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Music and Horror Join Forces in Dead Beats from A Wave Blue World

Indie comic publisher A Wave Blue World has launched a Kickstarter campaign for Dead Beats, a horror anthology inspired by SyFy’s Haunted Collector and CBS’s Twilight Zone, incorporating music themes to bring an additional edge.  

Dead Beats, curated by Eric Palicki and Joe Corallo, will be feature a diverse group of industry-shaping storytellers and artists, including recently announced Dwayne McDuffie Award winners Ivy Noelle Weir and Christina “Steenz” Stewart, GLAAD Nominated Magdalene Visaggio, Emmy-nominated writer of Late Show With Stephen Colbert’s Daniel KibblesmithDoom Patrol’s Rachel Pollack and Richard Case, Suicide Squad’s Vita Ayala, Women in Comics Collective International co-founder Regene Sawyer, and more.

This music-themed horror anthology centers around the proprietor of a music store that contains a number of unusual artifacts. As the “shoppe keeper” guides readers through the shop, each creator will weave a haunting tale revealing the origin of these mysterious items.

A Wave Blue World is asking readers to be involved and to support Dead Beats Kickstarter Campaign by preordering Dead Beats, selecting Exclusive awards offered including original art by artists like Jen Hickman and an one-on-one portfolio review with Joe Illidge, A Wave Blue World’s Editorial Director, formerly editor at DC Comics, Lionforge, and Valiant, or simply just pledging to be included in the backers page.

Dead Beats

Joe Illidge and Lisa Y. Wu Join the A Wave Blue World Team

A Wave Blue World, an independent publisher is expanding its staff to continue connecting people through storytelling and provide a platform for a multitude of creative voices. In their mission to use comics and graphic novels as a medium for change, they have appointed Lisa Y. Wu as Vice President of Sales and Marketing and Joe Illidge as Editorial Director.

Experienced in community outreach for diverse organizations and leveraging innovative dynamic marketing strategies to maximize brand awareness, Lisa previously utilized her skills to impact audience and sales growth as Director of Retailer Relations at AfterShock Comics. Among other roles, Lisa also worked as Social Media/Promotions for Saga Communications and Marketing Coordinator for Dave & Busters. Lisa holds a B.A. in English and M.A. in Teaching from The Citadel and is an M.B.A. candidate at Fordham University’s Gabelli School of Business.

As Editorial Director for A Wave Blue World, Joe will work with creators from the comic book and global entertainment industries to develop groundbreaking books celebrating inclusion and heroism.

In his career, Joe served as an editor on the Batman for DC Entertainment, Senior Editor for Lion Forge Comics, and Executive Editor for Valiant Entertainment. Joe’s first job in the industry was at Milestone Media, Inc., a publisher of inclusive superhero stories, best known for the award-winning animated series “Static Shock” from Warner Bros.

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

A Wave Blue World offers Free Comics to Supporters of Mark Waid’s Legal Fund

A Wave Blue World (AWBW), publisher of anthologies such as Broken Frontier, All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World, and the upcoming Death of the Horror Anthology, announces they will send free digital copies of This Nightmare Kills Fascists and a special color version of the All We Ever Wanted ashcan edition to anyone who donates $15USD or more to Mark Waid‘s legal fundraiser.

The longstanding comic book pro is currently being sued by one of the perceived leaders of the online harassment movement called ‘ComicsGate’. To fund his defense against the suit, Waid has launched a crowdfunding appeal on Go Fund Me.

Curated and edited by Matt Miner (GWAR, Poser) and Eric Palicki (No Angel, Atlantis Wasn’t Built For Tourists), This Nightmare Kills Fascists is a horror anthology in the style of Creepy and Eerie, told against the backdrop of modern politics.  It boasts stories from a plethora of hot creators including Vita Ayala, Tini Howard, Justin Jordan, Ariela Kristantina, Ryan Ferrier, and many, many more.

All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World is an upcoming anthology spearheaded by the same editorial team plus AWBW publisher Tyler Chin-Tanner that looks into a more hopeful and positive future, and has been described as “less Mad Max, more Star Trek.”  Currently available to order in the October issue of Previews, the anthology is set to hit stores in December.

The print version of the ashcan was an exclusive for NYCC ‘18, but can now be obtained digitally only by those who support this fund. It contains three of the stories from the anthology by creators Robbi Rodriguez, Tyler Chin-Tanner, Paul Allor, Juan Romera, Eric Palicki, and Eryk Donovan.

AWBW publisher Tyler Chin-Tanner said in the release:

Over his entire career, Mark Waid has always been a champion for creators’ rights and now he’s standing up for them against bullying and harassment. It’s important for us to come together now as a comics community to support him.

Comic creator Matt Miner added:

If our fascist-smashing anthology can help Mark Waid fight against actual fascists in comics then I’m all for it. I stand with my LGBT family and trans friends in denouncing comicsgate and all the hate that they spew.

Comic creator Eric Palicki also said:

I don’t know Mark personally, but I’ve followed his work for as long as I’ve been reading comics. It’s no surprise a writer who understands Superman or Daredevil so profoundly would devote so much of himself to standing up to real-life bullies, and I’m proud to help Mark in any way I can.

To obtain the PDFs for This Nightmare Kills Fascists and the All We Ever Wanted ashcan, please send a screenshot of your receipt of your donation of $15USD or more to Mark Waid’s fundraiser to tyler@awbw.com.

Exclusive: Read Chris Peterson’s “Una” from All We Ever Wanted, Out this December

Out December 12 from A Wave Blue World, the comic anthology All We Ever Wanted includes an impressive collection of creative talent. The anthology is filled with stories that present a brighter vision of the future. No doom-and-gloom here! These sci-fi tales are meant to inspire hope and restore the belief that a better world is possible.

Check out the full list of what you’ll find:

Dean Trippe – “The Pilot” Vasillis Pozios & Ryan Cody – “Good Time”
Jennie Wood & Jeff McComsey – “Alternica” Justin Zimmerman & Ethan Claunch – “Life is a Devil’s Bargain”
Paul Allor & Juan Romera – “And the Rest is Music” Maria Frohlich – “It Looked Like Our Dreams”
Chris Visions – “Blackstar” Matt Miner & Matt Horak – “Just Like Heaven”
Howard Mackie & Ryan Lee – “Bombs Away” James Maddox & Gavin Smith – “Owning Up to the Past”
Taylor Hoffman & K.R. Whalen – “Can You See It Now” Lucia Fasano & Tess Fowler – “The Inventor’s Daughter”
Nadia Shammas & Jude Vagrants – “Chat Room” Jarrett Melendez & Danica Brine – “The Weight of Time”
Kay Honda & Liana Kangas – “Choice” Tyler Chin-Tanner & Robbi Rodriguez – “Seventeen Souls”
Eliot Rahal & Jason Copland – “Day at the Park” Chris Peterson – “Una”
Lela Gwenn & Tony Gregori – “Everything I Own” Erik Burnham & Anthony Marques – “Seeds”
Josh Gorfain & Matt LeJeune – “First Steps Outside” Eric Palicki & Eryk Donovan – “Two Left Feet”
Richard Douek & David Stoll – “Gaea” Wendy Chin-Tanner & Toby Cypress – “Velleity”

The cover is by Ariela Kristantina with colors by Michael Wiggam.

You can pre-order it now from your comic shop with Diamond Order Code: OCT181514.

A Wave Blue World has hooked us up with an exclusive look at Chris Peterson‘s “Una,” which you can read below.

Review: Broken Frontier Anthology

The overused term, “rules are made to be broken,” has been said repeatedly when it is thought that someone has gone against convention. As the world slowly embraces the diversity that surrounds it, so has popular media. Comics have always challenged type but has mostly been monochromatic. It has only recently been proactive about being diverse in not only race and sexuality, but also ability. Wave Blue World‘s Broken Frontier offers up stories where they do just that, break the rules.

In “Phantom Limb Ghost Puncher,” a police officer who loses his arm during a rescue, magically receives a mystical weapon which changes his life instantly. In “Stranger Than Fiction,” a clairvoyant helps out a murder suspect, by revisiting the day of the crime through his unconscious mind. In “Dark Dark World,” young imaginative writer plays out a scene for a story, all in her father’s work shed. In “The Wall,” set in a dystopian future, societies’ fortunes are separated only by allegiance.

In “Flyer,”  a elderly man, gives a prep talk to his adolescent granddaughter, as she prepares to engage in a dogfight by way of rocketpack. “In The Night, Mountains Grew,” a ranger’s gross miscalculation proves fatal for those she protects. In “The Beard,” a young woman uncontrollably grows a facial hair at a unusually rapid rate, something befuddles her day after day, until she realizes her greater destiny, one that would change her life forever. In “Purgatory,” a woman falls into a coma, and gets transported to a different world, where she gets to be her true self.

In “The Trip,” a rather routine start of a morning for a man and his daughter, becomes a lesson in realizing every day is precious. In “Its About Time,” a scientist uses his considerable powers to time travel before his wife died, but what he finds out changes his whole outlook on her. In “Inside Outside,” a woman coming off her meds is constantly irritated by “cute squishy monsters.” In “Last dance at Omega Point,” as a rocket heads to its firing point, a woman’s life unpacks in alternate reality.

Overall, an excellent comic anthology which explores what can be or what will be. The stories by all the writers pluck the emotions of the reader in the best way possible. The art by the creators are all beautiful. Altogether, a plus sized comic treat which entertains on every page and you will wish was longer.

Story: Greg Pak, Tyler Chin-Tanner,Cullen Bunn, Phil Hester, Robert Dammelin, Justin Zimmerman, A. David Lewis, Fred Van Lente, Carla Berrocal, Jamie Coe, Edie OP, Joshua Hale Fialkov, Merguerite Bennett,Frederik Hautain, Kurt Belcher,  Adam Egypt Mortimer, Karrie Fransman, David Hine, Noah Van Sciver, Sean Wang, Salgood Sam, Box Brown,  PJ Holden, Scott Ferguson, INJ Culbard, Steve Orlando, Steve Bryant
Art: Steve Bryant, INJ Culbard, Yaroslav Astapeev, PJ Holden, Salgood Sam, Sean Wang, Box Brown, Noah Van Sciver, Mark Stafford, Karrie Fransman, Jeff McComsey, Facundo Percio, Rob Croonenborghs, Varga Tomi, Ryan Kelly, Edie OP, Toby Cypress, Jamie Coe, Robert Sammelin, Carla Berrocal, Daniel Warren Johnson, Nathan Fox, Alison Sampson, Noel Tuazon, Aysegul Sinav, Mike Lawrence, Tom Raney, Simon Bowland, Taylor Esposito, Gina Going, Jason Wordie
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Kismet, the First Muslim Superhero, Returns

Having debuted in 1944’s Bomber Comics #1, “Kismet, Man of Fate” never had his own fate revealed despite being comic books’ first Muslim superhero. Over seventy years passed between his last adventure fighting Nazis behind the front lines in war-time Germany and just last year when he returned as part of The Broken Frontier Anthology, a successful Kickstarter campaign from publisher A Wave Blue World (AWBW). Now, the same Eisner Award-nominated team that brought back the character is continuing his modern-day adventures in the weekly Kismet, Man of Fate online feature as part of the AWBW’s Under Current imprint.

Writer A. David Lewis and artist Noel Tuazon are joined by colorist Rob Croonenborghs and Ghost Glyph Studios in bringing Kismet to the current day. Beginning May 2nd and running two pages per week for the next year, the storyline will pit Kismet against the climate of the 2016 U.S. Presidential campaign and its ensuing fallout in Boston and beyond. Additionally, the issues of LGBTQ rights, experimental science, and immigrant communities will feature prominently in the year-long storyline.

Lewis, who separately serves as the President of Comics for Youth Refugees Incorporated Collective (CYRIC), has no intention to fall into superhero conventions nor shy away from challenging, real-world conflicts. In the release, Lewis said:

Kismet was created at a moment where fascism was a real and present danger. With the political climate being what it is right now – with Islamophobia, homophobia, anti-Semitism, and hate crimes all on the rise – there seems no better time to reengage the character.

Kismet, Man of Fate is available weekly with the initial pages already available for free viewing. The completed storyline will be available in print in 2018.

Preview: Ghastly Tales

Ghastly Tales

Writer: Marguerite Bennett
Artist: Varga Tomi
Publisher: A Wave Blue World
Release: 9/7/2016
Retail: $4.99

An Alaskan ranger, a maiden scorned, a family of bootleggers; all cling desperately to the things in life they hold most dear… and woe is the fate of those who mean it harm.

After their story “In the Night, Mountains Grew” (part of the Broken Frontier Anthology released earlier this year) received so much praise, Marguerite Bennett (Bombshells, Insexts) and artist Varga Tomi didn’t want their collaboration to end there. That’s why they teamed-up for 2 new stories, “Koi” and “Cider” to put alongside the re-presenting of “In the Night, Mountains Grew” in a brand new one-shot collection containing a trio of terrifyingly twisted tales.

While Ghastly Tales will have a worldwide digital release through ComiXology, the print run is limited to only 400 copies and was not solicited through the direct market. Instead, publisher A Wave Blue World worked with retailers who’ve supported their books in the past to make the one-shot available in select locations across the U.S.

Current retailers stocking Ghastly Tales include: Books With Pictures, Bridge City Comics, Cosmic Monkey, Excalibur Comics, Floating World and Future Dreams (all in Portland, OR), Mission: Comics & Art (San Francisco, CA), Twilite Comics (Baltimore, MD), East Side Mags (Montclaire, NJ), and Escape Pod Comics (Huntington, NY)

Copies of Ghastly Tales are also available through the publisher’s website, where signed copies by both Marguerite Bennett & Varga Tomi can be purchased as well. These come with a certificate of authenticity and are numbered to only 30 copies!

Ghastly Tales

ComiXology Announces More DRM Free Publishers

comixology drm free wave twoToday comiXology unveiled the latest group of publishers offering DRM-free backups, allowing comiXology customers to download and store copies of their books. ComiXology’s new DRM-free backup feature was announced this past July during San Diego Comic-Con.

The second wave of participating publishers include IDW Publishing, Valiant Entertainment, Oni Press, Fantagraphics Books, Aspen Comics, Action Lab Entertainment, Th3rd World Studios, A Wave Blue World, Blind Ferret Entertainment, Caliber Comics, Creative Impulse Entertainment, Devil’s Due Entertainment, GT Labs Comics and Kingstone Media. They join Image Comics, Dynamite Entertainment, Zenescope Entertainment, MonkeyBrain Comics, Thrillbent, and Top Shelf Productions in offering this new option to customer. Creators using comiXology Submit also have the option to offer their comics, graphic novels, and manga as DRM-free backups. Some of the new publishers have previously announced going DRM free, or provide the option on other platforms.

To obtain the DRM-free backups of digital comics on comiXology, customers can go to the “My Books” section of comixology.com on their desktop computers and click the button that appears next to their books. Books and series from the second wave of participating publishers will be available for backup starting today. Backups from participating publishers can be downloaded in high definition PDF and CBZ.

Customers will continue to enjoy all their purchases – whether available as a DRM-free backup or not – on the comiXology platform in comiXology’s exclusive cinematic Guided View reading experience, anytime and anywhere.

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