Tag Archives: a wave blue world

Explore Today’s New Digital Comics from Marvel, Image, BOOM!, IDW, and More!

S.W.O.R.D. #2

Today’s new comic book day and comiXology has you covered. There’s over 125 new comics waiting for you in their digital storefront. Get shopping now or check out the new releases below!

AAM-Markosia

A Wave Blue World

Ablaze

Abstract Studio

AfterShock

American Mythology Productions

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Humanoids

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Red 5 Comics

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant Entertainment

Vault Comics

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

A Wave Blue World Provides Retailers with 2 Free Exclusive Variants as a Thank You

A Wave Blue World is kicking off 2021 by showing thanks to retailers who have supported them by ordering their books, backing their Kickstarters, or signed up for their monthly newsletters.

AWBW will be sending supporting retailers 2 limited edition copies of The 27 Run: Crush #1 Premier Edition featuring an exclusive cover by artist Leo Colapietro. The exclusive is limited to a print run of 300.

Crush is the follow-up to 2018’s original mechs vs. monsters graphic novel The 27 Run. The sequel introduces a new hero, Beti, and her telepathic dog, E.K., as they face off against 27 towering monsters in a post-apocalyptic Earth. Created and written by Justin Zimmerman, the series features art by Ethan Claunch and Russell Brown, colors by Fran Gamboa, and lettering by Thomas Mauer.

The 27 Run: Crush #1

The regular edition of The 27 Run: Crush #1 Premier Edition hits retail shops on January 13, 2021 with a cover by Ken Lashley and Juan Fernandez. A hardcover collected edition will be released on March 10 featuring cover artist Robbi Rodriguez.

Other Premier Editions due out this year from A Wave Blue World include Averee by Stephanie Phillips and Marika Cresta with an exclusive cover by Dave Johnson (February 2021), and The Orphan King by Tyler Chin-Tanner and James Boyle with an exclusive cover by InHyuk Lee (April 2021).

Check Out Today’s New Digital Comic Releases from Marvel, BOOM!, Image, and more!

Taskmaster #1

Check out today’s new digital comics releases on comiXology. It features new releases from Marvel, BOOM!, Image, IDW, and so much more. You can check out all of the releases and get shopping now or the individual issues by the publisher below.

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

American Mythology Productions

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

DC Thomson

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Hermes Press

Humanoids

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Keenspot

Kodansha

Lion Forge Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Queer Comix

Red 5 Comics

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Valiant

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

ComiXology Has 5 New Releases from A Wave Blue World, Yen Press, Harlequin, and Magnetic Press

ComiXology has five new digital comics for you to start your week with. There are new releases from A Wave Blue World, Yen Press, Harlequin, and Magnetic Press. You can check out all of the comics here or the individual issues below.

Death of the Horror Anthology

Written by Vita Ayala, Kelly Brack, Steph Cannon, Melissa Hudson, Brian Level, Ryan K. Lindsay, Jed McPherson, Lonnie Nadler, Eric Palicki, Emily Pearson, Pat Shand, Cody Sousa, John Ward
Art by Rio Burton, Daniel Dwyer, Val Halvorson, Matthew Hann, Melissa Hudson, Francesco Iaguinta, Brian Level, Leonie O’Moore, Emily Pearson, Raymond Salvador, J Paul Schiek, Chris Shehan, Ariel Viola
Pencils Danny Lore
Colored by Dee Cunniffe, Cassie Hart
Cover by Adam Gorham, Cassie Hart
Purchase

Right in time for Halloween, A Wave Blue World brings you a new collection or terrifying stories from some of the most talented and twisted minds in comics! Curated by Kelly Brack and edited by Danny Lore, these 13 tales of horror explore the theme of inner demons and feature everything from alien encounters to blood-thirsty monsters. After reading DEATH OF THE HORROR, you’ll never be the same again!

Death of the Horror Anthology

Goblin Slayer #53

Written by Kumo Kagyu
Art by Noboru Kannatuki, Kousuke Kurose
Purchase

This series is rated Adults Only DISCLAIMER: graphic sexuality gore
The goblin paladin and his forces close in on the party—it’s time to play every last trump card and finish them for good! Read the next chapter of Goblin Slayer the same day as Japan!

Goblin Slayer #53

Hinowa ga CRUSH! #35

Written by Takahiro
Art by Strelka
Purchase

This series is rated Adults Only DISCLAIMER: graphic sexuality
The remanents of Soukai gather up their fallen and attempt a retreat! Read the next chapter of Hinowa ga CRUSH! at the same time as Japan!

Hinowa ga CRUSH! #35

Marriage For Sale

Written by Carol Devine
Art by Sachiko Shirai
Purchase

At the local auction, cowboy Linc is shocked to see a beautiful woman put up for sale. Rachel’s been put on the auction block by The Community, a group who lives isolated from modern society. Wanting to grant her freedom, Linc places the winning bid, not realizing that it means he must marry her. Linc decides he’ll divorce her in order to give her independence. But naive Rachel’s purity soon wins the cowboy over.

Marriage For Sale

Pistouvi #3

Written by Merwan
Art by Bertrand Gatignol
Purchase

Winter is here, and life in the treehouse is starting to get less whimsical by the day…

Pistouvi #3

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera

When I saw that I had the opportunity to review The Phantom of the Opera graphic novel, my first thought was, is it going to play music when I open it, like one of those novelty greeting cards? Then I read a little further into the email from A Wave Blue World and knew that I needed to review this title. You see, Hungarian artist Varga Tomi doesn’t take the same approach as Andrew Lloyd Webber or Joel Schumacher. Instead, Tomi gives readers a direct adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel, the inspiration for every other version of The Phantom of the Opera most of us have likely seen before.

Every artistic detail in this graphic novel is gorgeous. From the intricate page layouts to the color choices, to the sophisticated lettering, every page of this book is a work of art. Before starting in on this adaptation, Tomi traveled to Paris to study the city’s architecture. The sketches he made during his travels are directly transposed onto the page. Many panels are framed by the opera house’s architectural design and the building itself looks real. This turns the opera house into a player in the story and not just a background setting.

Tomi’s color choices further elevate his illustrations of the opera house. Tomi uses soft, warm colors for flashbacks. These colors reflect Raoul’s fond memories of his childhood with Christine. The scenes set beneath the opera house really look like they’re set in a cave. Tomi colors these scenes while taking into consideration where the light source is located in each panel. The shadows created by this effect add intensity to scenes that are already spooky.

My only complaint about the art is that I found it difficult to tell certain characters a part. This was especially true for minor characters that appear briefly in a scene and then aren’t seen again until later. Despite this complaint, I do need to mention that the Phantom is very creepy. In other adaptations, the Phantom looks more or less like a normal guy until his mask is removed. Tomi’s Phantom looks like there is something off about him, even when he’s wearing the mask. Tomi draws him with a sinister air, even in the scenes that are set in innocuous locales, such as the parlor of the opera house.

For those who have only seen the musical, the story from the original novel plays out a little differently. Leroux’s novel is a classic example of gothic fiction. These days most people hear “gothic” and think of stories set in a creepy old mansion. With the opera house as a grand backdrop, Tomi chooses to focus on the other elements of gothic fiction, namely hints of the supernatural, an air of forbidden romance, and characters cursed with dark fates. Even though there are differences between the musical’s story and the novel’s, the big moments are still present in the graphic novel, such as the chandelier crash, the masquerade ball, and the underground river. Not to sound like a broken record, but thanks to Tomi’s artistic talents, these big moments look amazing.

This graphic novel adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera is perfect for fans of gothic fiction. It’s the sort of book that a person could buy solely to look at the art. Admittedly, the story within may not appeal to everyone, as it’s different from the version with which they’re most familiar. Tomi also presents a faithful adaptation of Leroux’s novel and doesn’t update any of the language for a modern audience. This doesn’t make for the easiest read for those who aren’t used to reading works from the last century. For those who like the story of The Phantom of the Opera, but don’t care for musicals, this graphic novel is a perfect compromise. If after reading this review, you’re unsure as to whether you want to buy this graphic novel, check out our preview. Don’t be surprised if the beautiful art wins you over immediately.

Story: Gaston Leroux Script: Varga Tomi Art: Varga Tomi Letters by Varga Tomi
Story/Adaptation: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.5 Reccomendation: Read

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle Bookshop

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Batman #101

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman #101 (DC Comics) – The first two arcs of James Tynion IV’s run are over and now we’re getting to the meat of his vision and direction for the character. This is the fresh starting point for new readers as Batman lays out his vision of where things should go and faces new challenges in how to do it.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Presents: Madam Satan #1 (Archie Comics/Archie Horror) – Archie gets into the Halloween season with this one-shot comic where the Queen of Hell wants to prove herself to be the most powerful being in the Underworld!

Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1 (DC Comics) – The issue is a lot of fun showing us more about Robin King and continuing the streak that the Death Metal one-shots are more entertaining than the event itself.

Dead Day #4 (AfterShock) – The series has been amazing so far not just telling a story but really creating a whole world for readers to think about and explore the impact of the concept. This issue continues the series’ excellent run really bringing the action and plot points together. And there’s a reveal we were not expecting.

Dune: House Atreides #1 (BOOM! Studios) – With the movie delayed, fans of Dune will just have this prequel comic series to enjoy for a while. We have an early review that loved the story and chess game of the characters.

Edgar Allan Poe’s Snifter of Blood #1 (AHOY Comics) – It’s more snarky tales of terror with a whole new title from the folks at AHOY! Add some laughs to your Halloween horrors!

Electric Black Presents #1 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Two chilling tales of cosmic horror, madness, and wartime revenge as Scout launches their Black Caravan imprint!

Fantastic Four #25 (Marvel) – This is setting the Fantastic Four up for their next adventure! If you’re looking for a spot to start reading Marvel’s First Family, this is it.

History Comics: Challenger Disaster (First Second) – The first releases for the “History Comics” line-up were fantastic. They’re both entertaining and educational, perfect for young kids who want to learn and adults who want to brush up on history.

Juggernaut #2 (Marvel) – We didn’t know we needed this series. The first issue was fantastic and the second is just as solid. This is not what we thought it’d be and a story of redemption and reflection like this is just a gripping and touching read.

King Tank Girl #1 (Albatross Funnybooks) – Tank Girl moves to Albatross and we’re expecting the usual fun insanity the character and series bring.

Phantom Starkiller #1 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Sci-fi trippy action that has a Kirby vibe about it. We really want to check this out after only really seeing the cover for the series. A very 70s vibe about it, we really want to find out more about one of the launch titles from Scout’s Black Caravan imprint.

Phantom of the Opera (A Wave Blue World) – An adaptation of the classic story. The visuals are amazing. Check out our review and make sure to pick it up!

The Scumbag #1 (Image Comics) – A new series from Rick Remender is always something to check out. With a rotating line of amazing artists, this is a series to check out and is intriguing. We have an early review to check out and decide if it’s for you!

Stillwater by Zdarsky & Perez #2 (Image Comics) – A mystery with horror tinge, the first issue was a solid slow build with one hell of an ending. We’re excited to see where this series goes. The idea is familiar but we’re expecting it to take us in a new and exciting direction.

Werewolf By Night #1 (Marvel) – While the first issue doesn’t hook us as much as we’d hope, there’s a lot here to like and it’s something new and different. It’s sort of tied to the “Outlawed” event impacting Marvel’s younger heroes and has a nice throwback aspect to it in many ways. There’s a lot of potential in this series.

Review: The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera

When I saw that I had the opportunity to review The Phantom of the Opera graphic novel, my first thought was, is it going to play music when I open it, like one of those novelty greeting cards? Then I read a little further into the email from A Wave Blue World and knew that I needed to review this title. You see, Hungarian artist Varga Tomi doesn’t take the same approach as Andrew Lloyd Webber or Joel Schumacher. Instead, Tomi gives readers a direct adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel, the inspiration for every other version of The Phantom of the Opera most of us have likely seen before.

Every artistic detail in this graphic novel is gorgeous. From the intricate page layouts to the color choices, to the sophisticated lettering, every page of this book is a work of art. Before starting in on this adaptation, Tomi traveled to Paris to study the city’s architecture. The sketches he made during his travels are directly transposed onto the page. Many panels are framed by the opera house’s architectural design and the building itself looks real. This turns the opera house into a player in the story and not just a background setting.

Tomi’s color choices further elevate his illustrations of the opera house. Tomi uses soft, warm colors for flashbacks. These colors reflect Raoul’s fond memories of his childhood with Christine. The scenes set beneath the opera house really look like they’re set in a cave. Tomi colors these scenes while taking into consideration where the light source is located in each panel. The shadows created by this effect add intensity to scenes that are already spooky.

My only complaint about the art is that I found it difficult to tell certain characters a part. This was especially true for minor characters that appear briefly in a scene and then aren’t seen again until later. Despite this complaint, I do need to mention that the Phantom is very creepy. In other adaptations, the Phantom looks more or less like a normal guy until his mask is removed. Tomi’s Phantom looks like there is something off about him, even when he’s wearing the mask. Tomi draws him with a sinister air, even in the scenes that are set in innocuous locales, such as the parlor of the opera house.

For those who have only seen the musical, the story from the original novel plays out a little differently. Leroux’s novel is a classic example of gothic fiction. These days most people hear “gothic” and think of stories set in a creepy old mansion. With the opera house as a grand backdrop, Tomi chooses to focus on the other elements of gothic fiction, namely hints of the supernatural, an air of forbidden romance, and characters cursed with dark fates. Even though there are differences between the musical’s story and the novel’s, the big moments are still present in the graphic novel, such as the chandelier crash, the masquerade ball, and the underground river. Not to sound like a broken record, but thanks to Tomi’s artistic talents, these big moments look amazing.

This graphic novel adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera is perfect for fans of gothic fiction. It’s the sort of book that a person could buy solely to look at the art. Admittedly, the story within may not appeal to everyone, as it’s different from the version with which they’re most familiar. Tomi also presents a faithful adaptation of Leroux’s novel and doesn’t update any of the language for a modern audience. This doesn’t make for the easiest read for those who aren’t used to reading works from the last century. For those who like the story of The Phantom of the Opera, but don’t care for musicals, this graphic novel is a perfect compromise. If after reading this review, you’re unsure as to whether you want to buy this graphic novel, check out our preview. Don’t be surprised if the beautiful art wins you over immediately. This graphic novel is available now digitally and hits comic book stores on October 21st.

Story: Gaston Leroux Script: Varga Tomi Art: Varga Tomi Letters by Varga Tomi
Story/Adaptation: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.5 Reccomendation: Read

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle Bookshop

Preview: The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera

WRITER: Varga Tomi
ILLUSTRATOR: Varga Tomi
AGE RANGE: General Adult
GENRE: Classic Lit / Horror 
SRP: $16.99
PAGE COUNT: 128
PUB DATE: October 20, 2020
PUBLISHER: A Wave Blue World

Everyone has heard the whispered tales of the phantom who lives beneath the opera house, the mysterious trickster behind all the little mishaps and lost things. But no one has ever seen the monster . . . until now. When the promise of blossoming love lures him out from his intricately constructed hideaways in the labyrinthine building’s walls and cellars, a hideously disfigured artist trains the lovely Christine to be the opera’s next star for a steep price. Does she choose her newfound success or her beloved Count Raoul? This doomed love triangle threatens to combust when a tragic death, a series of betrayals, and increasingly dangerous accidents cast the players of The Palais Garnier into a heart-wrenching horror story that will echo through the ages.

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, the iconic gothic romance, is retold with all the spectacle its legend demands in this devoted graphic novel adaptation that marries stunning artwork with Gaston Leroux’s haunting prose.

The Phantom of the Opera

ComiXology Delivers Over 150 New Digital Comics For Your New Comic Book Day

Champions #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day! ComiXology has your digital comic needs with over 150 new digital comics available for you right now. You can start shopping or check out the individual issues below that are available today.

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Hermes Press

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Legendary Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Papercutz

Red 5 Comics

SAF Comics

Titan Comics

Valiant

Vault

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle

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