Tag Archives: erick arciniega

Review: The Amazing Spider-Man: Red Goblin

The Amazing Spider-Man: Red Goblin collects the end of writer Dan Slott‘s run on Spider-Man and features the showdown between Spider-Man and Red Goblin!

The collection features Amazing Spider-Man #794-801

Story: Dan Slott, Christos Gage
Art: Stuart Immonen, Mike Hawthorne, Nick Bradshaw, Humberto Ramos, Giuseppe Camuncoli, Marcos Martin
Ink: Wade Von Grawbadger, Terry Pallot, Cam Smith, Nick Bradshaw, Victor Olazaba, Cam Smith, Marcos Martin
Color: Marte Gracia, Erick Arciniega, Edgar Delgado, Java Tartaglia, Muntsa Vincente
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores on November 12! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon Hardcover
Amazon Paperback
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Excalibur #1

Otherworld is being attacked… by Krakoa’s flowers!? It’s X-Men meets fantasy as Dawn of X gets a new genre to play in.

Story: Tini Howard
Art: Marcus To
Color: Erick Arciniega
Letterer: Cory Petit
Design: Tom Muller

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Absolute Carnage: Miles Morales #1

Absolute Carnage” is engulfing the Marvel Universe and it’s no surprise that Miles Morales is one of the victims. What will Miles do when Carnage’s army goes after the Scorpion?

Story: Saladin Ahmed
Art: Federico Vicentini
Color: Erick Arciniega
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Series collection
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Absolute Carnage: Scream #1

Scream is back from the grave as Absolute Carnage spreads and the call to the symbiotes is too strong.

Story: Cullen Bunn
Art: Gerardo Sandoval
Color: Erick Arciniega
Letterer: Cory Petit
Ink: Victor Nava

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Absolute Carnage: Scream #1

Absolute Carnage: Scream #1

So far, I’ve enjoyed Absolute Carnage. It’s an event that’s done a fine balance into the horror/gore genre without completely crossing a line. It also has been fairly friendly to new readers. Absolute Carnage: Scream #1 continues that balance but tips a bit too much into unfriendly for new readers.

Written by Cullen Bunn, the comic sees the return of Scream, one of the rainbow of symbiotes that exist. The comic does an excellent job of delivering that horror tinge to what is a superhero story at its core. The resurrection of Scream has a nice creepy factor to it. But, the comic relies a bit much on Scream’s past to really be enjoyable.

The art by Gerardo Sandoval helps a bit. Absolute Carnage: Scream #1 has some twisted moments building off of the reader’s imagination. Victor Nava‘s ink, Erick Arciniega‘s color, and Cory Petit‘s lettering help deliver the chaotic nature of the issue. The resurrection scenes have a gruesome quality about them. The New York scenes have some solid panel work that emphasizes the hunt that’s going on. The art, like the other Absolute Carnage issues, is key at delivering the tone of it all.

The comic is good but not great. There’s a reliance on knowing two characters and without that, it lacks the punch to really sell the issue. Still, as it progresses the action will likely be the draw and hopefully more explained. Absolute Carnage: Scream #1 is an interesting piece of the bigger puzzle but doesn’t quite stand on its own yet.

Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Gerardo Sandoval
Ink: Victor Nava Color: Erick Arciniega Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.05 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Target Vader #1

Darth Vader has hunted many who have opposed him. Now, he’s being hunted be a hired band of bounty hunters.

Story: Robbie Thompson
Art: Marc Laming, Cris Bolson
Color: Neeraj Menon, Jordan Boyd, Andres Mossa, Federico Blee, Erick Arciniega
Letters: Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops now and! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle & comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Star Wars: Target Vader #1

Star Wars: Target Vader #1

While we think of Star Wars mainly in its battles between Rebels and the Empire, it’s so much more. The world features so many genres within and some are used more than others. Star Wars: Target Vader #1 shifts from the space opera to more of a crime story focus.

Written by Robbie Thompson, Star Wars: Target Vader #1 has Vader and Palpatine attempting to stamp out a crime syndicate running guns for the Rebels. Business is good though, and the crime syndicate has a mission too. Hire bounty hunters to take out Vader first.

Thompson delivers the first issue as a complete set up of what’s to come. That includes a trope-filled part where we’re introduced to our bounty hunters. You can imagine the movie screen pausing as the bounty hunter’s name pops up and a voice, or lettering, takes you through what they’re known for. That all helps create a different pace than we’d normally expect for a Star Wars story. The beats feel more like a heist story than what we’ve seen in the past.

The personalities make the comic interesting. While the excitement is a bit muted, we get a taste of just how dysfunctional this group will be. It gets you interested in what’s to come.

The art by Marc Laming and Cris Bolson (and a load of colorists) is pretty solid. There’s a nice shift from the normal humans as far as characters and the bounty hunters are varied in style and look. It helps create a ragtag bunch. What’s also nice is there’s enough design at times that characters are familiar. An example is a Jedi hunting droid who will remind you of a past character. Even with similar attributes the character is unique. But, due to the familiarity there’s a built up expectation as far as what the character will be like.

While the issue doesn’t totally excite, it’s more than enough to get you to come back. There’s something fun about Target Vader. It has a style and voice that feels different than what we’ve seen so many times before. It delivers a new reading experience for an established franchise. This is one to check out for Star Wars fans or just comic readers.

Story: Robbie Thompson Art: Marc Laming, Cris Bolson
Color: Neeraj Menon, Jordan Boyd, Andres Mossa, Federico Blee, Erick Arciniega
Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Messages from Midgard #10 – Deadpool Down Under

“War of the Realms” is starting to wind down this week with the release of the penultimate issue of the core series, War of the Realms #5. The comic has a predictable ending thanks to the marketing department, but actually feels like a Jason Aaron/Russell Dauterman/Matthew Wilson Thor comic thanks to its excellent characterization of Thor and Jane Foster to go with fight scenes a la the third act of Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers. The tie-ins aren’t bad either as I wish Journey into Mystery went on for another four issues of road trip hijinks, Greg Pak and Gang Hyuk Lim finally find their sprawling ensemble cast’s footing in New Agents of Atlas, and Captain Marvel and Deadpool wisely choose comedy over melodrama. The only real stinker of the bunch is Tony Stark, Iron Man #12, which made feel really bad for Gail Simone, who has to do the comic book equivalent of walking, chewing bubblegum, and someone else’s calculus homework at the same time.

War of the Realms #5

War of the Realms #5 is paced like a fever dream and a reminder that Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matthew Wilson have done fantastic work on Thor and can tell a poignant story that isn’t just fight scenes stitched together. With the death of the Valkyries and Loki and the capture of Freyja and Odin, this is a real breaking point for Thor and the “War of the Realms” as a whole. Aaron, Dauterman, and Wilson double down on the religious/mythological imagery by having cosmic powered Daredevil nail Thor on the World Tree so he can have some insight on how to defeat Malekith. It’s a big moment for a hero that has been considered “unworthy” for the past five years, and he takes responsibility for all the realms sliding into the role of All-Father and not just a rage-filled, hammer destroying warrior.

Speaking of war, there is quite a lot of it, but Aaron, Dauterman, and Wilson do a good job balancing it with the intense, non-linear Thor/Daredevil/Jane Foster scenes. Even though they feature a variety of locations and characters, the action sequences work because they follow a uniting principle of “liberation”. There are sheer badass moments, like Okoye delivering killer one-liners while the Dora Milaje drive back the angels to Heven, Jane Foster and Roz Solomon watching Roxxon’s stock prices drop while they kick Dario Agger’s minotaur ass, and Captain Britain and Captain America teaming up to drive the Dark Elves back to the English Channel. War of the Realms #5 alternates between triumph and agony and is a treat for fans of the Jane Foster Thor stories as she is inspired by the sacrifice of the Valkyries to continue being a warrior and a hero. With operatic visuals (Especially the Daredevil/Thor scenes.) and its strong character development of Thor, War of the Realms #5 earns an Overall Verdict of Buy.

War of the Realms: Journey into Mystery #4

In its frenetic fourth issue, War of the Realms: Journey Into Mystery enters the pantheon of one of my favorite types of mainstream comics: the fun, quirky B-list cast starring book that ends too soon. We’re talking books like Hawkeye, Mockingbird, Superior Foes of Spider-Man, and Secret Six. The McElroys are definitely hip to the idea that the best comedy comes from character, and it leads to hilarious moments like Wonder Man lamenting his Tommy Bahama shirt being riddled with bullets, the underage Brooklynite Miles Morales having no idea how to act in a casino, and Balder trying to order “sack” aka the favorite drink of Shakespeare’s Falstaff at the casino. As we’ve gotten to know the cast of Journey into Mystery better, the humor level has increased along with the level of general peril.

Yes, Journey into Mystery #4 isn’t all witty banter- it’s a heist story set at a henchpeople convention because the War of the Realms isn’t great for business. Andre Araujo’s diagram-like layouts and Chris O’Halloran’s flat approach to colors gives this issue great flair especially when the heist goes sideways, and a gun fight breaks out. Araujo tilts his grid to give readers a 360 view of the casino floor while the team struggles with what to do as Ares goes mano a mano with Thori. Great jokes, an easy to follow setpiece, a down ending, and the brilliant concept of a henchperson convention earns Journey into Mystery an Overall Verdict of Buy.’

War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #3

Up to this point, New Agents of Atlas has had tons of potential yet has been a little bit of a mess with a huge cast of characters and middle of the road visuals from Gang Hyuk Lim and colorists Federico Blee, Andres Mossa, and Erick Arciniega. However, Greg Pak uses a team meal of spam prepared different ways to unite his Pan-Asian superhero team, and it’s a well-timed breather before Jimmy Woo puts his final plan in motion. Splitting the team into tasks that reflect their strengths finally showcases Woo’s strategic genius, and it also lets us get to know the sprawling cast of New Agents of Atlas before the big finale next issue.

Some character moments that stood out to me in New Agents of Atlas #3 was the growing master/apprentice type bond between Sword Master and Shang Chi and the fact that sexist, elitist Monkey King kept getting his ass handed to him by various team members. There is also a sad, yet relevant scene where the usually cheerful Filipina heroine Wave realizes that Sindr making the water warmer will lead to flooding in Cebu where her grandpa lives. New Agents of Atlas #3 is the issue where Pak and Lim make the majority of these characters seem like people and not interchangeable action figures with cool powers. Also, Amadeus Cho gets one hell of a redemption arc and basically is the Korean-American Wolverine as he fights off swarms of Fire Goblins so the rest of the team can accomplish teir tasks. The art is still too “house style”, the colors are still over rendered, but Greg Pak made me care about this new superhero team in this issue so New Agents of Atlas #3 earns an overall verdict of Read.

Captain Marvel #6

Opening with one hell of action scene from artists Annapaola Martello and Tamra Bonvillain where Bucky and Black Widow take out a group of undead ghouls with some acrobatics and a grenade, Captain Marvel #6 ends up being Freaky Friday with Captain Marvel and Dr. Strange, which is the result of them failing to defeat Enchantress. Writer Kelly Thompson has tons of fun with this premise that works because both Strange and Carol are Type A personalities even if his superpowers are more mental and hers are more physical. Black Widow’s dry sense of humor is on full display for most of the issue as she cuts these two big personalities down to size at least until surrounded by aforementioned ghouls.

The big problem with Captain Marvel #6 is that much of the action is said to take place in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, Brazil, which have metropolitan areas of over 12 million each, but 90% of the comic happens in a fucking jungle. Thompson’s writing is clever, and she nails the dysfunctional personalities of Dr. Strange and Captain Marvel. But, at the bare minimum, she could have read Wikipedia and realized that Brazil is 87.5% urbanized. Despite this huge research faux pas, Captain Marvel is an enjoyable read that doesn’t take itself too seriously, has hilarious faces and well-done action choreography from Martello and Bonvillain, and has an Overall Verdict of Read.

Deadpool #13

I always love when Deadpool has an event tie-in because he always ends up mocking the premise of the event and having a fun, goofy adventure. (Also, because the first Deadpool comic I ever read was a “Secret Invasion” tie-in). Writer Skottie Young and artist Nic Klein take him on a wild ride to Australia where he’s commissioned to liberate the continent/country from Ulik and the trolls with the help of their nation’s finest heroes, Captain Outback, Nuclear Nancy, and copyright friendly Tasmanian Devil. Yep, Young peppers his script with plenty of pop culture references and jokes like having Captain Marvel use Crocodile Hunter dialogue in dream sequence, and “Skottrick” even roasts his own writing when he borrows a one-liner from Terminator and blames it on his kids being home from school.

What makes Deadpool #13 so funny and work has a comic is the blend of silly, irreverent dialogue and detailed art that is played for drama like Klein’s double page tableau recapping what’s been going in the “War of the Realms”. But Klein can do humor too like Negasonic Teenage Warhead’s deadpan expression as Deadpool reacts and laughs at various romantic comedies, or the ending when Deadpool is making jokes about the shittiness of the Hobbit movies while being surrounded by trolls and not having the best allies to help him out. Skottie Young and Nic Klein have a good handle on irreverent Deadpool comedy stylings and have some clever ideas like the trolls enjoying the sparsely populated Australian Outback so Deadpool #13 gets an Overall Verdict of Buy.

Tony Stark, Iron Man #12

I love the idea of Tony Stark fighting a greedy, Smaug-like dragon (Or wyrm. I don’t wanna piss off the fantasy geeks.) and having that fight be written by Gail Simone, who excels at writing smarmy assholes that want to be heroes in spite of it all. (See Catman.) However, Tony Stark Iron Man #12 has to deal with the effects of Dan Slott’s previous arc, introduce the dragon, and have another plot about not having artificial intelligence completely work on technology that affects human behavior. Apparently, in the last arc, Tony Stark relapsed into alcoholism in a virtual reality environment, which honestly just sounds like a weak tea substitute for “Demon in a Bottle”, or a real problem that people experience.

So, Simone and artist Paolo Villanelli are stuck trying to continue that storyline and do a kind of prequel to “War of the Realms”. The idea of Malekith sending a dragon assassin with magical abilities to take out a man of science with quite a large “hoard” is clever and gives an opportunity for Simone to write some Stark snark as he compares the wyrm to Toothless and Falkor. But it’s weighed down by too many subplots. Honestly, this comic would have worked better as a miniseries with Dan Slott continuing his alcoholism/AI/wannabe Black Mirror thing in the main Tony Stark, Iron Man series. It’s safe to say it gets an Overall Verdict of Pass.


With the exception of a bungled Iron Man tie-in, I personally enjoyed this week’s “War of the Realms”, including the core book, which lived up to the pre-release hype of combining the strong arcs and ideas from Jason Aaron’s Thor run with epic Marvel Universe-spanning battles. I’m also going to miss The McElroys when they leave comics and return to their lucrative day job of podcasting and think they would make amazing writers on a humor, character-driven Justice League or Avengers title. Finally, it definitely seems that Skottie Young or someone in the Deadpool office has played Risk because Australia is truly the key to victory…


Panel of the Week

Poor Skottie Young’s kids (Deadpool #13; Art by Nic Klein)

Review: The Avengers Vol. 3 War of the Vampires

Blade has joined the Avengers as a war has broken out within the Vampire nation and Dracula has gone missing!

The Avengers Vol. 3 War of the Vampires includes issues #13-17.

Story: Jason Aaron
Art: Andrea Sorrentino, David Marquez
Color: Justin Ponsor, Erick Arciniega
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores on June 18! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: X-Force #6

X-Force #6

Kid Cable wasn’t the only one who’d come back from the future…!

So what’s Stryfe’s deal? Much like Kid Cable, this Stryfe seems younger and earlier in his reign of destruction. Writer Ed Brisson explores this version of Stryfe in X-Force #6.

The issue shows us events from Stryfe the his MLF’s perspective. Yes, it’s the usual playing with time but Brisson keeps it all pretty smooth and clear. What’s more interesting is we get a Stryfe who’s more than just angry about his existence (is he the clone? is he the original?). In the past, Stryfe was a pretty one-note character. Here, it feels like “Stryfe Year One” as he has that same insecurity as before but also anger towards Apocalypse and a want to prove his worth and rightful position. In some ways he’s depicted as a savior, through his machinations it’s clear he’s not. It’s a more interesting take on the character and through well thought out moments, Brisson adds layers Stryfe has been missing.

The art by Damian Couceiro, with color by Erick Arciniega and lettering by Cory Petit, is interesting. The style isn’t quite the stylized look we’ve seen from the previous issues but there’s something different and charming about it all. The designs are both torn-apocalyptic and clean at the same time. It’s an odd juxtaposition that makes the world a bit more interesting.

The issue is a nice break with an interesting perspective and delivers some answers and a clearer idea as to what has been going on. It also creates some depth to a villain who has been gone for too long and has potential to become a great again. Brisson is putting together something really interesting dipping into the past (and future) while forging new concepts at the same time.

Story: Ed Brisson Art: Damian Couceiro
Color: Erick Arciniega Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 8.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.85 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

« Older Entries