Tag Archives: chris visions

Review: Trust Fall #1

Trust Fall #1

Who doesn’t love heist movies? They usually have some “team getting together” montage which does character introduction and gives the audience a feel of what the story is about.

One of my favorite movies is The Italian Job, both the original and the remake. Both movies tell an elaborate story and have more than its share of cheeky moments.

These type of stories give their audiences an escapade in a world foreign to most. The type of gusto required to pull off some of these antics is more than the average civilian has.

Which is why when I saw the movie Jumper I was surprised they didn’t try to make it a heist movie. Hayden Christiansen’s character has the power to jump in and out of places miles and even countries apart. The opportunist would ask why didn’t he steal anything? In Christopher Sebela and Chris VisionsTrust Fall #1, we meet one crime family whose life work for thievery recently has led to some fatal consequences.

We meet Ash Parsons, the mastermind in a family whose main business is crime. We meet her in the middle of a job where she walks in nonchalantly and robs her victims right in front of them without blinking. She escapes the police and joins the family for dinner where we meet an unsavory collection of shady figures. These are the members of Ash’s family as she gathers them there to give them the good news. Her latest heist has them set for life.

Overall, Trust Fall #1 is a nice origin story to this character and the world she commands. The story by Sebela is relatable, funny, and action-packed. The art by the creative team is unique and stellar. Altogether, you’ll love this story if you like crime noir books and love it even more if you always root for the underdog.

Story: Christopher Sebela
Art: Chris Visions, Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou, Claire Roe
and Dylan Todd
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Preview: Coda #12

Coda #12

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Simon Spurrier
Artist: Matías Bergara
Colorist: Michael Doig
Letterer: Jim Campbell
Cover Artist:
    Main Cover: Matías Bergara
    Intermix Cover: Chris Visions
Price: $3.99

The story of Hum and the Nag comes to a close.

Coda #12

Take a Trust Fall with Christopher Sebela and Chris Visions this June

Ash Parsons was raised to believe she’s special. As someone with a quirk of genetics that lets her teleport things, she’s the golden goose of her family.

Her family is the foundation of a struggling criminal outfit trying to get ahead in the world and Ash is able to pop out whole fleets of cars and entire bank vaults. But while she can teleport valuables and her accomplices, she can’t teleport herself — making every job a trust fall with her family there to catch her and escort her to safety. It’s a perfect setup but as things begin to change and the Parsons move up in the world, Ash will find herself pushing back against her golden cage, with deadly results.

Written by Christopher Sebela with art by Chris Visions, Trust Fall #1 is out June 12, 2019 from AfterShock. The first issue features a cover by Visions and a 1:10 incentive cover by Claire Roe.

Trust Fall #1

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Spider-Gwen Vol. 6 The Life of Gwen Stacy

Lost in the multiverse with existence on the line. Wracked with guilt and willing to reveal her identity to the world. There’s a lot in volume 6 in Spider-Gwen by Jason Latour, Robbi Rodriguez, Chris Visions, Rico Renzi, and Lauren Affe.

The trade collects issues #30-34.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Vol. 1 Arrives in December

A dizzyingly talented roster of noncompliant creators, joining forces with series creators Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine De Landro, will release the first trade paperback collection of Bitch Planet: Triple Feature this December.

Ripped directly from the world of Bitch Planet, a crack team of creators spin 15 teeth-clenching tales of rage, revolution, and ridicule. Patriarchy beware…this sci-fi kidney punch can’t be stopped!

Within the pages of Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Vol. 1, readers can enjoy the writing talents of: Cheryl Lynn Eaton, Andrew Aydin, Conley Lyons, Che Grayson, Danielle Henderson, Jordan Clark, Alissa Sallah, Dylan Meconis, Kit Cox, Marc Deschamps, Sara Woolley, Vita Ayala, Bassey Nyambi, Alobi, Nyambi Nyambi, Jon Tsuei, and Matt Fraction, and delight in the artistic stylings of Dylan Meconis, Sara Woolley, Maria Fröhlich, Joanna Estep, Craig Yeung, Sharon Lee De La Cruz, Ted Brandt, Ro Stein, Naomi Franquiz, Alec Valerius, Vanesa R. Del Rey, Mindy Lee, Rossi Gifford, Chris Visions, Saskia Gutekunst, and Elsa Charretier.

Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Vol. 1 (Diamond code: OCT170620, ISBN: 978-1-5343-0529-8) hits comic book stores Wednesday, December 13th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, November 6th.

Preview: X’ed #4

X’ED #4

Written by: Tony Patrick
Illustrated by: Ayhan Hayrula, Brian Level
Colored by: Doug Garbark
Lettered by: Jim Campbell
Cover by: Chris Visions
In Stores: January 18

A staff member from the X’ED Initiative is injected into the Innerverse with the aim of retrieving and saving subliminal hitman Colin McClure from certain death. Meanwhile, Colin himself confronts the real nemesis lurking beneath a patient’s consciousness and unleashes an unconventional solution to all of her past traumas. The creative team of Tony Patrick and Ayhan Hayrula are joined by Chris Visions (Dead Letters) and Brian Level (The Mantle) for this breathtaking actioner that melds unbridled adventure with mindbending ideas.

xed-4-1

Preview: Lucas Stand #6 (of 6)

Lucas Stand #6 (of 6)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers: Kurt Sutter & Caitlin Kittredge
Artist: Jesús Hervás
Cover Artist: Chris Visions
Price: $3.99

Final issue! Lucas jumps into the future for the first time and discovers what the influencer demon’s plans will lead to.

lucasstand_006_a_main

Preview: Dead Letters Vol. 3 TP

Dead Letters Vol. 3 TP

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Christopher Sebela
Artist: Chris Visions
Cover Artist: Chris Visions
Price: $14.99

After expanding the gang war through the boroughs and into every area of Here, Sam Whistler is faced with a choice: Does he attempt to unite the various factions under one banner to claim independence for the land known as Here, or does he search for God, and with that, perhaps a way back home? Writer Christopher Sebela (Welcome Back, High Crimes) and artist Chris Visions (Constantine: The Hellblazer, Scarlet Witch) conclude their supernatural crime epic. Collects issues #9-12 for the first time in print.

DeadLetters_v3_Cover

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