Tag Archives: carole maurel

Search for Hu banner ad

Preview: Waves HC

Waves HC

Publisher: Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer:  Ingrid Chabbert
Artist: Carole Maurel
Translator: Edward Gauvin
Letterer: Deron Bennett
Cover Artist: Carole Maurel
Price: $14.99

After years of difficulty trying to have children, a young couple finally announces their pregnancy, only to have the most joyous day of their lives replaced with one of unexpected heartbreak.

Their relationship is put to the test as they forge ahead, working together to rebuild themselves amidst the churning tumult of devastating loss, and ultimately facing the soul-crushing reality that they may never conceive a child of their own.

Based on author Ingrid Chabbert’s own experience, coupled with soft, sometimes dreamlike illustrations by Carole Maurel, Waves is a deeply moving story that poignantly captures a woman’s exploration of her pain in order to rediscover hope.

Waves HC

A First Look at Waves from Ingrid Chabbert, Carole Maurel, and BOOM!

BOOM! Studios has unveiled a first look at Waves, a new hardcover original graphic novel on-sale in May 2019 that poignantly captures a woman’s exploration of pain and loss. Waves is a deeply moving story based on author Ingrid Chabbert’s own experiences trying to conceive, with art by Carole Maurel.

After years of difficulty trying to have children, a young woman and her wife finally announce their pregnancy, only to have the most joyous period of their lives become one of unexpected heartbreak. While drowning in an ocean of sorrow following their loss, the young couple begin a journey of renewal and hope as they learn to live and love again.

Making her graphic novel debut with Waves, Ingrid Chabbert is the author of nearly sixty children’s books and continues to excite audiences of all ages worldwide. Artist Carole Maurel first worked in animation before devoting herself to comics full-time, drawing critical acclaim for her 2018 graphic novel Luisa: Now and Then.

Waves will be available for sale on May 1, 2019 at local comic book shops and May 07, 2019 at bookstores.

Waves from Ingrid Chabbert, Carole Maurel, and BOOM! Studios comes to shelves February 2019

BOOM! Studios has announced Waves, a new hardcover original graphic novel on-sale in February 2019 that poignantly captures a woman’s exploration of her pain in order to rediscover hope. Waves is a deeply moving story based on author Ingrid Chabbert’s own experiences trying to conceive, with art by Carole Maurel.

After years of difficulty trying to have children, a young couple finally announces their pregnancy, only to have the most joyous day of their lives replaced with one of unexpected heartbreak. Their relationship is put to the test as they forge ahead, working together to rebuild themselves amidst the churning tumult of devastating loss, and ultimately facing the soul-crushing reality that they may never conceive a child of their own.

Making her graphic novel debut with Waves, Ingrid Chabbert is the author of nearly sixty children’s books and continues to excite audiences of all ages worldwide. Artist Carole Maurel first worked in animation before devoting herself to comics full-time, drawing critical acclaim for her 2018 graphic novel Luisa: Now and Then.

Waves will be available for sale on February 27th, 2019 at local comic book shops and March 5th, 2019 at bookstores.

Review: Luisa: Now and Then

The hardest thing one must come to realize about one’s self is either you must take the path put upon you or you take a path of your choosing. This is not as easy as it sounds and it never is. I remember when I was in high school I had no desire to join the military. The only plans I had was to hopefully get a basketball scholarship and go to a college where I can get a college degree. This all changed when one morning. In my high school, they told all seniors to report to the school library where we all had to take the ASVAB test and as they say, “the rest is history”.

Now more than 20 years later those same dreams I had looks like a “fantasy” compared to what my life has been. I don’t regret any of it but I can only imagine where my life would have gone if I had taken a different path. I can only imagine for many of my friends in high school how different their worlds would have been, if they have gone the route I went. In Carole Maurel’s (adapted by Mariko TamakiLuisa: Now and Then one such young lady grapples with self-acceptance and sexuality as the protagonist is presented as a teenager and as a 32-year-old.

We meet Luisa at 15 years old and 32 years old, on a seemingly ordinary day, as both are intertwined. Both selves of Luisa are in the same time and space. Her older self has just realized who she is with the help of a friendly stranger. Slowly the older Luisa starts to put the details together as her younger self had been hiding a part of herself in her diary that she is secretly in love with a girl. What follows is an actual series of talks between her 15 year old self and her 32 year old self. Not everything is going as good as one would hope as the fact that they occupy the same time and space is starting to influence both. By book’s end, Luisa not only accepts who she is. Luisa knows who she is and loves freely.

Overall, an excellent book which tackles identity, sexuality, family pressures, and love in all its splendor. The story by Maurel is funny, relevant, poignant, and fascinating. The art by Maurel, is sumptuous, naturalistic, and elegant. Altogether, a book that gives time travel fans a prolonged scene in 273 pages of the sequence fans of Back To The Future II we would have liked to seen between the younger and older versions of Elisabeth Shue’s Jennifer seeing herself.

Story: Carole Maurel Art: Carole Maurel Adapted by: Mariko Tamaki
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Luisa: Now and Then

The hardest thing one must come to realize about one’s self is either you must take the path put upon you or you take a path of your choosing. This is not as easy as it sounds and it never is. I remember when I was in high school I had no desire to join the military. The only plans I had was to hopefully get a basketball scholarship and go to a college where I can get a college degree. This all changed when one morning. In my high school, they told all seniors to report to the school library where we all had to take the ASVAB test and as they say, “the rest is history”.

Now more than 20 years later those same dreams I had looks like a “fantasy” compared to what my life has been. I don’t regret any of it but I can only imagine where my life would have gone if I had taken a different path. I can only imagine for many of my friends in high school how different their worlds would have been, if they have gone the route I went. In Carole Maurel’s (adapted by Mariko TamakiLuisa: Now and Then one such young lady grapples with self-acceptance and sexuality as the protagonist is presented as a teenager and as a 32-year-old.

We meet Luisa at 15 years old and 32 years old, on a seemingly ordinary day, as both are intertwined. Both selves of Luisa are in the same time and space. Her older self has just realized who she is with the help of a friendly stranger. Slowly the older Luisa starts to put the details together as her younger self had been hiding a part of herself in her diary that she is secretly in love with a girl. What follows is an actual series of talks between her 15 year old self and her 32 year old self. Not everything is going as good as one would hope as the fact that they occupy the same time and space is starting to influence both. By book’s end, Luisa not only accepts who she is. Luisa knows who she is and loves freely.

Overall, an excellent book which tackles identity, sexuality, family pressures, and love in all its splendor. The story by Maurel is funny, relevant, poignant, and fascinating. The art by Maurel, is sumptuous, naturalistic, and elegant. Altogether, a book that gives time travel fans a prolonged scene in 273 pages of the sequence fans of Back To The Future II we would have liked to seen between the younger and older versions of Elisabeth Shue’s Jennifer seeing herself.

Story: Carole Maurel Art: Carole Maurel Adapted by: Mariko Tamaki
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Humanoids Announces a New Literary Imprint, Life Drawn Focused on Personal and Political Narratives

Humanoids is launching a new literary imprint in 2018, timed to the company’s 20th anniversary of publishing its acclaimed books in the United States. Best known for seminal genre works including The Incal (Alejandro Jodorowsky, Mœbius) and The Metabarons (Jodorowsky, Gimenez) and internationally renowned creators, including Milo Manara and Jose Ladronn, Humanoids will make a bold break from tradition with its new endeavor. Launching on April 4th, the Life Drawn imprint will publish graphic novels featuring deeply personal and powerful political narratives; these are stories grounded in life on earth, not among the stars.

Life Drawn’s debut season features titles representing a wide spectrum of art styles, tone, and social and cultural perspectives:

Kabul Disco: How I Managed Not to Be Abducted in Afghanistan by Nicolas Wild
Publication date: April 4, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594658686; 160 Pages; $19.95
LIFE DRAWN debuts with the first volume of a satire-laced travel memoir by cartoonist Nicolas Wild about his experiences in Afghanistan, drawing an adaptation of of the Afghan constitution. Wild provides insights into international politics, a war-ravaged country and the lives of his fellow expatriates. In a dazzling passage, Wild explores the fragile state of American democracy through the story of a woman who was working for the Bush campaign in 2000 and was responsible for vote counting in one of Florida’s three counties, ultimately making the fateful phone call that helped swing the election. Acclaimed cartoonist Guy Delisle (Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea) declares that Wild’s “satirical and at times absurdist perspective plunges us into the daily life of a group of expatriates in the heart of Kabul, a city still reeling from the last war. His witty sense of humor makes him an excellent travel companion.” Book Two will be published in September.

Vietnamese Memories: Leaving Saigon by award-winning writer and artist Clément Baloup
Publication date: May 29, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594656583; 164 Pages; $19.95
The first of a three-volume testimonial to the courage and endurance of five different families displaced from their native country by war and colonialism and forced to assimilate in unfamiliar lands, watching their heritage slowly disappear. As Doan Hoang, the award-winning director of Oh, Saigon, says in her introduction of Book One, “History is mostly told by the privileged and powerful, and rarely by those who are most affected. . . . In this sumptuously beautiful and important graphic novel, you will intimately bear witness to what so few in the world have been privy to.”

Luisa: Now and Then by Carole Maurel, Adapted by‎ Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer)
Publication date: June 20, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594656439; 272 Pages; $29.95
A queer transformative tale about self-acceptance and sexuality, written and illustrated by Carole Maurel and adapted by national bestseller Mariko Tamaki, Caldecott Award–winning creator of This One Summer. A disillusioned photographer has a chance encounter with her lost teenage self who has miraculously traveled into the future. Together, both women ultimately discover who they really are, finding the courage to live life by being true to themselves. The book will be published in June, timed to Pride Month.

Madame Cat by Nancy Peña
Publication date: July 4, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594658136; 128 pages; $12.95
Hilarious vignettes presenting the love, laughter and frustrations of a pet who thinks she’s an owner! With narrative mastery, creator Nancy Peña brings us bite-sized sketches that appeal to cat lovers of all ages.

Almost American