teased in Infinite Frontier #0. The issue serves as a guide as to the various series and status-quo that awaits them. With a new omniverse to explore, anything is possible and the comic does its job to remind us of that.

The comic’s story is delivered in a narrative driven by two characters as our guide. It’s a spin on the classic Christmas Carol and It’s a Wonderful Life. Wonder Woman believes a threat is looming and wants to witness the state of things before making a major decision about her role in the DC Universe.

With Wonder Woman and Spectre as our guide, we’re taken on a tour of the characters highlighting the comics to come. The Justice League, Batman, Wonder Girl, Alan Scott, Teen Titans Academy, Superman, Green Arrow and Black Canary, Star Girl, Green Lanterns, and the Flash all get a moment to show off where things stand. All of it is good and interesting though few of what’s presented really excites. It feels like an extended teaser and preview. It takes its concept as a guidebook almost too seriously. The comic feels a bit more like the extension of the ending of Dark Knights: Death Metal where we saw many of these ideas initially teased.

Infinite Frontier #0 credits

But, what’s intriguing is what’s presented and doesn’t have a comic attached to them. Infinite Frontier #0 teases more than what’s already announced giving hope as to what we’ll see in July and beyond. There’s also teases through artwork of the various series DC teased at the recent ComicsPro. It’s interesting in that way that the stories feel less like the exciting first 15 minutes before the credits to get you pumped. Instead, the stories are a bit dry and more to lay out where things stand with the concepts thrown out being the hooks. The action isn’t the hook, the ideas are.

The art of the comic is solid. Each segment flows into the next and with a few exceptions, the styles work well together. There are some fantastic spreads with Wonder Woman as she talks to Spectre about what she’s witnessing. There’s a few panels and pages that’ll leave you lingering to stare at. The colors really pop on pages delivering a sense of energy that really fits the new status of the DC Universe.

Infinite Frontier #0 isn’t bad but it doesn’t quite excite. By the end of the issue I found myself more excited about concepts than the comics themselves. Very few of the segments left me wanting to immediately find out what happens next. Instead, it the comic feels like a short ashcan, teasing what’s to come with a few pages and back material to fill things out. It shows what’s to come but it never quite puts things over. Instead, it nails its role as a guide, a way to browse what DC has to offer.

Story: Brian Michael Bendis, James Tynion IV, Becky Cloonan, Michael W. Conrad, Joëlle Jones, Tim Sheridan, Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Joshua Williamson, Geoff Johns, Geoffrey Thorne
Art: David Marquez, Jorge Jimeez, Alitha Martinez, Mark Morales, Joëlle Jones, Stephen Byrne, Rafa Sandoval, Jordi Tarragona, Jamal Igle, Alex Maleev, Todd Nauck, Dexter Soy, Howard Porter, John Romita, Jr., Klaus Janson
Color: Tamra Bonvillain, Tomeu Morey, Emilio Lopez, Jordie Bellaire, Stephen Byrne, Alejandro Sanchez, Hi-Fi, Alex Sinclair, Brad Anderson
Letterer: Troy Peteri
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Stargirl Heads on Spring Break in May with Geoff Johns and Todd Nauck and the Seven Soldiers of Victory

After months and months of fighting crime and handling universe-threatening enemies, even superheroes need a springtime vacation. But thanks to award-winning writer Geoff Johns and artist Todd Nauck, there’s no Cancun, Miami, or South Padre Island on Stargirl’s itinerary in this 48-page one-shot, on sale May 4!

Courtney Whitmore’s spring break plans aren’t like your average high schooler’s. Instead of hanging out with friends, she’s heading out on an adventure with her stepfather, Pat Dugan, a.k.a. S.T.R.I.P.E., and teaming up with his former team, the Seven Soldiers of Victory! The soldiers are forced to reunite again to unearth the secret eighth soldier of victory, but what other secrets lay buried, and what does it all mean for Courtney’s future as Stargirl?

Anybody can hang out at the beach and party, but for fans of Stargirl, Golden Age superheroes, and fast-paced fun and adventure, the Stargirl Spring Break Special is a must-read! The book arrives at comic book stores and participating digital retailers on May 4 for $5.99. The physical version also features a card stock variant cover by Mike McKone for $6.99.

Stargirl Spring Break Special

DC Celebrates John Stewart’s Legacy with a Commemorative Hardcover Collection

As DC’s first Black Super Hero, and since his first appearance on the cover and in the pages of Green Lantern #87 on October 28, 1971, John Stewart has worn the ring of the Green Lantern Corps with honor, dignity, and unparalleled courage. On June 22, 2021, DC recognizes this trailblazer with a hardcover collection of his greatest adventures!

Green Lantern: John Stewart – A Celebration of 50 Years is a 368-page collection of the ring-bearer’s most memorable adventures, both earthbound and spacefaring. From his first appearance in the legendary Denny O’Neil/Neal Adams Green Lantern run, to taking over from Hal Jordan as Earth’s Green Lantern, to calling the shots in the latest incarnation of the Justice League, some of the greatest John Stewart stories in DC history are in this collection. Storytellers include Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams, Len Wein, Geoff Johns, Judd Winick, Dale Eaglesham, Ed Benes, and many others.

Featuring a stunning cover by Jim Lee and Scott Williams, this $39.99 hardcover collects Green Lantern Vol. 2 #87, #182, and #185, Green Lantern Vol. 3 #74 and #156, Green Lantern Vol. 4 #49, Justice League Vol. 4 #40, and Justice League of America #110. This collection also contains brand-new essays from John Stewart co-creator Neal Adams, acclaimed screenwriters John Ridley and Geoff Johns, and the voice of John Stewart from the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated TV shows, actor Phil LaMarr! The book arrives in comic book stores and on participating digital platforms on Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Green Lantern: John Stewart – A Celebration of 50 Years

Around the Tubes

All About Me

It was a relatively quiet day yesterday as far as comic news but we’ve still got some for you to start your day!

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: Grab a slice of ALL ABOUT ME – Free comics!

The Beat – The Beat’s 2021 Creator Survey Part 4: the year we really missed conventions – More thoughts from the industry.

Variety – Geoff Johns Still Working With WarnerMedia, Despite Ray Fisher’s Claim Writer Is Leaving Studio – ….

Movie Review: Wonder Woman 1984 Delivers Throwback Fun

Wonder Woman 1984

The much delayed and anticipated Wonder Woman 1984 has finally been released in an unprecedented roll of the dice and experiment by Warner Bros. and its parent company AT&T. Released on HBO Max and in theaters, the film has pivoted a few times due to the current pandemic and shifting needs of consumers. Taking advantage of my big-screen television and surround sound, and not wanting to risk COVID, I took advantage of my HBO Max subscription to watch the film and in doing so, I felt transported back decades to the early years of comic film adaptations. That’s both a good and bad thing in the end. But, the end result is a film that’ll be polarizing and over years most likely dissected, analyzed, and opinion will shift for the positive.

Shifting the setting decades from the original, Wonder Woman is now in 1984 living her dual life. Longing for the return of her Steve Trevor, she’s been lonely and somewhat isolated. Enter the dreamstone, a MacGuffin that can make wishes come true. A failed businessman, Maxwell Lord, also wants the statue in hopes that he’ll be able to turn around his ventures and become a worldwide business dynamo. What results is a film that examines the 80s while also upending superhero movies in many ways.

Directed by the returning Patty Jenkins, Wonder Woman 1984 features a story by Jenkins and Geoff Johns with a screenplay by Jenkins, Johns, and Dave Callaham. The story and direction have their bumps but overall the film feels like a throwback to earlier years of superhero films both in tone and look. This isn’t a film filled with cynicism and negativity. Instead, it’s a story about hope, love, and a positive future. It’s bright at times and wears its pacifist leanings on its armored sleeve.

The biggest break from other superhero films is the lack of a villain with a motivation to cause harm. Played by Pedro Pascal, Maxwell Lord is Donald Trump mixed with 1980s television hucksters. It’s established early Lord is a fraud attempting to make money through a pyramid scheme. He wants a successful business not to rule anything and we see that through his actions.

In the end, the issue presented is desires uncontrolled. Lord’s plan spirals out of control putting the world on the brink of nuclear war. In that way, we get a very different story from DC and Marvel films of the past. This isn’t a nefarious plan so much as a mistake. It’s a scam that gets out of control and results in unintended consequences.

Jenkins attempts to have fun with that spiraling out of control world as things amp up slowly and then the avalanche. Lord wants more and uses his newfound powers in an attempt to enrich himself and at the same time also create some stability… which only creates more instability. We’ve seen a similar plot in Bruce Almighty. While that film stayed isolated to Buffalo, this takes it to a global scale.

The team slowly builds Lords out of control failure from his empty office, to the Middle East, to the White House, and then beyond. It’s a ramping up of an out of control power and a man desperate to figure out what to do next. He easily could have just made himself the ruler of the world but he doesn’t. He wants to be “the” businessman.

Jenkins attempts to bring an 80s vision to the film’s 1980s setting. That results in a mixed result. The tone of the film has much more in common with Richard Donner‘s Superman than it does with anything post-2000, the “modern superhero film era”. Its colors, lighting, and overall attitude are one of positivity. It has a light tone never taking itself too seriously and playing loose with the logic of the story. We’re treated to a finale that breaks from the traditional punching that crescendoes most comic films. It puts an exclamation point that the film attempts to do something different.

But what the film really does is remove itself from the meta-cinematic universe we come to expect. Yes, the film has the return of Steve Trevor from the first story but it has little direct impact on other DC films nor does it set up or continue a meta story that involves 20 other films. It’s a two-issue story arc giving us breaks between drawn-out “events”. It’s supposed to be a breezy popcorn film focused on fun and it generally succeeds.

The film absolutely has issues with its story. Trevor’s return has a lingering of rape due to how it’s done. Kristen Wiig‘s Barbara Minerva/Cheetah is underused. Some of the film could have been tightened up in the details. The film is loose with some fat to it. Minor changes would have made a leaner and tighter film. Special effects at times are rough and some fight sequences feel a bit uninspired. But, every comic film released has had problems none are perfect and there are modern releases that are in a far rougher shape than this.

The actors all bring some interesting aspects to the film. Gal Gadot is supposed to be front and center and while she plays alone very well, she doesn’t quite have the draw power she had in the first film. That’s partially because everyone else is so over the top in their performances that her Diana/Wonder Woman comes off as too serious and dour at times.

Returning is Chris Pine as Steve Trevor. Pine has the most fun of the actors continually being excited about the world he’s returned to. The joke happens over and over but Pine’s delivery never gets old and through him, the film gets to poke a lot of fun at the time period. Pine is our time capsule reminding us of the fashion, dances, and innovations of the decade.

Joining Gadot and Pine are Kristen Wiig as Barbara Minerva and Pedro Pascal as Maxwell Lord, the two “villains” of the film. I put that word in quotations because neither is truly evil.

Wiig plays the bookwormish Minerva who also works in the museum with Gadot’s Diana. In Diana she sees someone she inspires to be and her wish to do so brings unintended consequences. Wiig does a fantastic job of evolving from one thing to the other playing a convincing flower blooming. She does the stumbling nerd well and then the confident woman everyone wants to be around. There’s a lot of 80s John Hughes in the performance and it captures the decade well.

Pedro Pascal puts in an over the top performance tapping so much of what was wrong the decade. His scheming Lord is the insecure loser and con-artist we knew so many of the titans of the time were. Donald Trump, televangelists, late-night infomercials, Lord is all of these things in a bad wig. He’s the embodiment of everything wrong during that time period and does it with a delivery that emphasizes the slime. But, he also gives us a villain who isn’t so much one and as we learn someone the audience can relate to more than they want to admit.

Wonder Woman 1984 feels like the enjoyment will be directly inversed to how cynical one is. The more you are, the less you’ll like it. It’s a film that doesn’t take itself seriously and just roles with its ideas. The action sequences are enjoyable, performances a bit over the top, and a story that you just roll with. This is a popcorn film that wants you to not think and just go for the ride. It’s comic book escapism that takes its tone and look from comics delivering popcorn digital enjoyment.

Overall Rating: 8.0

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