Tag Archives: Comics

Wes Craig and Toby Cypress Deliver Horror in The Gravediggers Union

Deadly Class co-creator Wes Craig launches an all-new series with artist Toby Cypress in The Gravediggers Union, a horror series—chock-full of steroid zombies, monster gods, swamp vampires, ghost storms, and space monkeys—set to launch this November.

The Gravediggers Union is the story of Cole, Ortiz, and Haley, three members of a brotherhood who bury the dead in the day and make sure they stay buried at night. The supernatural world has gone haywire, and it’s all tied to a powerful cult called The Black Temple. They want to unleash ancient dark gods and bring about the end of mankind. At the centre of their plan is Morgan, prophet of the coming apocalypse and Cole’s estranged daughter. Can Cole save his daughter? Can the Gravediggers save mankind? And do we even deserve to be saved?

The Gravediggers Union #1 (Diamond Code SEP170600) will be available in stores on Wednesday, November 1st. The final order cutoff from retailers is Monday, October 9th.

Image’s Dark Fang Takes a Bite Out of Climate Change

Writer Miles Gunter and artist Kelsey Shannon will launch their ecological action series Dark Fang this November from Image Comics.

When Valla lived, she was a fisherwoman. In death, she is a vampire, peacefully residing on the bottom of the ocean—until a mysterious dark plague descends upon her aquatic paradise.

Searching for answers on the surface, Valla finds a world headed toward an environmental collapse that will ultimately wipe out her food supply. Now, to stay fed, she must take on the juggernaut that is the global fossil fuel industry.

Climate change deniers beware: Dark Fang is coming.

Dark Fang #1 (Diamond code: SEP170613) arrives in stores Wednesday, November 15th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, October 23rd.

Myths Become Rallying Cries in Coyotes from Sean Lewis and Cailtin Yarsky

Writer Sean Lewis and rising-star artist Caitlin Yarsky will launch their new series Coyotes this November from Image Comics.

Women are disappearing. A legion of wolves roam the border, hunting them down, and a band of survivors have come together, ready to wage war.

Detective Frank Coffey is struggling to wrap his head around this mythic-level bloodbath when he meets Red, a little girl with a secret—and a sword.

Coyotes #1 (Diamond code: SEP170611) arrives in comic shops Wednesday, November 8th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, October 16th.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: Dark Nights: Metal #1 (DC Comics) – Snyder and Cappulo back on a Batman book that will have huge repercussions and changed for the DC universe. Hell yes!

Southern Bastards #17 (Image) – This book doesn’t come out often enough, and I’m only complaining because it’s so damn good.

Aquaman #27 (DC Comics) – This has been such a good arc with incredible art and I can’t wait to see where it goes.

All-New Guardians of the Galaxy #8 (Marvel) – This has been such a pleasant surprise to me and a lot of fun. Duggan knows how to tie the ridiculousness with action so well on Deadpool, and he brings that to this series.

Astonishing X-Men #2 (Marvel) – A really solid first issue that hit the nostalgia home run much more than Gold did for me. The ending teased something huge but I’m sure that was just a trick by a certain character.

 

Brett

Top Pick: American Way: Those Above and Below #2 (Vertigo) – Jon Ridley alone is enough to get me looking forward to this series but the first issue knocked it out of the park having me excited to read the second.

Catalyst Prime Superb #2 (Lion Forge Comics) – The first issue was solid and delivers on Catalyst Prime’s promises. I want to see where this second one goes to see if it can continue the positive direction of the entire line.

Future Quest Presents #1 (DC Comics) – A new anthology-ish series that continues the adventures of some of my favorite childhood characters.

Motor Girl #8 (Abstract Studios) – Easily the best comic on the market. It mixes humor and feels in a way no other comic is doing. Just utter perfection and the one I look forward to each and every month.

Sh*t My Presidents Says: Illustrated Tweets of Donald Trump (IDW Publishing) – Shannon Wheeler’s cartoons that bring President Trump’s tweets to life are collected in this book. It’s both funny and… sad.

Atomahawk Gets a Collected, Deluxe, Oversized Edition from Image

Image Comics has announced that the fan-favorite story Atomahawk by Donny Cates, Ian Bederman, and Taylor Esposito will be collected into a deluxe, full-color, oversized edition and available this October.

First serialized in Heavy Metal magazine, Atomahawk is the out-of-this-world adventure of the Cyberzerker and his mighty Atomahawk. Readers will join them on their quest to free their imprisoned God.

Atomahawk #0 (Diamond Code AUG170545) will be available in stores on Wednesday, October 11th. The final order cutoff from retailers is Monday, September 18th.

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 8/6

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.

 

Ryan C

Redlands_01-1Redlands #1 (Image)** – Not sure what to make of this one yet. On the one hand, Vanessa R. Del Rey’s free-flowing and expressive artwork is gorgeous, and Jordie Bellaire’s colors are always top-notch. It’s as a writer, however, that Bellaire clearly has something of a learning curve ahead of her — plunging us into the middle of the action right off the bat, we never learn many of the characters’ names, have no clue as to their motivations, and frankly, beyond some sort of siege on a redneck sheriff’s station, we don’t even get much of an idea of what’s going on, never mind why. The creators seem to have an admirable agenda that they’re working towards here, but they have a long way to go to get readers invested in it and at $3.99 a pop, I simply wasn’t given a clear enough idea of the basic premise of this comic to justify sticking with it. Overall: 4. Recommendation: Pass.

 The Divided States Of Hysteria #3 (Image)** – Whoever’s still left reading Howard Chaykin’s latest will find this installment to be something of a bummer as very little happens by means of plot progression, and all we get is a re-hash of the few particulars we already know. Okay, everyone’s a bastard — we get that much. Beyond that, all this issue does is run in place. Still love Chaykin’s art and Ken Bruzenak’s one-of-a-kind lettering and effects, though. Overall: 5. Recommendation: Buy if you’ve come this far, pass if you haven’t.

Unholy Grail #2 (Aftershock)** – I’m really digging Cullen Bunn and Mirko Colak’s revisionist take on the Arthurian legend, and like the first issue, this one successfully “time-jumps” around to fill us in on all the particulars in a breezy, rapid-fire manner. Colak’s lavish artwork is definitely the star of the show here, but the script does what it needs to in order to maintain your interest, as well. Overall: 7.5. Recommendation: Buy.

Grass Kings #6 (Boom! Studios)** – Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins wrap up the first arc of their series in fine style as the showdown between our drop-outs and local law enforcement comes to a head, with potentially far-reaching consequences for all parties involved. There’s some great character development in this issue, and Kindt delivers at least one genuinely touching moment, all aided and abetted by Jenkins’ gorgeous and moody watercolor art. Overall: 8. Recommendation: Buy.

Patrick

 Kill Or Be Killed #11 (Image)** – And here we are, right back where we came in, with the fight in #1. Although our guy Dylan is trying to get his life back together, get back on his meds, catch up on his schoolwork, go to a party with his ex, his demon just won’t let him be. Nothing spectacular, just a solid issue that sets up the third arc quite nicely. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy.


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Image/Skybound Entertainment reveals September Lorenzo de Felici Variants

Image/Skybound Entertainment introduces Italian comic artist Lorenzo De Felici to the United States market in a big way with Skybound’s line-wide variant covers which will hit stores this September.

De Felici is the artist of a new, soon-to-be-announced, ongoing Skybound series sure to be a major hit with fans and critics alike upon its launch.

The Walking Dead #171 by Robert Kirkman, Charlie Adlard & Cliff Rathburn, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUN178584) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 6th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, August 14th.

Birthright #26 by Joshua Williamson, Andrei Bressan & Adriano Lucas, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178585) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 13th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, August 21st.

Gasolina #1 by Sean Mackiewicz, Niko Walter & Mat Lopes, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178586) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 20th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, August 28th.

Invincible #140 by Robert Kirkman, Ryan Ottley & Nathan Fairbairn, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178587) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 20th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, August 28th.

Manifest Destiny #31 by Chris Dingess, Matthew Roberts, Tony Akins & Owen Gieni Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178588) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 27th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, September 4th.

Kill the Minotaur #4 by Chris Pasetto, Christian Cantamessa, Lukas Ketner & Jean-Francois Beaulieu & Lukas Ketner, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178589) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 20th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, August 28th.

Horizon #14 by Brandon Thomas, Juan Gedeon & Mike Spicer, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178590) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 20th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, August 28th.

Redneck #6 by Donny Cates, Lisandro Estherren & Dee Cunniffe, Cover B by De Felici (Diamond Code JUL178591) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 27th and the final order cutoff for retailers will be Monday, September 4th.

Review: Kill or Be Killed #11

Killed or Be Killed #11 kicks off with a tantalizing flash-forward of our protagonist Dylan as a millennial Charles Bronson in the Death Wish sequels in a brutal action sequence that the series opened up with. However, this is just a tease from Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser, and the comic settles down to poke around Dylan’s mental state and hint at the tiniest slivers of redemption before taking a sharp, violent left turn in its final scenes. This lull, then storm plot structure makes for entertaining reading as Brubaker and Phillips make Dylan a likable young man trying to get his friend Kira back, pass grad school, and find some semblance of normal in his life until he decides to kill again.

Kill or Be Killed #11 definitely looks at the “psychological” part in psychological thriller, and there’s an extended scene where Dylan half lies and half tells the truth to his therapist, who reprimands him for going off his meds. Breitweiser’s colors sink to a nice medium palette, and Phillips draws Dylan’s body language as moving away from his therapist instead of listening to what he has to say. It’s nice to see Dylan working on his mental health, but his lack of engagement with his therapist and lies to him makes it seem like he’s just trying to tick off a box on a list and return to “normal” without dealing with the consequences of his murders. Dylan isn’t contrite at all; he just wants to avoid the consequences of his actions, which is why it’s hilarious that he wears a Richard Nixon mask to his friend Kira’s Halloween party towards the end of the issue.

Brubaker, Phillips, and Breitweiser continue to make the reality of the demon that supposedly saved Dylan’s life and forces him to kill fairly ambiguous with a couple pages done in pulpy, painted art style showing that his father’s artwork of the creature. Nonetheless, like clock work, Dylan gets deathly ill two months after he killed a Russian mob member and his drug dealer, and the cause isn’t just undercooked falafel. But he doesn’t immediately go into vigilante mode until he hears a young man in a Russian accent asking for his friend Kira and her “boyfriend” Dylan at a coffee shop, and the demon never speaks to him in Kill or Be Killed #11. The ending of the issue started to really make me question the “devil made me do it” motivation for Dylan’s actions and returns to the desperate final issues of the second arc where Dylan was just out to save his own ass through violent, yet sloppy means. Just when readers start to like Dylan more, he goes off and murders someone.

Ed Brubaker continues to treat Dylan’s mental health with empathy without justifying his actions in the slightest. Sean Phillips and Elizabeth Breitweiser kick in a little romance and add more light to their usual shadowy art when Dylan interacts with Kira, and the story shifts gears from Death Wish meets Zodiac to a less insufferable early Zach Braff film with two young people rekindling a spark in Greenwich Village after dealing with a host of relationship issues. That tone is short lived when Dylan gets sick, and the art becomes more painterly and apocalyptic. There’s a tension between wanting Dylan to feel better, not wanting him to kill again , and a third, liberating door that it’s an imbalance in brain chemistry telling him this. It’s a moral muddle, and Dylan’s own internal struggle is more riveting and infinitely more relatable than the Russian gangsters on his tail.

After an insanely compelling and action master class of a cold open, Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser so straight slice of life for most of Kill or Be Killed #11 examining Dylan’s post-vigilante motivation and relationship with Kira. But cue the last few pages, and the comic is back to be one hell of (a heavy on the anti) an antihero with a Richard Nixon mask starring thrill ride. (Fingers crossed that he runs into someone in a Hunter S. Thompson outfit at next issue’s costume party.

Story: Ed Brubaker Art: Sean Phillips Colors: Elizabeth Breitweiser
Story: 8.0  Art: 9.5 Overall: 8.8  Recommendation: Buy 

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Psychedelic Space Tale Void Trip Takes Off this November

Writer Ryan O’Sullivan and artist Plaid Klaus will launch their all-new sci-fi/comedy series Void Trip this November. The series will be published by Image Comics.

Ana and Gabe are the last two humans left alive in the galaxy. They’re low on fuel, they’re low on food, and they’re low on psychedelic space froot, but they’re high on hope and determined to make it to their promised land: the super-planet Euphoria, a true hippy paradise.

This is a road trip like no other. Come along for the ride and meet the friends and enemies they make along the way, and see how the universe responds to those who dare to live freely within it.

Void Trip #1 arrives in comic shops Wednesday, November 22nd. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, October 30th.

Review: The Wicked + the Divine #30

WicDiv30CoverThe Wicked + the Divine #30 is definitely a setting up the pieces on the game board issue from Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson with unlikely allies Woden and Cassandra putting the finishing touches on their literal plot moving machine. However, most of WicDiv #30 is dedicated to Dionysus, Baphomet (finally), Morrigan, and other members of the Pantheon talking out their feelings. Gillen, McKelvie, and Wilson have built up these characters over several years, and it’s novel and nice to see new sides of them before all hell breaks loose.

One of the coolest parts of WicDiv #30 is that the entire power trio of the Morrigan appears, including the violent Badb and the underutilized Gentle Annie. The trade off between sweet and sad, harsh and loud, and something crazy in-between reminded me a lot of a three piece femme punk band I recently called The Coathangers where the lead guitarist does melodic vocals and the drummer does growls. (She would probably shoot off crows if she was a WicDiv character.) Even though Gentle Annie is the one who finally relents and let Dio and Baphomet chat, she is creepy as hell and basically predicts Dio’s death with a kind smile. He is the most decent member of a very corrupt Pantheon, is starting to have feelings for Urdr, and was torn to pieces by the Titans in classical mythology so it seems like his demise is imminent. Like Gentle Annie says, “Only so much of ickle Dio to go around.”

Luckily, before his possible death, Dionysus gets to be the most supportive friend ever and try to talk Baphomet through the fact that he is part of an abusive relationship although Baph wards off any serious talk with quips and bad puns about British political parties. His evasion is fleshed out visually by McKelvie, who draws him with sunglasses in stark contrast to Dio’s open, honest eyes in the midst of negative space. Baphomet is closed off and too bonded to Morrigan, who has been manipulating him ever since she made him into a member of the Pantheon instead of just a Goth fuckboy version of the Valkyries. The flashback to him joining the Pantheon is just plain tragic along with his almost nihilist resignation to his current fate. Gillen and McKelvie handle Baphomet’s relationship situation in a thoughtful manner and focus on his pain, how he is sadly deflecting it, and not the sexy Goth-ness of him and Morrigan.

IckleDio

While Dio and Baphomet are having a heart to heart in the Underground, McKelvie and Wilson make a two page sort of return to the superhero genre when Baal and Amaterasu accidentally “bust” Sakhmet, who is actually a fangirl. This little scene provides some comic relief in the middle of a pretty tough and foreboding WicDiv #30 with a close-up reaction shot of Minerva, who is the Oracle to Baal’s Batman, freaking out taking the cake. The sequence also show that the sky gods are still a little bit delusional and think that everything can be fixed by capturing Sakhmet and Woden’s big ol’ machine, which definitely has its red flags like being powered by a physically and emotionally wounded Dionysus and Woden installing high tech spy cams on the other Pantheon members’ bling.

WicDiv #30 shows that even right before an impending apocalyptic event, Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson still take time to have readers listen and empathize with the Pantheon members’ emotions and problems. They also continue to use the highly stylized trappings of the Pantheon to shed light on real world problems, like abusive relationships. Even though they’re fictional, I care about Dionysus and Baphomet like they are real people and hope for the best for them. But, knowing WicDiv‘s past approach to characters with softer edges (RIP Fangirl Laura and Inanna) that won’t likely be the case.

Story: Kieron Gillen Art: Jamie McKelvie Colors: Matthew Wilson
Story: 8.5 Art: 8 Overall: 8.2  Recommendation: Buy 

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
« Older Entries