Tag Archives: bryan lee o’malley

Oni Press Announces New Editions of Scott Pilgrim Celebrating 15 Years

Next year marks the 15th anniversary of the release of the bestsellinScott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life, so it’s leveling up! On April 10, 2019, Bryan Lee O’Malley’s notorious Scott Pilgrim returns to print with three individual color collections as well as a box set of the three collections with art by Bryan Lee O’Malley, colored by the Joe Shuster Award-winning creator, Nathan Fairbairn.

The New York Times bestselling series and basis for the movie Scott Pilgrim vs. The World  is now available in a new full-color softcover format! This Color Collection Box Set contains all six volumes of the award-winning series in three massive books that might wreak havoc on your bookshelf. But the memories will be worth it! Laugh as slacker Scott Pilgrim tries and sometimes fails to get his life together and win the heart of the literal girl of his dreams, Ramona Flowers! Cry when things look bleak for our heroes! Make a confused face at the countless Canadian references! (Unless you live in Canada already.) The perfect gift for a Scottoholic—or for anyone discovering the bestselling series for the first time.

Scott Pilgrim is an Oni Press classic, and is recommended for teen and adult readers new to comics. The box set is priced at $89.99, with the individual collections at $29.99.

Unboxing: Ramona Flowers Collectible Figure (Mondo Exclusive)

An American expatriate, ninja delivery girl, and traverser of subspace, Ramona Flowers is the object of Scott Pilgrim’s love. Too bad she’s got 7 evil exes he must defeat.

The Ramona Flowers Collectible Figure, from the Scott Pilgrim comic series, is based on the art of creator Bryan Lee O’Malley, featuring 7 points of articulation, and has interchangeable accessories!

We open up and show off the Mondo Exclusive version, which includes an interchangeable Scott Pilgrim in Subspace Suitcase accessory.

Is this figure as awesome as the comic it’s based off of? Find out!

You can order your own now.

Review: Snotgirl #7

After a six-month break, Snot Girl & Co are back in action. Snot Girl #7 is the second book in arc two, which ended with Charlene (Sunny’s new girlfriend), “falling” off the top of a building on New Year’s Eve. Issue #6 gave us some clues as to the general shape of this arc: lots of back story, and an ever-expanding cast of characters.

In issue #7, Caroline “Coolgirl” joins the crew in what Lottie calls “friendtegration”. At the same time, Charlene wakes up from her coma and the “fashion police” continue their off-the-books investigation. All three storylines give us more Virgil, whose status is more slippery than yards of fake silk. By the end of the issue, the girls are well on their way to San Diego for a mid-con blogger party. Charlene may or may not have revisited the scene of her fall as well as Caroline’s strange origins (see issues 1-4). Either way, her plastic surgery does NOT go as planned, and yes, that was most definitely Virgil performing “physical therapy”.

While creators Leslie Hung (artist) and Bryan Lee O’Malley (writer) call this a new arc, it’s certainly worth reading the first five issues before diving in. Arc One built a solid foundation of character connections. It may not be heavy on plot, but the inner-workings of Hung and O’Malley’s cast is almost impossible to explain in summary.

Snot Girl is a fascinating exercise. It took me a while to jump on the train, but now I don’t know what life would be like with Haters Brunch. I think that has a lot to do with Hung and O’Malley’s character-heavy story. I come away from every issue feeling like I’ve gotten a behind the scenes peek at the internet elite, which is, frankly, all I’ve ever wanted in life. Reading Snot Girl is like reading trashy paparazzi magazines, without the guilt of invading a real person’s privacy.

Hung’s artwork, too, is masterful. I would flip through lookbooks by her for hours, if they existed. (hint. Do the thing.) There is something delightful about the “classic” manga style applied to an undeniably American setting. The application may or may not lend itself to a comment on our fetishization of all things Japanese, especially considering the consumerist themes of the book itself. Thanks to Hung, our fashion-conscious cast never wears the same thing twice. It’s easy to believe that these girls have overstuffed closets in their tiny apartments, and that each item they put on has been carefully curated before they even consider walking out the door.

If I knew these people in real life, I would hate them, and you probably would, too. However, kept at the safe distance of “being fictional”, and dressed in what can only be described as the weirdest (and yet coolest?) couture I’ve ever seen, I can’t wait to find out what kind of trouble they get themselves into next.

Story: Brian Lee O’Malley Art: Leslie Hung Color: Rachael Cohen
Lettering: Maré Odomo Cover Color: Jason Fischer
Story: 8.5 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy!

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Snotgirl #6 is Rushed Back to Print

The sixth issue of the bestselling Snotgirl by Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung is being rushed back to print in order to keep up with overwhelming customer demand.

Snotgirl #6 begins a new story arc, and this month spring is the season for mystery, madness & mucus as Lottie meets her adoring public, Coolgirl has a change of heart, and readers learn more than they ever wanted to know about Cutegirl!

From the creator of Scott Pilgrim, Snotgirl follows Lottie Person, a glamorous fashion blogger living her best life—at least that’s what she wants you to think. The truth is, she’s an allergy-ridden mess who may or may not have killed somebody.

Snotgirl #6, 2nd printing (Diamond Code JUN178448) will be available on Wednesday, August 23rd. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, July 31st.

Papergirl Press Launches The Pushpin and we talk to Jessica Johnston about It

Toronto’s Papergirl Press has launched The Pushpin, a curated website of collectible, high-quality giclée prints for sale by acclaimed graphic novel artists — including Kate Beaton, Johnnie Christmas, Michael Cho, Valentine De Landro, and Jeff Lemire — and acclaimed editorial illustrators Julia Breckenreid, Dani Crosby, Chloe Cushman, Jay Dart (as his alter-ego Granduncle Jiggs), Sarah Lazarovic, and Christian Northeast. The site will also launch with Pushpin Originals — prints of new and never-before-seen art created specifically for The Pushpin by Kagan McLeod, Ryan North, and Chip Zdarsky. Prints currently available from the Pushpin range in price from $25 to $150.

The Pushpin is a project of Papergirl Press, a small printing company in Toronto committed to working exclusively with independent artists, run by former journalist Jessica Johnston.

At launch, The Pushpin will feature more than 40 prints including:

  • King Baby by Kate Beaton;
  • 2 Pisces prints by Johnnie Christmas;
  • Pee Wee Herman’s loafers, rendered by Sarah Lazarovic
  • A Sweet Tooth and an Essex County print by Jeff Lemire;
  • 3 Kagan McLeod prints including a portrait of Prince and a Pushpin Original History of Hip Hop;
  • 2 Pushpin Original prints by Ryan North;
  • 3 Chip Zdarsky pieces, including a Sex Criminals print and a Pushpin Original print entitled The Solar System: The Graphic Guide to Our Universe.

Artists who will have work on the Pushpin in the coming months include Bryan Lee O’Malley, Marguerite Sauvage, and illustrator Gordon Wiebe.

Photo credit: Steve Murray

We got a chance to ask Johnston about the launch and what we can expect and you can see the art below!

Graphic Policy: So how did the idea of The Pushpin come about?

Jessica Johnston: The idea came about late last year, after I left my job as a newspaper editor. (Print media is a bit of a freaky place to be in 2016.) I planned to freelance and do contract work, which I did, but I also started doing prints for my husband, comic creator Chip Zdarsky. He wanted to start doing regular prints, and the first was called “Bat-Hero,” a kind of meta joke about knock-off action figures of copyrighted characters. I bought a professional printer, and started making Bat-Heroes from our dining room. And I really loved doing it. The prints looked so good, I wanted to keep making more. But of course, there’s only so much one Chip can do. That’s when I decided I wanted to build a website for more artists to make work available for sale. So I guess the whole thing started with a bat-joke!

GP: How long have you been working on this project?

JJ: I began seriously planning The Pushpin at the beginning of this year. I knew a lot of incredible illustrators from my work in journalism, so I approached them first. I found people were pretty enthusiastic about the idea of having a trusted venue for producing high-quality prints of their work.

GP: It’s an impressive list of creators to launch. How’d they come to be involved?

JJ: I already revealed the secret to landing my first creator client, and that’s a decade of common-law marriage. Compared with that, the others were a breeze. All of the artists on board for the launch are from Canada, and most of those are from Toronto, which is where I live. There’s a lot of talent here, and it’s a small enough place that you just get to know people just through moving in media and arts circles. Some of the creators, like Ryan North, were already pals, and others, like Jeff Lemire, I introduced myself to because of this project.

GP: You previously worked in journalism at a newspaper as an editor. What has surprised you the most in working within the comic world?

JJ: Nobody lines up to meet journalists at conventions!

GP: The site includes comic artists and editorial illustrators. Do you notice anything different in what they’ve contributed?

JJ: There’s a surprising amount of overlap between comic work and editorial illustration — many artists do both. I love that we have comic work and illustration side by side, and we are giving both the fine-art treatment. I think there are more commonalities between the two forms than differences. Both tend to be pretty playful, and much of the work on The Pushpin has a good sense of fun. Where else can you find a high-quality giclée print of Pee Wee Herman’s white loafers? Sarah Lazarovic, who did that piece, is a genius of simple, lovable work, with just the right amount quirkiness. Then you have an incredible comics pro like Michael Cho, whose work on the site is mostly personal stuff, which is quiet and beautiful. He does these lovingly rendered portraits of Toronto’s back alleys that I can’t get enough of.

GP: How does the contributions work? Do you suggest ideas or is this all the artists?

JJ: It’s the all the artists. Once I’ve determined that someone is a good fit for The Pushpin, they have creative freedom. I like to think of myself as a kind of artistic matchmaker – connecting artists and the people who respond to their work to each other. And a big part of that is letting the artist be the artist. I trust that whatever they come up with, there are people out there who are going to love it.

GP: Seven decades plus and it feels like comics are still debated as legit art (video games suffer from the same issue). Do you see things like this raising that debate at all?

JJ: I like to think we’re past that, even though I know it’s still a challenge. I couldn’t be more thrilled to be treating comic art and illustration with the respect they deserve. There is so much incredible work happening in both areas, it’s crazy to ignore or dismiss it. Kagan McLeod is a great example of someone who does both illustration and comic work, and his stuff is mind-blowing, it’s so good. He has a piece on The Pushpin called Herc — a portrait of the guy often credited with inventing hip hop, and he’s made up of smaller portraits of famous rappers. You have to see it to believe it — it’s amazing. So ambitious, and perfectly executed. Any of the individual portraits could be in a gallery.

GP: The initial artists are all Canadian and you’ll be expanding from there. Is there any particular reason you started with just Canadians?

JJ: I decided to start near home when approaching artists, and work my way out. I am pretty lucky that felt in no way limiting. Jeff Lemire, Kagan McLeod, Ryan North, Sarah Lazarovic, Julia Breckenreid, Valentine de Landro, Michael Cho… they are all basically neighbours. I do look forward to expanding The Pushpin’s borders, though, because, really, there’s so much great talent everywhere.

GP: Do you know what the release schedule will be like for future releases? Is it a set schedule? And will any of these go out of print?

JJ: I have some artists lined up to come on board in the coming months, Bryan Lee O’Malley and Marguerite Sauvage among them, but I’ll be adding people on a rolling basis. Like the work itself, the number of prints is up to the artist. Some are unlimited, and some are capped. Jeff Lemire, for instance, has two prints on The Pushpin, a Sweet Tooth and an Essex County one. There will only be 100 of each of those, so if that’s what you’re after, you better get one quick!

GP: Thanks so much! And check out some of the art below!

Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Card Game Box Art Revealed

Oni Press today revealed the official box art illustrated by creator Bryan Lee O’Malley for Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Card Game, an innovative deck-building game by Keith Baker and Renegade Game Studios.

Create your perfect life with Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Card Game available for purchase in hobby stores and comic book shops Summer 2017. This deck-building game will have an MSRP of $45, is designed for 2-6 players to enjoy in 45-60 min. per game, and will captivate gamers ages 13 and up.

Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Card Game from Renegade Game Studios and Oni Press

Renegade Game Studios and Oni Press are bringing Scott Pilgrim to tabletop games. Scott Pilgrim‘s Precious Little Card Game is an innovative deck-building game by Keith Baker and based on the graphic novels by Bryan Lee O’Malley. Baker focused on the detail to stay true to the heart of the series, something fans will appreciate.

Being a grown-up is HARD and maybe not worth it? You might rather spend time tweaking your band’s set list until it’s guaranteed to get you that big gig opening for legit rockstars. Perhaps you’re better off dating someone a bit younger than chasing a fairytale romance with the age-appropriate girl (or boy) you met at a party. Maybe the drama constantly engulfing your pals feeds you, even if it is bringing your friends down. And don’t adults just sit at desks all day worrying about how bread makes you fat? Do adults ever even get attacked by random robot ruffians determined to pick a fight? Huh. Maybe there is something to getting it together…

Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Card Game is a deckbuilding game that challenges you to grow up and prepare for your finest hour. Players assume the roles of their favorite characters in the Scott Pilgrim universe, each of whom comes with a unique starting deck. Innovative double-sided cards let you decide whether to solve your problems with hard work and empathy, or whether to embrace the unpredictable world of gratuitous video game violence.

Beyond the video-game-style combo moves unique to each character, fans will also appreciate the innovative double-sided cards. Players will be faced to make hard choices about whether to fight or upgrade their life with each card placed into the Plot line. Defeating the Evil Ex and collecting Power-Ups will help players inch their way towards victory.

Create your perfect life with Scott Pilgrim‘s Precious Little Card Game in hobby stores summer 2017. This deck-building game will have an MSRP of $45, is designed for 2-6 players to enjoy in 45-60 min. per game, and will captivate gamers ages 13 and up.

Madison’s Favorite Comics of 2016

Last year I prioritized cutting back on cape books and diversifying the publishers and stories that I read. Though many of the comics I read weren’t published in 2016 (especially ones I read during Women’s History Month) I still found it hard to narrow down the list of ongoing series I particularly loved throughout the year.

Here are ten comics I couldn’t put down in 2016:

goldie vance #1 featured

10. Goldie Vance by Hope Larson and Brittney Williams

This is a series I would have loved as a child. Goldie is the perfect mix of Nancy Drew and Eloise (of Plaza fame). Goldie Vance is great for a younger audience but doesn’t shy away from emotionally complex stories. Goldie and her friends are well-rounded characters with a wide range of interests who readers–young and not-young alike–will be able to relate to.

elasticator #1 featured

9. Elasticator by Alan C. Medina and Kevin Shah

Elasticator is the kind of smart, political superhero comic I wish was more prevalent. The writing is fresh and interesting and Shah’s art is lively and animated with great colors from Ross A. Campbell.

Snotgirl

8. Snotgirl by Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung

Lottie Person is just about as far away from Scott Pilgrim as you could get, though they do, at times, share a similar self-absorption. Snotgirl quickly became one of my favorite series of the year, because while not many people can say they’re successful fashion bloggers, they can likely relate to Lottie’s personal problems. Leslie Hung and Mickey Quinn provide gorgeous, vibrant visuals and the best wardrobe in comics, to boot.

welcome back 1 featured

7. We(l)come Back by Christopher Sebela and Claire Roe

Reincarnation? Check. Assassins? Check. Shadowy organizations? Check. A+ fashion choices? Check. Reincarnated assassins in love running from other assassins who are trying to assassinate them? …Also check. What more can you want from a story?

shutter #18 featured

6. Shutter by Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca

Shutter is one of Image’s most underrated titles. The story follows Kate Kristopher, the daughter of legendary explorer Chris Kristopher, and her discovery of some little-known family history. The comic is consistently interesting not only because of its plot, but because del Duca and colorist Owen Gieni are constantly experimenting with narrative structure and using different techniques to influence how the story is read.

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5. Clean Room by Gail Simone and Jon Davis-Hunt

Clean Room is a creepy psychological horror comic about journalist Chloe Pierce’s investigation of self-help master Astrid Mueller, who Pierce suspects is more cult leader than anything else. Or is she? Mueller is a fascinating character, and the unknowable question of which side she’s actually on only adds to the story’s suspense.

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4. The Wicked + The Divine by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie

What if you could be a god, but you’d die within two years? Consistently equal parts entertaining and heartbreaking with consistently incredible art and color from Jamie McKelvie and Matt Wilson. You’ve probably heard of this one.

mockingbirdyas

3. Mockingbird by Chelsea Cain, Kate Niemczyk, Sean Parsons, and Ibrahim Moustafa

One of the few superhero comics I read this year, Mockingbird was one of my absolute favorites. Cain writes Bobbi Morse as confident and smart, and the result was a fun mystery thriller with gorgeous art. The series also featured some of my favorite colors and covers this year, by Rachelle Rosenberg and Joelle Jones.

By the time I write my 2017 list, I might be over Mockingbird’s cancellation.

bitch planet 2 b

2. Bitch Planet by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Val DeLandro

2016 was light on Bitch Planet–only four issues were released throughout the year–but continued to provide insightful and relevant commentary in what turned out to be a period of rapid change in the real-life political landscape.

monstress-7-featured

1. Monstress by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda

Monstress started strong in 2015 and only got better. The main character, Maika, is a teenage girl living with a monster inside, something she learns to live with and use to her advantage as the plot develops. Monstress is full of unrepentant female characters set in a stunningly rendered fantasy world.

Snotgirl Wipes Away Competition this July

Snotgirl the new Image Comics series by New York Times bestselling writer Bryan Lee O’Malley and featuring dazzling artwork by newcomer Leslie Hung will launch this July.

In Snotgirl #1, readers will meet Lottie Person. Lottie’s a gorgeous, fun-loving social media star with a seemingly perfect life—but deep-down is she really just a gross, allergy-ridden mess? Enter a world of snot, blood, and tears in this new ongoing series.

Snotgirl #1 Cover A by Hung (Diamond Code MAY160544) and Cover B by O’Malley (Diamond Code MAY160545) will hit comic book stores on Wednesday, July 20th.

SNOTGIRL 1

Get Ready to Fall in Love with Jonesy

This February, BOOM! Studios is smitten with Jonesy, the new limited series from heartbreakers Sam Humphries and Caitlin Rose Boyle. Perfect for fans of Giant Days, Scott Pilgrim, and the new Archie, this lighthearted comedy features a teen cupid in plaid who misuses her “love powers” as she tries to find her place in high school.

Jonesy is a self-described “cool dork” who spends her time making zines nobody reads, watching anime, and listening to riot grrrl bands and 1D simultaneously. But she has a secret nobody knows: she has the power to make people fall in love! Anyone, with anything. She’s a cupid in plaid. There’s only one catch—it doesn’t work on herself. She’s gonna have to find love the old-fashioned way, and in the meantime, figure out how to distract herself from the real emotions she inevitably has to face when her powers go wrong.

Jonesy #1 (of 4) arrives in comic shops on February 10th with a main cover by series artist Caitlin Rose Boyle for the price of $3.99 under Diamond order code DEC151095. Announced earlier today, a second “Final Order Cutoff” variant cover by Bryan Lee O’Malley and Jason Fischer is now available the price of $3.99 under Diamond order code DEC158102. Also available in a limited quality is a retailer incentive cover by Lissa Treiman.

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