Tag Archives: ariana maher

Review: Going to the Chapel TPB

Going to the Chapel TPB

Going to the Chapel is the type of comic that when you finish, you immediately dream of it being on the big screen. It’s the type of story that’s a hell of a wild ride. Writer David Pepose delivers a story that’s Tarantino in nature with twists and turns that are off the wall on a Looney Tunes sort of way.

Going to the Chapel focuses on a wedding that’s broken up by a robbery that goes wrong. Of course, there’s more to it than that and that’s part of the fun. Over the four issues, the situation gets more out of hand as the police surround the church and the guests decide they’ve had enough. A wedding gone wrong is an understatement as to the experience.

Pepose delivers winks and nods throughout the series making sure the story never gets too serious. With some solid banter and jokes throughout, the comic will put a smile on your face. There’s absurdity throughout and so much coming out of the blue. It catches you off guard and hits the right notes. It’s a hell of a lot of fun.

Gavin Guidry nails it on the art. With colors by Liz Kramer and lettering by Ariana Maher and Colin Bell the art ups the humor of the situation. The style and art nail the moments and adds to the absurdity. Looks on faces and the body language is at times is all it takes. The situation and the visuals combine to get you to laugh. It’s the small details that really help and deliver the jokes. Pepose’s writing is solid but the art is what makes the pacing of some of the dialogue delivery. Everything is just so over the top it’s hard to not have fun and just smile at the chaos.

Going to the Chapel is a mashup between Kevin Smith and Tarantino and the result is so much entertainment. I often joke that it seems like very comic is now optioned and in this case, I want this story to be. It’s a great comic and would be a fantastic fun film. If you like the heist gone wrong genre, this is a must get. If you just like a damn good comic, you can’t go wrong with this.

Story: David Pepose Art: Gavin Guidry
Color: Liz Kramer Letterer: Ariana Maher, Colin Bell
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Action Lab provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Going to the Chapel TPB

GOING TO THE CHAPEL TPB

Written by David Pepose
Art by Gavin Guidry
Colors by Elizabeth Kramer
Lettering by Ariana Maher
Cover by Gavin Guidry
$14.99 | 108 pgs. | Action Lab: Danger Zone | T+ | On sale FEB. 19

The funniest crime romcom in comics gets collected in the trade paperback of GOING TO THE CHAPEL, from Ringo Award-nominated writer David Pepose (Spencer & Locke) and rising star artist Gavin Guidry (The Death Defying) at Action Lab: Danger Zone! Emily Anderson is a wealthy bride-to-be grappling with a serious case of cold feet — but before she can speak up, her wedding is hijacked by the bank-robbing Bad Elvis Gang. But when this smash-and-grab spirals into a full-blown standoff with the police, Emily will become the unlikely ringleader of her own hostage situation in order to decide where her happily ever after truly lies. Fans of Sex Criminals, Crowded, Assassin Nation, The Fix, and 4 Kids Walk Into A Bank will learn why love is the ultimate hostage situation in GOING TO THE CHAPEL, available in comic shops and on digital devices February 19, 2020!

GOING TO THE CHAPEL TPB

DC Reveals a Look at Swamp Thing: Twin Branches, a New Young Adult Graphic Novel Out October 2020

Swamp Thing: Twin Branches

Written by Maggie Stiefvater
Illustrated by Morgan Beem
Colored by Jeremy Lawson
Lettered by Ariana Maher
On Sale October 13, 2020
MSRP: $16.99

The #1 New York Times bestselling author Maggie Stiefvater (the Raven Cycle series) and artist Morgan Beem unearth the primal power of memory and how it twists the bond between two brothers.

Twins Alec and Walker Holland have a reputation around town. One is quiet and the other is the life of any party, but they are inseparable. For their last summer before college, the two leave the city to live with their rural cousins, where they find that the swamp holds far darker depths than they could have imagined. 

While Walker carves their names into the new social scene, Alec recedes into a summer school laboratory, because he brought something from home on their trip—it’s an experiment that will soon consume him. This season, both brothers must confront truths ancient and familial, and as their lives diverge, tensions increase and dormant memories claw to the surface.

Swamp Thing: Twin Branches is a story of shadows literal and imagined—and those that take form and haunt us. 

Swamp Thing: Twin Branches

Green Lantern: Legacy Gets a Trailer

Thirteen-year-old Tai Pham lives in the apartment above his grandmother’s store in a room crammed with sketchpads and comic books. Tai’s youthful imagination cannot prepare him for the world he is thrown into. He must overcome his greatest obstacle in order to keep his grandmother’s legacy alive: fear.

When Tai inherits his grandmother’s jade ring, he soon finds out it’s more than it appears. Suddenly, he is inducted into a group of space cops known as the Green Lanterns, and every time he puts pen to paper, he is forced to confront his insecurity that he might not be creative or strong enough to uphold his bá’s legacy. Tai must decide what kind of hero he wants to be: Will he learn to soar above his insecurities, or will the past keep him grounded?

Green Lantern: Legacy is written by Minh Lê, with art by Andie Tong, colored by Sarah Stern, and lettering by Ariana Maher.

You can watch our review.

Review: Green Lantern: Legacy

Tai Pham’s grandmother has a secret, she’s a Green Lantern. After she passes, her ring becomes his and he has a whole new responsibility. A fantastic new graphic novel for young readers.

Story: Minh Lê
Art: Andie Tong
Color: Sarah Stern
Letterer: Ariana Maher

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores on January 21! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Banks

The Banks

White Collar was one of those shows that USA Network had on for a few years which both charmed and beguiled viewers. It followed a unique relationship between an FBI agent and a former grifter as they investigate white-collar crimes. Its starred Matt Bomer, Tim DeKay, Tiffani Thiessen, and the immortal Diahann Carroll, in a show which explored both sides of the line of the law, often referring to Bomer’s character’s past and previous proclivities. It really elevated the buddy comedy genre in ways that many shows have tried to imitate since.

What was fascinating was how the show delved deep into the criminal underworld and gave viewers a deep dive into con artist tradecraft. As a writer I often wondered about the roads not taken in stories, and one of those within the show was the backstory of Carroll’s husband, who was also a con man. I felt it would have been better to show this story than to allude to it as the show did through its entire run. The idea of a family of thieves was something I wished W.E.B. Griffin would have tackled in his prolific career. Roxane Gay and Ming Doyle’s beautifully woven The Banks gives us a family whose business is about the next big score and they live by one code, don’t get caught and don’t get greedy.

We’re taken to 1972 Evanston, Illinois, where we meet Clara Banks, a shrewd robber whose skill set as a safecracker has made one of the best in all of Chicago. She develops a family business which is far from your typical. The story weaves through the past to the present delivering an interesting family of thieves and eventually leading to a score and revenge.

Overall, an excellent and intricately told story about a family whose business is more than ill-gotten gains, as love and legacy is paramount to everything. The story by Gay is immense, heartfelt, and harrowing. The art by the creative team is beautiful. Altogether, a story that does more than add sepia tones to the crime noir genre but elevates it a new standard of storytelling.

Story: Roxane Gay
Art: Ming Doyle, Jordie Bellaire, Ariana Maher, Jared K Fletcher,
and Jeff Powell
Story: 10 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.9 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Eve of Extinction

Eve of Extinction

The toxic culture of masculinity has lead to society swiftly blaming the victim. Media pundits and social media always focus on the “extenuating circumstances.” The sheer ignorance and closed-mindedness show how severe the degree of devaluation of women, and even more so female victims, that society at large has accepted. What makes it worse is that many of the detractors are also women. This blind devotion to the patriarchy is distressing. As was illustrated in 2016 in politics, it’s  chronically symptomatic of a societal attitude, as many women voters during the last presidential election questioned whether Hillary Clinton was fit to be President. Many voters cited an outdated reason, “She would let emotions rule her decisions” as a reason to not support her.

This philosophy only aggregates the belief that women should not speak up. Progress much like the arc of justice that Dr. King spoke about is slow but sure. Platforms such as social media have continued to spotlight these atrocities. Men like Matt Lauer and Harvey Weinstein are being exposed while the actions and behaviors like those of Louis CK and Kevin Spacey are now being pronounced as unacceptable. Genre fiction like Handmaid’s Tale shows the effects of ugly patriarchal beliefs. The Twilight Zone‘s recent “Not All Men” took a horror take on how evil this behavior is. In the Simeone Brothers’ Eve Of Extinction, they make a similar take, but this time the ugliness of toxic masculinity turns men into actual monsters.

The story leans into some horror tropes as women are pursued by monsters, in this case men who turn into them. It’s an extinction type event as every man has changed attacking those around them. It’s a fight for survival in this allegorical and timely tale. It’s familiar but has a nice layered spin to it.

Overall, an outstanding entry in the dystopian horror genre, one that is unique and compelling than any in recent memory. The story by the Simeone Brothers is pulse-pounding and well developed. The art by the creative team is awe-inspiring and kudos to them for drawing a realistic description of Vitiligo, a common condition that is rarely depicted in comics. Altogether, a timely and exciting story that gives readers protagonists they would fight alongside any day.

Story: Salvatore A. Simeone and Steve Simeone
Art: Isaac Goodheart, Nik Virella, Ruth Redmond, Maria Nguyen,
and Ariana Maher
Story: 9.7 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Review: James Bond #1

James Bond #1

With a new film on the horizon, the excitement for more James Bond is in the air and Dynamite Entertainment delivers a new direction and series kicking off with James Bond #1.

Written by Vita Ayala and Danny Lore the comic is an entertaining heist story but feels a little short when it comes to 007.

The first issue revolves around a missing painting which has been stolen with a forgery put in its place. Much of the issue is the discussion around and investigation involving that. Bond’s role is limited to an action sequence opening and a much later appearance. Instead, the issue is mainly focused on the two investigators attempting to figure out who stole the painting.

The comic is a good setup, don’t get me wrong. We get taken through the investigation and logic to figure out who the most likely thieves are. But, with a lack of Bond and lack of action, the comic feels more like The Italian Job from the police perspective than Bond. Still, the comic is good for those that enjoy that sort of story. By the end, we get at least more of a glimpse of our hero and the main attraction. Unlike recent Bond comics, this one doesn’t throw you into the action instead it gives us a slow build of the mystery.

The art by Eric Gapstur is good. Colored by Roshan Kurichiyanil and Rebecca Nalty with lettering by Ariana Maher, the comic’s art keeps the story entertaining despite the lack of action. It’s difficult to make what’s presented visually engaging but the team does a solid job. It doesn’t have the big explosions are crazy sequences but there’s something expressive about the characters that hooks you.

As a heist story, James Bond #1 is a solid start. As a Bond story, it’s a bit mixed. The issue is a lot of buildup to whatever villain awaits. It’s just a bit different in how we get there. The threat too feels a bit scaled back for a character who in the past has stopped global threats, another interesting change. There’s more to come and the debut is interesting enough to check the rest out. It just might be a disappointment for those expecting the typical Bond over the top action and threats.

Story: Vita Ayala, Danny Lore Art: Eric Gapstur
Color: Roshan Kurichiyanil, Rebecca Nalty Letterer: Ariana Maher
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Dynamite Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

DC Reveals a Look at Lois Lane and the Friendship Challenge

Lois Lane and the Friendship Challenge

Written by Grace Ellis
Illustrated by Brittney L. Williams
Colored by Caitlin Quirk 
Lettered by Ariana Maher
On sale 7/21/2020
MSRP: $9.99

From New York Times bestselling author Grace Ellis (Lumberjanes) and artist Brittney Williams (Goldie Vance) comes a new story about 13-year-old Lois Lane as she navigates the confusing worlds of social media and friendship.

It’s the first day of summer break in the sleepy town of Liberty View, and young Lois Lane bursts onto the scene with what she knows is a sure-to-go-viral video channel. Okay, maybe her platform only receives two views a week (thanks, Mom), and maybe her best friend, Kristen, isn’t quite as enthusiastic about social media, but when Lois sets her mind on something, there’s no turning back.

At the end of the week, the big neighborhood barbecue and bike race will be the perfect backdrop to Lois and Kristen’s #friendshipchallenge video. But when the girls find out the annual fireworks are missing, Lois doubles down on her efforts for fame, testing her friendship in ways she couldn’t imagine. 

With Kristen leaving for sleepaway camp after the barbeque and a new girl on the block taking all of Kristen’s attention, will Lois be able to find the missing fireworks, celebrate the summer, and post the best #friendshipchallenge the internet has ever seen? Or will she have to face her challenges IRL?

Lois Lane and the Friendship Challenge

Are You Going to the Chapel this Valentine’s Day?

The wedding gone wrong gets collected on Valentine’s Day as Going to the Chapel is brought together in one handy collection.

Emily Anderson is a wealthy bride-to-be grappling with a serious case of cold feet — but before she can say anything, her wedding is hijacked by the bank-robbing Bad Elvis Gang. But when this smash-and-grab spirals into a full-blown standoff with the police, Emily will become the unlikely ringleader of her own hostage situation in order to decide where her happily ever after truly lies.

Written by David Pepose with art by Gavin Guidry, color by Liz Kramer, and lettering by Ariana Maher, the trade is due in stores February 12, 2020.

Going to the Chapel
« Older Entries