Tag Archives: exit generation

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

JR2_CoverB_VariantWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: Howard the Duck #1 (Marvel) – Chip Zdarsky is putting out one of the most entertaining Marvel comics around with Howard the Duck. My top pick was a tough decision between this and Johnny Red #2, and that’s honestly a good problem to have.

Bigfoot: Sword Of The Earthman #1 (Action Lab Entertainment) – This looks like a mix of John Carter, Gladiator and Bigfoot. Which sounds amazing.

Extraordinary X-Men #3 (Marvel) – I actually never read issue #2 due a slight snafu with Diamond not delivering it to my LCS, so I’ll be getting two issues to read on Wednesday, and based on the buzz I’ve heard about #2, I’m excited for #3 as well.

Johnny Red #2 (Titan Comics) – This Garth Ennis penned series came out of nowhere last month to be one of the best comics I ended up reading with it’s tale of a Second World War British fighter pilot facing off against the Nazi’s in Russia. I can’t wait to get my hands on this issue.

Seduction Of The Innocent #1 (Dynamite Entertainment) – looks like an old school crime comic with some modern flair. My fancy is tickled.

 

Ash

Top Pick: Spidey #1 (Marvel) – As a huge Spider-Man fan I am always excited and interested in new titles, and this is no different. A fresh take on a young web-head…well it has been done before (Ultimate Spider-Man anyone?) but you know I am really excited by this new take. It promises to be fun, action packed and completely modern (#Spidey?). The artwork is bold, bright and as fresh as the plotline promises to be. For any true-believers out there, this is an issue not to be missed!

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Private Eye Deluxe Edition (Image Comics) – It’s actually a tough week for choices and I could easily do a top twenty myself, but I have to go with the Private Eye as my top pick. First, there’s a good chance you missed this when it was first released as a digital comic. Second, it’s by Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin. Third, it’s fantastic. Fourth, this series was launched as a pay what you want directly from Vaughan, and is a solid example of disrupting the system successfully, so much so it’s in print. So, pick this up in print, or go and grab it digitally. Just make sure to read it.

Carver: A Paris Story #1 (Z2 Comics) – Z2 has been putting out solid books regularly and this new series has a nice throwback to 70s European action films. There’s lots of cliches, but that’s partially what makes it all really fun. This should be creator Chris Hunt’s break out series. Do yourself a favor and give it a look.

Johnny Red #2 (Titan Comics) – Did you read the first issue? If so, that should be reason enough as to why this is on the list. Writer Garth Ennis is taking on the classic character and doing so in a brilliant way. Just completely caught me off guard int he quality, because holy crap it’s good.

Sheriff of Babylon #1 (Vertigo) – I did an early review of the issue and it’s not what I thought it’d be. At its heart, Sheriff of Babylon is a crime comic set in a warzone. What’s really impressive and fascinating is writer Tom King’s use of his real life experiences.

X’Ed #1 (Black Mask Studios) – It’d be easy to just call this Inception the comic, but there’s much more going on here than a trippy dive in to someone’s mind. The comic has some really interesting twists and turns in the first issue that kept me on my toes, and that ending is rather intriguing. Black Mask Studios has had a string of hits and I expect this to be their next.

 

Elana

Cyborg #5 (DC Comics) – Writer David F Walker is doing something significant in sci-fi with this comic. It’s a superhero series about race. I’m a huge supporter of where he’s going with this. Listen to our interview with him a few weeks back.

Gotham Academy #12 (DC Comics) – This is one of my favorite comics and I feel like its been going under the radar. Amazingly written, a diverse group of kids, art that can be both adorable and haunting as needed. I don’t even catch all of the easter eggs and references to Batman lore from ages past but that doesn’t matter.  The school is haunted both literally and metaphorically and it’s impossible to not be invested in these stories. This is the last issue of a wonderful arc.

The Humans #10 / Image Firsts The Humans #1 (Image Comics) – If you’ve been reading this kickass 1970-biker-apesploitation series then you need issue 10, the culmination of the first miniseries. This month Image Comics is also reissuing number 1 so tell the fresh meat there’s something they need to buy for good times and cheap thrills. This comic feels like an ultra-violent 1970s underground comic, it comes with it’s own online soundtrack and the art is freaking flawless. Still not convinced? Here’s my review of the first part of the series.

Papergirls #3 (Image Comics) –  This is the new Saga: very friendly to non-comics readers, totally enchanting, breathlessly exciting and full of amazing female characters. Read J9s review of issue 2. Boy, that was a “heart in your throat” cliff hanger at the end of the last issue!

Space Riders TP Vol. 1 (Black Mask Studios) – It feels like 70’s Jack Kirby filtered through many levels of Heavy Metal Magazine (think Moebius, Druillet). Only more underground and loose. A bit of a space western with a Jodorowsky-ish flying skull ship! A more Red Sonja-ish Gamora. Christy Karacas (creator of the cartoon Super Jail) levels of choas and scribble. If my description makes sense to you then you’ll probably like this. If my description doesn’t make sense to you, and you are ok with that, you may like it too. “I like my coffee like I like my space: black and infinite”- Capitan Peligro.

 

Thomas

Top Pick: Robin War #1 (DC Comics) – Perfectly timed for the winter season, DC Comics is running a small event that crosses over the various Robin titles, bookended by these one-shots. Previews and solicits make this event look like it could be a lot of fun, so it’s a definite must-read!

All-New X-Men #1 (Marvel) – Continuing Marvel’s All-New All-Different launches, this gives Dennis Hopeless the chance to write young superheroes once again. The All-New X-Men – minus Jean Grey, but with Kid Apocalypse and Idie added to their ranks – are headed for a road-trip to decide their role in the future of the Marvel Universe. All-New X-Men may not be set to headline the X-Men range as it did under Brian Bendis, but it still looks set to be one of the most fun comics out there.

Exit Generation #3 (ComixTribe) – Sam Read and Caio Oliveira have been producing an unusual but fantastic series, steeped in sci-fi and with an admirable sense of style. Independent comics don’t often get the attention they deserve, and this series is one that deserves a lot of attention!

Invincible Iron Man #4 (Marvel) – One of the strangest shifts in All-New All-Different Marvel is a change in Mary-Jane Watson’s status quo. She’s going from a member of Spider-Man’s supporting cast to a member of Iron Man’s supporting cast, and this is the issue that kicks that off. It’s going to be fascinating to see how (not to mention why) Brian Bendis pulls this off…

Spider-Gwen: Most Wanted Trade Paperback (Marvel) – The first Spider-Gwen series (shorted to a miniseries due to Secret Wars) was tremendously popular, and this is the chance to collect it as a trade paperback! Jason Latour and Robbi Rodriguez pull off a tremendously fun story with energy and verve, and this book is sure to impress anyone who didn’t pick up the original issues.

Mini Reviews

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Alex

Hercules_1_CoverDead Vengeance #2, is set during the 1940’s and reads, in the very best of ways, as if it was a Golden Age comic that has been produced today. The concept of a reanimated corpse who may have been murdered solving their own murder is strangely compelling, and is presented here with a fresh take and enough humour to make it worth adding to your pull list. Overall Rating: 8 Recommendation: Buy

We Stand On Guard #5. The lines continue to blur in the thought provoking miniseries that asks some tough questions about the nature of war. Overall Rating: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Hercules #1* – There’s something really fun about this comic, with Hercules trying to move past his drunken reputation and revive the heroic reputation he used to have, by using less conventional mythological means. The comic is fun, and I’m a fan of the direction ol’ Herc is headed in. Overall Rating: 8 Recommendation Buy

Extraordinary X-Men #1* was …okay. The entire issue felt like a giant prologue for the rest of the trade, so based on this comic I’d probably wait for that. Or pick it up next month depending on how the second issue rates. Art is great, though. Overall Rating: 6.75 Recommendation: Wait To Read

Brett

Atomic Robo and the Ring of Fire #3 – It feels a bit like Pacific Rim for kids, but that’s not a bad thing as I’m still having fun reading the series. Giant robots and giant monsters + Atomic Robo! What’s not to love. Overall Rating: 8 Recommendation: Read

Axcend #2 – On the surface the comic might seem like a goofy video games and comic mashup, but it’s JohnnyRed1really an examination of gamer stereotypes and personalities. It’s getting interesting. Overall Rating: 7.25 Recommendation: Read

Black Science #17 – I just love this series and it’s many realities and complete crazy ideas. This issue kicks off a newish arc and could be a good starting point and it’s ideas somehow get even more out there. And that ending! Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Deadpool # 1 – I didn’t enjoy last volume, and I didn’t enjoy this first issue of this volume either. The story doesn’t interest me. The humor doesn’t get me to laugh. And the character feels like he’s beyond over saturated. No thanks! Overall Rating: 5 Recommendation: Pass

Exit Generation #2 – The series is shaping up to be a fun read. Just one of those comics you can pick up and have fun. I’m liking how the characters are shaping out, including a female Han Solo-ish character this issue. Fun is the key word. Overall Rating: 7 Recommendation: Read

Johnny Red #1 – I went in not expecting a whole lot, but writer Garth Ennis does do some solid war comics. I was blown away by this first issue which not only has a great story (and way to tell it), but also solid art too. A fantastic surprise. Overall Rating: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Klaus #1 – I’m not the biggest Morrison fan, but this series’ first issue surprised me. It’s a combination of Conan with a bit of holiday magic. But the art by Dan Mora really stands out, outshining the story. Overall Rating: 8 Recommendation: Read

Lazarus #20 – The comic continues the political and military maneuvering as it’s all out war. The series is never disappointing. Overall Rating: 8 Recommendation: Read

Nailbiter #17 – I seriously love this serious about serial killers all from a small town. This issue kicks off a new story arc which isn’t quite new reader friendly, but a good starting point. One of the first comics I read each time I get ahold of it. Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Read

Rasputin #10 – We’re given lots of insight in how Rasputin is still alive and working as an American political adviser. While I wish the mystery was played out a bit more, it’s all very interesting and somewhat what I expected. A series that’s such a great idea, and really entertaining. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye #46 – What always surprises me about IDW’s Transformers is how it gives so much depth to the characters that’s lacked at times elsewhere. This issue is all about confronting stereotypes post war and if a Decepticon can change his stripe. Overall Rating: 8.40 Recommendation: Read

Velvet #12 – Fuck Bond, give me Velvet. Overall Rating: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Elana

PaperGirls02_CoverPaper Girls #2 – Top notch creative team has a huge hit on their hands. Issue 1 was super accessible but issue 2 is super emotionally charged. I love the realistic female characters and dialogue . The strong sense of time and place as a Cleveland suburb in 1988 is outstanding. It’s one of the most solidly rooted pieces of fiction around. This cliff hanger though has got me on edge and I genuinely don’t know what’s next. Overall Rating: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Monstress #1: It’s beautiful & terrifying & a necessary fantasy book. In terms of unique world building and feminist sensibility plus accessibility to non comics readers I think Image has a new Saga sized hit on their hands. Overall Rating: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Humans #9 – The series has been getting more nihilist as things go downhill for our protagonist biker-chimp-Vietnam-vet. He cannot leave his ghosts behind and immersing himself in a world of greater violence sure ain’t helping. It gets hard to read at times but it’s true to the character and the world he inhabits. The art is tight as ever. A few particularly haunting panels this issue.

I did enjoy getting to watch Queenie , Cha Cha, Snacks and the other biker chicks (but really mostly Queenie) throw down and fight and beat up the fuzz. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fight Club 2 # 6 – This is a great comic that lives up to its premise: an examination of the modern construct of masculinity. Smart, twisty with extremely brutal humor. It’s utterly fearless and a lot of fun. If you liked the book or the movie you need to drop everything and pick this up. Overall Rating: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Mr. H

Amazing Spider-Man #3* – This run just keeps getting more fun and we are treated to the best issue yet. Anytime you get Spidey and Johnny Storm under the same roof it’s high tide hijinx. Slott really nails the dynamic between these two. He understands their brotherly bond quite well. It was cool to see the new home of Parker Industries is the former Baxter Building. Watching Spidey and Torch argue and fight throughout the issue was very entertaining and the art by Giuseppe Camuncoli was stellar. Really liked the touching scene at the end as well as a great cliffhanger. Another W for this title. Overall Rating: 9 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write.

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Preview: Exit Generation #2

Exit Generation #2

(W) Sam Read (A) Caio Oliveira (CA) Ramon Villalobos, Joe Mulvey

To rescue their loved ones from the insatiable Ruleians, Jack and Mo seek the aid of a pair of antisocial outcasts, and get way more than they bargained for.  Meanwhile, the humans trapped in orbit by their hungry extraterrestrial kidnappers find an unlikely ally! The sci-fi, punk rock adventure from writer Sam Read (Find) and artist Caio Oliveira (Super Ego) continues; make sure you jump aboard!

EG_02_CT

Review: Exit Generation #1

Exit GenerationIt’s 2055. Ninety percent of the world’s population have abandoned a resource-depleted Earth in search of a better home in the cosmos. Those left behind find themselves in an unexpected paradise… and Jack is bored out of his mind. He dreams of action inspired by 80’s movies and punk rock. But when a legion of carnivorous aliens arrive, Jack learns you should be careful what you wish for…

Exit Generation #1 is an interesting comic, in that it’s not what I expected at all. I had previously read writer Sam Read‘s work with his ComixTribe comic Find, which I thought was an amazing release. Find, and Exit Generation, share some similar themes, but beyond that the two works are very far apart tonally.

Exit Generation really revolves around Jack in this new world. Unless we really come to like or enjoy Jack as a character, the comic might not win us over. And I think that’s where my issue with the comic is. Jack isn’t like-able in the first issue, though I have no doubt that he’ll grow and become a hero over time. And because Jack didn’t win me over, I found the comic just ok.

What I did find enjoyable and interesting is the world Read has set up. With most of the human population gone, there’s an excess of goods and materials, which creates an interesting world I wish we could explore more before the twist towards the end. It’s a fascinating concept that could turn into a hell of an exploration and idea.

Cao Oliveira‘s art is very solid with each character having a distinct look and feel about them. The world looks and feels familiar with something just slightly off in the presentation, which makes it futuristic and alien in a weird way. Almost like a junk planet.

Exit Generation is an interesting debut overall. I like the concepts, I’m just not completely sold on the end result. It might have been due to high expectations set by Read’s Find, but I found the first issue of Exit Generation to be good, just not great.

Story: Sam Read Art: Caio Oliveira
Story: 7 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

ComixTribe provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Exit Generation #1 (of 4)

Exit Generation #1 (of 4)

Story: Sam Read
Art: Caio Oliveira
Colors: Ruth Redmond
Cover A: Ramon Villalobos
Cover B: Joe Mulvey
August / 32 Pages / FC / MR / $3.99
DIAMOND ID: JUL151204

It’s 2055. Ninety percent of the world’s population have abandoned a resource-depleted Earth in search of a better home in the cosmos. Those left behind find themselves in an unexpected paradise… and Jack is bored out of his mind. He dreams of action inspired by 80’s movies and punk rock. But when a legion of carnivorous aliens arrive, Jack learns you should be careful what you wish for…

Featuring covers by Ramon Villalobos (E is for Extinction) and connecting variants by Joe Mulvey (SCAM), EXIT GENERATION is a breakneck sci-fi adventure, full of DIY spirit.

EXIT GENERATION #1 Cover

ComixTribe in September 2015

Exit Generation #1 (of 4)

Story: Sam Read
Art: Caio Oliveira
Colors: Ruth Redmond
Cover A: Ramon Villalobos
Cover B: Joe Mulvey
August / 32 Pages / FC / MR / $3.99
DIAMOND ID: JUL151204

It’s 2055. Ninety percent of the world’s population have abandoned a resource-depleted Earth in search of a better home in the cosmos.  Those left behind find themselves in an unexpected paradise… and Jack is bored out of his mind. He dreams of action inspired by 80’s movies and punk rock. But when a legion of carnivorous aliens arrive, Jack learns you should be careful what you wish for…

Featuring covers by Ramon Villalobos (E is for Extinction) and connecting variants by Joe Mulvey (SCAM), EXIT GENERATION is a breakneck sci-fi adventure, full of DIY spirit.

Exit Generation #1 (of 4)

 

OXYMORON: The Loveliest Nightmare #2 (of 4)

Story: John Lees & Tyler James
Art: Alex Cormack
Colors: Jules Rivera
Cover A: Alex Cormack
Cover B: Joe Mulvey
August / 32 Pages / FC / MR / $3.99
DIAMOND ID:
JUL151205

Question: What do a gun-loving Senator, a gang-banger on the rise, and Swanstown’s top cop have in common?  Answer: All three men are about to be engulfed in the OXYMORON’s loveliest nightmare. Just as Detective Mary Clark puts her life back together, the contradiction obsessed killer’s plan makes it all come crashing down.

Written by John Lees (And Then Emily Was Gone) and Tyler James (The Red Ten), with art by Alex Cormack (Find), the visceral thriller in the vein of Se7en and Hannibal that answers the question “What if The Joker came to a Gotham WITHOUT Batman?” continues!

Features a variant cover by “the most dangerous man in comics” Joe Mulvey (SCAM).

OXYMORON The Loveliest Nightmare #2 (of 4)

ComixTribe Brings Underground UK Hit Exit Generation to the Direct Market

Today, ComixTribe announced it will bring the four-part science fiction adventure series Exit Generation by Sam Read and Caio Oliveira, with covers by artist Ramon Villalobos to the direct market.

Set in a near future, where a sudden depopulation of Earth has resulted in a comfortable but dull utopia, Exit Generation follows a bored punk named Jack, who is thrust suddenly into the unlikely role of savior when hungry aliens snatch his nearest and dearest.  The first issue of this monthly series lands in comic shops and on Comixology in September.

In addition to four brilliant covers by Ramon Villalobos, EXIT GENERATION’s direct market release will feature a special variant, ComixTribe’s first ever set of four connecting covers by the most dangerous man in comics, Joe Mulvey.

Exit Generation