Tag Archives: david stoll

Preview: Pantomime #1

Pantomime #1

(W) Christopher Sebela (A) David Stoll (C) Dearbhla Kelly

Haley and her brother Max are all alone after their mother’s death and a fresh start at Wayfair Academy, a special needs boarding school, isn’t what she expected. Normally, Haley would withdraw back into herself, but when she finds a family with other deaf kids, she embraces her new life and begins to come out of her shell. Until one night where the group dips their toes into crime, and the thrill is too much to leave behind. Though they soon find out by stealing from the wrong person, that this world isn’t for kids. With no one to turn to but each other, they will have to make a choice, one where no one will come out the same on the other side.

Pantomime #1

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle

Mad Cave Studios Announces 4 New Titles and the 2020 Talent Search

Mad Cave Studios‘ virtual event brought forth all sorts of news from the publisher including four all-new titles as well as details on the Mad Cave 2020 Talent Search!

Hollywood Trash

Writer: Stephen Sonneveld, Artist: Pablo Verdugo (Mr. Beaver), Colors: Jose Expósito (Mr. Beaver), Letters: Justin Birch (Knights of the Golden Sun, RV9)
October 7

Ah, Hollywood! Famous for celebs, sun– and murder cults! The Privy Council is the most exclusive club in town, headed by the entertainment industry’s top mogul, a ruthless exec who enlists his famous underlings to kill the people who stole from him, two local garbage men. James and Billy must survive one epic day of sword fights, forest fires, and giant mechs! At least there’s hazard pay. Hollywood Trash​ is five-issues of all-out action and wacky satire!

Hollywood Trash

Villainous

Writer: Stonie Williams, Artist: Jef Sadzinski (Show’s End), Colors: Joana Lafuente, Letters: Justin Birch (Knights of the Golden Sun, RV9)
October 14

Villainous ​follows Tilly, one of the newest super-powered beings to join the Coalition of Heroes through their sidekick program, as she navigates the dizzying world of Super-Heroes. Working with her idols should be a dream come true, but when she learns too much too soon, Tilly’s dream quickly turns into a nightmare. As she learns more about the sordid history of the CoH, Tilly has to make a choice – Get in line and stand with her heroes or take a stand and risk becoming something more… Villainous.

Villainous

Pantomime

Writer: Christopher Sebela (Crowded, Shanghai Red), Artist: David Stoll (Metaphorical HER), Colors: Dearbhla Kelly (Red Sonja, Queen of Bad Dreams)
November 4

Haley and her brother Max are all alone after their mother’s death and a fresh start at Wayfair Academy, a special needs boarding school, isn’t what she expected. Normally, Haley would withdraw back into herself, but when she finds a family with other deaf kids, she embraces her new life and begins to come out of her shell. Until one night where the group dips their toes into crime, and the thrill is too much to leave behind. Though they soon find out by stealing from the wrong person, that this world isn’t for kids. With no one to turn to but each other, they will have to make a choice, one where no one will come out the same on the other side.

Pantomime

Terminal Punks

Writer: Matthew Erman (​Long Lost, Power Rangers, Dark Crystal), Artist: ​Shelby Criswell (The Nib), Letters: Micah Myers (Dead Beats)​
November 11

Four lousy, grimy and greasy gutter punk teens are en route to their big show in the big apple but when things go monstrously wrong and mutant animals are unleashed in the airport, our four punk heroes must put on their combat boots, fly their Black Flag and try to survive a viral genetic mutant nightmare. 

A hilarious, wild, and fun thrill-ride! ​Terminal Punks​ is a blaring colorful love letter to the music and attitude of rebellion. It is also a tongue-in-cheek takedown of rich idiots doing stupid things for bad reasons.

Terminal Punks

The Third Annual Mad Cave Talent Search is Here!

For the third year in a row, Mad Cave Studios is looking to discover and publish new talent in the comics industry. This year is a little different, as three artists and three writers will be chosen to take part in Mad Cave’s first-ever anthology!

Since the first talent search in 2018, Mad Cave Studios has continued the trend of bringing fresh voices to comics with exciting titles like Show’s End, Savage Bastards, Over the Ropes, and many more…

How Do Creators Sign Up?

The Mad Cave Studios talent search has some guidelines you need to follow in order for their editorial team to review your submission. Below is a brief overview of the contest details:

  • Contest runs from June 1, 2020, through September 1, 2020
  • Each submission entered must be set in the universe of a Mad Cave IP (Battlecats, Honor and Curse, Knights of the Golden Sun, Show’s End, etc.)
  • Six Winners (Three writers and three artists) will be announced on Wednesday, October 2nd, 2020, on PREVIEWSworld and PREVIEWSworld Weekly
  • Visit the Mad Cave Talent Search Page for complete submission guidelines
Mad Cave Talent Search 2020

Mad Cave Spotlights What’s Coming in a Showcase May 15

The current pandemic has canceled or postponed conventions around the world leaving comic publishers finding new ways to promote and reveal what’s coming soon for comic fans. Mad Cave Studios has announced the “Mad Cave Showcase” taking place on Friday, May 15th from 12pm to 5pm. The even will be hosted by Jazz Stone.

Join Mad Cave and an all-star line-up of special guests – including acclaimed writers Christopher Sebela (Shanghai Red, Crowded), Matthew Erman (Bonding, Long Lost), as they discuss new projects from within the Cave. Also joining is a bevy of industry veterans to discuss the state of comics. But the fun doesn’t end there, famed artist, Liana Kangas (She Said Destroy) will be doing a live drawing and taking questions.

In an effort to help support Comic Book Retailers around the country, Mad Cave will be promoting and accepting donations throughout the event for Mad Cave’s Go Fund Me Relief Fund for U.S Comic Book Retailers. If you are a comic book retailer interested in taking part in the relief effort, please reach out to contact@madcavestudios.com for more information.

Mad Cave Showcase’s full schedule of events will be as follows:

12 PM EST

  • Welcome to the Show
  • Interview with the writer of Savage Bastards, David Galiano
  • Interview with the writer of Battlecats, Wolvenheart, and more, Mark London
  • Live Giveaway

1 pm EST

  • Interview with Mad Cave’s new editorial members; Steenz, Erica Schultz and Michael Moccio
  • Interview with Christopher Sebela and David Stoll to discuss an all-new project
  • Interview with Matthew Erman and Shelby Criswell to discuss an all-new project

2 pm EST

  • Live drawing with Liana Kangas

3 pm EST

  • State of the industry discussion w/ Chris Arrant & Chris Fernandez
  • Mad Cave Studios Product Showcase

4 pm EST

New comic book teasers and what to expect for the rest of the year

  • 2020 Mad Cave Talent Search discussion and details
  • Live Giveaway
  • Live Q+A
  • Goodbye and thanks for joining us

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

CORPUS: A Comic Anthology of Bodily Ailments Explores Illness, Both Mental and Physical

Launched on Kickstarter, CORPUS: A Comic Anthology of Bodily Ailments is a new comic anthology that explores illness, both mental and physical. The full color graphic novel features over 200 pages and 40 stories.

The graphic novel covers a wide range of topics from peanut allergies to losing an eye, from depression to epilepsy, what it takes to care for a sick person to the stigma of chronic illness.

The creative line-up is impressive:

COVER ART BY: Mark Wang

You can get a digital copy for as low as $12 and items range from your name in the back of the book to comissions.

The project is looking to raise $25,000 and ends on March 4th.

Check out some art from the graphic novel below.