Tag Archives: comixtribe

Review: Wailing Blade #1

The Headtaker, feared executioner and wielder of the legendary Wailing Blade, kills every man who meets his gaze. And, right now, he’s looking at Tychon, an upstart bandit prince fighting to save his father from the chopping block.

Wailing Blade #1 kicks off an action packed fantasy series published by ComixTribe!

Story: Rich Douek
Art: Joe Mulvey
Color: Chris Sotomayor, Jules Rovera
Letterer: Taylor Esposito

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

ComixTribe Shop

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Spencer & Locke 2 #2

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Ascender #2 (Image Comics) – Did you read the first issue? If you did, you know why this is on our list. The follow up to Descender does for magic and fantasy what that series did for sci-fi.

Batman: Last Knight on Earth #1 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo team again for Batman’s final story.

Doomsday Clock #10 (DC Comics) – We’ve already read the issue and this is what we’ve been waiting for. A ho-hum event finally gets good and there’s honestly some fantastic stuff explored here.

Heroes in Crisis #9 (DC Comics) – We’ve already read this one too and while it doesn’t quite stick the landing it is a decent ending to this rocky event.

Killer Groove #1

Killer Groove #1 (Aftershock) – It’s rock ‘n’ roll crime set in the 70s and the mix of music and crime alone has us excited to check this out.

Sham #1 (Source Point Press) – It’s public domain comics rewritten for our entertainment.

She Said Destroy #1 (Vault Comics) – Goddesses and their worshippers battle!

Spencer & Locke 2 #2 (Action Lab: Danger Zone) – This series has been rocking it in its second volume which ups the action and has one hell of a villain.

Star Trek: Year Five #2 (IDW Publishing) – Are you a Star Trek fan? We are, and we’re finally getting our fifth year of the mission!!!

Stranger Things: Six #1 (Dark Horse) – The popular series comes to comics and we’re intrigued to see how comics expands the world and characters.

Superman: Leviathan Rising Special #1 (DC Comics) – This seems like it’s going to be a pretty big deal as far as a storyline.

This Was Our Pact (First Second) – Stand by Me meets My Neighbor Totoro in this astonishing, magical-realist adventure story for middle-grade readers. Yeah, we’re sold on that description.

Voracious: Appetite For Destruction #1 (Action Lab: Danger Zone) – If you haven’t read the previous two volumes, you’re missing out. This series has some solid twists and turns about a chef whose secret incredients are dinosaurs. We’re not ruining it.

Wailing Blade #1 (Comixtribe) – We backed this series on Kickstarter as it reminded us a bit of Battlechasers in the exaggerated fantasy style. It’s some fun action in an oversized first issue.

X-Men: Grand Design – X-Tinction #1 (Marvel) – Ed Piskor continues his amazing take on the X-Men’s history.

ComixTribe’s SINK Vol 1: Welcome to Glasgow is Up on Kickstarter

A forgotten East End district of a warped funhouse mirror vision of Glasgow, Scotland, Sinkhill is a hive of crooks, deviants and killers, and ordinary folk unfortunate enough to live among them.

If killer clowns prowl the streets in a blue van, a shovel-wielding vigilante in a fox mask serves brutal justice after dark, and the last bus home is always full of corpses, well, pal…

You must be in Sinkhill!

ComixTribe has been shaking things up when it comes to comics and comic marketing, especially with their series SINK. Not only have they been creating the usual printed issues (which have sold out and become collectors items) but they have also built buzz with free digital issues before the releases.

Now, the publisher is using Kickstarter to print the first volume of the series. A 160-page perfect bound collection, there’s a few different options to get the trade. Not only does it feature the comics but also pin-ups, galleries, bonus tales, and more… plus a soundtrack to listen to while you read!

As I said, they’re willing to do things differently and on their campaign you can find a download to the first issue for free and there’s also a “money back guarantee.”

If you’re a fan of horror, this is a must get from a company with a proven record for delivery.

The campaign runs through April 24th so don’t delay.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

30 Days of Night #1 (IDW Publishing) – A reimagining of the classic horror series.

Assassinistas #1 (IDW Publishing) – Mom’s an assassin who spent her sons’ tuition on new guns. Guess the son needs to get a job helping mom! Quirky concept, sounds like a lot of fun.

Backways #1 (AfterShock) – Writer Justin Jordan does Harry Potter… which is intriguing.

Catalyst Prime: Accell Vol. 2 #2 (Lion Forge Comics) – Lion Forge continues to entertain and their speedster is full of excitement and energy.

Catalyst Prime: Summit #1 (Lion Forge Comics) – A new entry in Lion Forge’s Catalyst Prime universe. Any new release, we’re intrigued and must check it out.

Curse Words: Holiday Special (Image Comics) – Have you been reading Curse Words? If not, you’re missing out.

Dark Ark #4 (AfterShock) – A new take on Noah’s ark, but this is the other arc, with all of the monsters. The last issue pivoted the series and we’re excited to see what’s next.

Dark Nights: Metal #4 (DC Comics) – Holy crap, holy crap, holy crap.

Fence #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue was amazing. The series is a western take on sports manga. It’s so good!

Hellboy: Krampusnacht #1 (Dark Horse) – Hellboy does Christmas. Nuff said.

Marvel Two-In-One #1 (Marvel) – If you’ve never read an issue of this classic series, it’s a lot of fun. Here’s hoping this new one captures that of the original.

Rom & the Micronauts #1 (IDW Publishing) – Two properties coming together. We’re intrigued.

Sink #3 (ComixTribe) – Maybe the most disturbing comic series of the year?

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #15 (Marvel) – If you don’t know Aphra, you’re missing out. Think Indiana Jones but in Star Wars.

Star Wars: Poe Dameron #22 (Marvel) – Filling in the gaps of the Star Wars universe.

Tales of Suspense #100 (Marvel) – Another classic Marvel title returns! This one’s exploring the “death” of the Black Widow.

Transformers: Optimus Prime #14 (IDW Publishing) – Optimus vs. Dinobots.

Transformers: Till All Are One Annual 2017 (IDW Publishing) – Wrapping up this series, one that’s been full of political intrigue and giant robots.

Quantum and Woody (2017) #1 (Valiant Entertainment) – If you’ve never read Quantum and Wody, you’re missing out. A new series that’ll get you to laugh.

X-Men: Grand Design #1 (Marvel) – Ed Piskor takes on the X-Men.

 

ComixTribe’s Sink #2 Has Already Sold Out

ComixTribe is an indie publisher that has been one to watch when it comes to their marketing and their series regularly sell-out resulting in hard to find comics. The publisher has announced that Sink #2 has already sold out before it’s released November 8.

Sink #1 was released late last month and the comic solid out through the first printing (which caused retailers to reach out about exclusive special edition variants). The comic was released AFTER the order for Sink #2 were due, so, combine an under the radar comic with a first issue sell-out and a convoluted ordering system and you get a hot comic. Mix in a low print run and you’ve got a comic that’s often harder to find than the first.

Due to buzz from the first issue an a big advance order for Sink #2 has already come in and that’s that, the first printing is sold out. There’s still a few issues for retailers to order through their distributor though.

Long story short, if you want Sink #2 it’s best to hit up your comic shop and place one in your pull box.

ComixTribe Announces Their Next Comic, Wailing Blade

ComixTribe is a small press publisher who keeps their line of comics small choosing to to flood the market. So, it’s always interesting to see what the publisher has coming up. The company has announced their next comic series, Wailing Blade.

Written by Rich Douek with art by Joe Mulvey, and colors by Jules RiveraWailing Blade is a dystopian horror fantasy series, a type of comic ComixTribe hasn’t released before.

 

 

 

 

 

The company won’t even solicity a series in the direct market until 75% or more is complete, no release date has been announced.

Review: Sink #1

sink_001-coverAccording to the press release, Sink will be a series of standalone offbeat crime stories all linked by the location; that of Sinkhill, a forgotten East End district of a warped funhouse mirror vision of Glasgow, Scotland. Sinkhill is a hive of crooks, deviants and killers, and ordinary folk unfortunate enough to live among them.

There’s something refreshing about reading a standalone story that’s somewhat exhilarating, especially one such as this because you don’t know if you’re ever going to come across these characters again in another story, or if this is their one and only appearance, and that adds a genuine level of tension to the story in the series debut issue.

Sink #1 isn’t typically the kind of comic that I’d normally gravitate toward, but there was something about the setting that drew my attention, and I’m glad that it did.

John Lees crafts a fantastic story that touches on the twisted underbelly of Glasgow, with some characters that feel just like they walked off the streets (well in some cases, at least). Alex Cormack‘s art couldn’t be better suited to this comic, and his ability to bring forth the grim uneasiness that pervades Sinkhill’s streets really gets the comic under your skin.

If you’re looking for an excitingly fresh, albeit brutal, story then you need look no further than Sink. 

Story: John Lees Art & Colours: Alex Cormack
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

ComixTribe provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

3 Questions to Answer When Building a New Publishing Line

by Tyler James

Five years ago, if you told me I’d be publishing children’s books, I would have laughed in your face.

But if you also told me that the children’s book line would quickly grow to over six-figures in sales annually, I’d stop laughing.

And then I’d ask, “How the hell did you do it?”

Last week, Eisner-nominated writer Jason Ciaramella, artist Greg Murphy and I launched the 4th Kickstarter campaign for the C is for Cthulhu brand of Lovecraft-themed books and products, published by ComixTribe.

Our previous three campaigns, all successful, combined for over $120,000.00 on Kickstarter, supported by more than 2,800 backers.

Though we had high hopes for this latest campaign for a new book Sweet Dreams Cthulhu, a Lovecraftian bedtime story, even we were amazed that it has surpassed our previous campaign funding record in just 8 days.

The endurance and continued success of the C is for Cthulhu brand, as well as our ability to continue to grow and expand it to new heights, has caused me to reflect on a few of the things that we did right.

I’m sharing this article in hopes that other aspiring publishers and brand builders can follow in our footsteps.

Three Important Questions to Ask Before Launching Your Publishing Line

What follows are three important question you should ask yourself before launching a new publishing line.

And if your line is already underway, but maybe it hasn’t quite taken off yet, stop what you’re doing and answer these questions now.

Questions 1: Who exactly do you want to entertain? (The more specific, the better!)

To be perfectly honest, prior to launching the C is for Cthulhu brand with Jason and Greg, I had never read anything by H.P. Lovecraft and couldn’t even pronounce Cthulhu.

Jason, on the other hand, was a huge horror fan, and knew that there would be a market for a Lovecraft-themed alphabet book for all-ages, especially one that was exceptionally well-done.

While 99% of parents out there are like me and can’t pronounce Cthulhu, the 1% that can still leaves a market of hundreds of thousands of potential customers for us to sell to.

And what we’ve discovered about the Lovecraft/horror geek parents market is that they are, as Russell Brunson describes in his excellent new book Expert Secret, “irrationally passionate” about cool books and products when they find them.

And because of that, they share them with the 2-3 other Lovecraft fans that they know.

Who share it with their friends, and so on.

Now, before you dismiss the rest of the advice I have because you’re thinking, “Well, sure, you’re just building upon an existing brand (Lovecraft) so of course you were successful,” a few things…

First, no question about it, it’s easier to build on top of something that already has an existing fan base.

That was true for Robert Kirkman with zombies, it was true for Stan Lee with superheros, and it was true for Walt Disney with animated cartoons.

Second, while it’s true that Lovecraft stuff in particular does well on platforms like Kickstarter, simply throwing cthulhu in your campaign is no guarantee for success.

(I can point to about a dozen campaigns that failed this year with that strategy.)

The key is to plant your seed in already fertile soil and grow something new, different, and remarkable.

And that’s what’s the C is for Cthulhu line has turned out to be.

Question 2: How will you consistently reach that market?

Once you’ve found clarity on who it is you want to entertain, it’s your job to go out and find them and put your book in front of them.

If you’re waiting for your market to find you, you’ll be disappointed.

Because even though word of mouth from your existing fans and excitement and energy pumped up during a big Kickstarter campaign is important, to build an enduring brand, you need to have a plan for the other 92% of the year when you don’t have a Kickstarter going.

Our strategy outside of Kickstarter launches has been stupid simple.

But it’s also a strategy that’s involved doing two things that many young publishers are 100% dead set against doing:

  1. Giving away the product for free.
  2. Spending money on advertising.

Virtually every single day since that first successful Kickstarter has launched, we’ve given away free copies of the original C is for Cthulhu: The Lovecraft Alphabet Book in exchange for an email address.

Click here to get the original board book.

To date, the book has been downloaded more than 22,000 times.

What’s powered that has been an absolute commitment day in and day out to advertising on the Facebook platform.

This single advertisement, for example, has been running for months and reached over 100,000 people:

Most new publishing lines are reluctant to give their books away for free (even digitally) and don’t have the stomach to commit to advertising.

And I get that.

But I also know that a big part of the reason…

  • Our Facebook page has over 25,000 fans…
  • We sell books every single day on Amazon and on our CisforCthulhu.com online store…
  • We’ve made deals with multiple international publishers for foreign translation rights for our books…
  • Every single Kickstarter launch is bigger than the last…

…is because we’ve never stopped trying to grow our audience.

We get our books in front of new potential fans every single day.

Question 3: How can you get a quick win, and then stack your launches?

Now, once you’ve identified the market you’re going to entertain and found a way to get in front of them (preferably every single day, rain or shine) the next thing to do is to launch.

Kickstarter, in 2017 is the #1 platform in the world for creatives of all types, but especially comic creators, children’s book publishers, writers, and artists.

On the ComixLaunch podcast, for over 90 episodes, I’ve shared the mindset, strategies and tactics that work on the platform.

But the platform is always evolving, so I recently put together a brand new guide including 7 innovative strategies creators have used this year to get funded.

So, getting that first launch under your belt and making it successful is key.

And that’s what we did with the C is for Cthulhu Board Book Kickstarter.

But what many publishers make the mistake of doing is making their next launch for a completely different book or project… when 99% of your potential audience still hasn’t read that first book yet!

Instead, stack it.

Our second Kickstarter was for a C is for Cthulhu plush toy

But we sold hundreds more copies of the original board book during that campaign…

And we also sold hundreds more copies on Amazon that month because of increased awareness for the brand during that launch..

And our third Kickstarter was for a C is for Cthulhu Coloring Book

You guessed it, we sold hundreds more copies of the original board book and hundreds more plush toys during that launch as well.

And the coolest part?

Because we had an audience and we communicated with that audience regularly, we knew our launches were going to be successful before they began…

Because we were just making products that our audience told us they wanted.

And so, here we are, 10 days into our latest launch for SWEET DREAMS CTHULHU, and we’re already thinking ahead to the next one.

So, there you have it… three questions you need good answers to find success:

  1. Who do you want to entertain? (Be specific!)
  2. How will you reach them? (Every single day!)
  3. What will you launch first and then how will you stack? (And then stack again!)

The clearer your answers to those questions, the more successful your publishing line will be.

P.S. Interested in Kickstarter? Don’t forget to grab the New Free Strategy Guide – The Top Kickstarter Strategies of 2017.


Tyler James shares the lessons he’s learned managing ten successful Kickstarter projects supported by 6,000+ backers and raising more than $280,000.00 in funding on the weekly ComixLaunch podcast. Tyler is the writer of Kickstarter-funded comics and graphic novels including (The Red Ten, Oxymoron, Epic), and the co-creator and publisher of ComixTribe, an internationally distributed comic, graphic novel publishing company. He also runs the C is for Cthulhu Lovecraft-themed children’s book imprint that was successfully launched on Kickstarter and whose latest book SWEET DREAMS CTHULHU is on Kickstarter right now!

Tyler has also designed and produced award-winning learning games for companies like National Geographic and McGraw-Hill. He has an M.Ed in technology, innovation and education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Contact Tyler via email (tyler.james@comixtribe.com), follow him on Twitter (@tylerjamescomic) and subscribe to ComixLaunch at ComixLaunch.com or on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.

Review: Sink #1

sink_001-coverAccording to the press release, Sink will be a series of standalone offbeat crime stories all linked by the location; that of Sinkhill, a forgotten East End district of a warped funhouse mirror vision of Glasgow, Scotland. Sinkhill is a hive of crooks, deviants and killers, and ordinary folk unfortunate enough to live among them.

There’s something refreshing about reading a standalone story that’s somewhat exhilarating, especially one such as this because you don’t know if you’re ever going to come across these characters again in another story, or if this is their one and only appearance, and that adds a genuine level of tension to the story in the series debut issue.

Sink #1 isn’t typically the kind of comic that I’d normally gravitate toward, but there was something about the setting that drew my attention, and I’m glad that it did.

John Lees crafts a fantastic story that touches on the twisted underbelly of Glasgow, with some characters that feel just like they walked off the streets (well in some cases, at least). Alex Cormack‘s art couldn’t be better suited to this comic, and his ability to bring forth the grim uneasiness that pervades Sinkhill’s streets really gets the comic under your skin.

If you’re looking for an excitingly fresh, albeit brutal, story then you need look no further than Sink. 

Story: John Lees Art & Colours: Alex Cormack
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

ComixTribe provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

The Comics Are All Right: Break the Marketing Mold

sink-1While many are discussing the spiral death of the comic industry excuses as to the cause seem to vary depending on the position the person is in. Store owners often blame publishers for putting out too much, not marketing enough, incorrect pricing, lackluster product, a broken preordering system, and more. Indie creators focus on an antiquated distribution system, a market too focused on a few publishers, fans unwilling to take a chance. Fans blame stores for not reading their minds and ordering what they want, publishers for the product, creators who fight with fans.

In reality, it’s not one thing, it’s many that lead to the ups and downs of the comic industry.

But, there are some who are bucking the system. Creators who are talking directly to fans. Publishers who are going around the current distribution system. Stores who are finding customers and building their own communities.

There are roughly 284,163,264 individuals interested in comics according to Facebook demographics. That’s a large group of folks to advertise directly to. Stores, like Third Eye Comics in Maryland, are doing just that with engaging advertising to get folks to come to their store. Three years since I first covered Third Eye’s fantastic ad program they’re still going strong, so it must be working for them, right?

When I started these columns, I didn’t just want to highlight problems of the industry, I wanted to spotlight those who are doing things that go around the system and pave their own path like Third Eye Comics.

A prime example of this entrepreneurial attitude is ComixTribe headed up by Tyler James who recently spoke to us about Kickstarter and the things the publisher is doing there. The publisher definitely is blazing their own path working within and outside of the current system to create their own corner of comicdom and doing so by building a community.

Their latest project to break the mold is Sink. The series by writer John Lees, artist Alex Cormack, letterer Colin Bell has done its own thing to build its audience.

First: A series of emails to the ComixTribe list teased the new series

Second: After a series of teasers the comic’s first issue was given away for FREE to the dedicated email list. ComixTribe often gives away free first issues to incentivize individuals to join their list.

Third: A limited amount of print copies were released primarily at conventions.

Fourth: A Kickstarter has been launched to fund an offset printing for the comic before it’s released to mass markets later this year.

330 individuals, and $3,300 above the goal raised as of this article being published, the Kickstarter and marketing plan is a success.

But, the email list could have been it to build a promotion. ComixTribe has gone an extra step with what I see as a rarity this day, a physical mailing. It feels like far to few publishers and creators take advantage of a cheap communication platform like email, but to see one send out a physical mailing is impressive, to say the least.

comixtribe-1 comixtribe-2

You think this is would be a pretty big outlay right? Some Google search has each postcard pegged at about 30 cents a piece. A 5,000 person mailing would cost about $1,500. With the postcards just hitting mailboxes, the return on investment most likely hasn’t been seen… yet, but the project is already above its goal.

If 5,000 individuals seems like too few individuals for your $1,500 investment, that same amount of money on Facebook gets you about 63,000,000 views of individuals who said they are interested in comics. If 1% of 1% of those views take action, that’s 630 new Kickstarter pledges, almost double the current amount of individuals pledged for this project.

With ComixTribe, what we’re seeing is a new type of marketing being used, one that bucks the press release, blog, individual, shop, dynamic that’s dominated the industry. And by doing this sort of hard work, ComixTribe is building their own community, one that will follow them through ups and downs and the market and most importantly, they can talk to directly.

ComixTribe might be a small publisher, but their ideas are pretty big, and they’re showing the industry you don’t have to beholden to the current paradigm, you can create your own and find success.

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