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Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Batman #101

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman #101 (DC Comics) – The first two arcs of James Tynion IV’s run are over and now we’re getting to the meat of his vision and direction for the character. This is the fresh starting point for new readers as Batman lays out his vision of where things should go and faces new challenges in how to do it.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Presents: Madam Satan #1 (Archie Comics/Archie Horror) – Archie gets into the Halloween season with this one-shot comic where the Queen of Hell wants to prove herself to be the most powerful being in the Underworld!

Dark Nights: Death Metal Robin King #1 (DC Comics) – The issue is a lot of fun showing us more about Robin King and continuing the streak that the Death Metal one-shots are more entertaining than the event itself.

Dead Day #4 (AfterShock) – The series has been amazing so far not just telling a story but really creating a whole world for readers to think about and explore the impact of the concept. This issue continues the series’ excellent run really bringing the action and plot points together. And there’s a reveal we were not expecting.

Dune: House Atreides #1 (BOOM! Studios) – With the movie delayed, fans of Dune will just have this prequel comic series to enjoy for a while. We have an early review that loved the story and chess game of the characters.

Edgar Allan Poe’s Snifter of Blood #1 (AHOY Comics) – It’s more snarky tales of terror with a whole new title from the folks at AHOY! Add some laughs to your Halloween horrors!

Electric Black Presents #1 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Two chilling tales of cosmic horror, madness, and wartime revenge as Scout launches their Black Caravan imprint!

Fantastic Four #25 (Marvel) – This is setting the Fantastic Four up for their next adventure! If you’re looking for a spot to start reading Marvel’s First Family, this is it.

History Comics: Challenger Disaster (First Second) – The first releases for the “History Comics” line-up were fantastic. They’re both entertaining and educational, perfect for young kids who want to learn and adults who want to brush up on history.

Juggernaut #2 (Marvel) – We didn’t know we needed this series. The first issue was fantastic and the second is just as solid. This is not what we thought it’d be and a story of redemption and reflection like this is just a gripping and touching read.

King Tank Girl #1 (Albatross Funnybooks) – Tank Girl moves to Albatross and we’re expecting the usual fun insanity the character and series bring.

Phantom Starkiller #1 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Sci-fi trippy action that has a Kirby vibe about it. We really want to check this out after only really seeing the cover for the series. A very 70s vibe about it, we really want to find out more about one of the launch titles from Scout’s Black Caravan imprint.

Phantom of the Opera (A Wave Blue World) – An adaptation of the classic story. The visuals are amazing. Check out our review and make sure to pick it up!

The Scumbag #1 (Image Comics) – A new series from Rick Remender is always something to check out. With a rotating line of amazing artists, this is a series to check out and is intriguing. We have an early review to check out and decide if it’s for you!

Stillwater by Zdarsky & Perez #2 (Image Comics) – A mystery with horror tinge, the first issue was a solid slow build with one hell of an ending. We’re excited to see where this series goes. The idea is familiar but we’re expecting it to take us in a new and exciting direction.

Werewolf By Night #1 (Marvel) – While the first issue doesn’t hook us as much as we’d hope, there’s a lot here to like and it’s something new and different. It’s sort of tied to the “Outlawed” event impacting Marvel’s younger heroes and has a nice throwback aspect to it in many ways. There’s a lot of potential in this series.

Review: The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera

When I saw that I had the opportunity to review The Phantom of the Opera graphic novel, my first thought was, is it going to play music when I open it, like one of those novelty greeting cards? Then I read a little further into the email from A Wave Blue World and knew that I needed to review this title. You see, Hungarian artist Varga Tomi doesn’t take the same approach as Andrew Lloyd Webber or Joel Schumacher. Instead, Tomi gives readers a direct adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s 1910 novel, the inspiration for every other version of The Phantom of the Opera most of us have likely seen before.

Every artistic detail in this graphic novel is gorgeous. From the intricate page layouts to the color choices, to the sophisticated lettering, every page of this book is a work of art. Before starting in on this adaptation, Tomi traveled to Paris to study the city’s architecture. The sketches he made during his travels are directly transposed onto the page. Many panels are framed by the opera house’s architectural design and the building itself looks real. This turns the opera house into a player in the story and not just a background setting.

Tomi’s color choices further elevate his illustrations of the opera house. Tomi uses soft, warm colors for flashbacks. These colors reflect Raoul’s fond memories of his childhood with Christine. The scenes set beneath the opera house really look like they’re set in a cave. Tomi colors these scenes while taking into consideration where the light source is located in each panel. The shadows created by this effect add intensity to scenes that are already spooky.

My only complaint about the art is that I found it difficult to tell certain characters a part. This was especially true for minor characters that appear briefly in a scene and then aren’t seen again until later. Despite this complaint, I do need to mention that the Phantom is very creepy. In other adaptations, the Phantom looks more or less like a normal guy until his mask is removed. Tomi’s Phantom looks like there is something off about him, even when he’s wearing the mask. Tomi draws him with a sinister air, even in the scenes that are set in innocuous locales, such as the parlor of the opera house.

For those who have only seen the musical, the story from the original novel plays out a little differently. Leroux’s novel is a classic example of gothic fiction. These days most people hear “gothic” and think of stories set in a creepy old mansion. With the opera house as a grand backdrop, Tomi chooses to focus on the other elements of gothic fiction, namely hints of the supernatural, an air of forbidden romance, and characters cursed with dark fates. Even though there are differences between the musical’s story and the novel’s, the big moments are still present in the graphic novel, such as the chandelier crash, the masquerade ball, and the underground river. Not to sound like a broken record, but thanks to Tomi’s artistic talents, these big moments look amazing.

This graphic novel adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera is perfect for fans of gothic fiction. It’s the sort of book that a person could buy solely to look at the art. Admittedly, the story within may not appeal to everyone, as it’s different from the version with which they’re most familiar. Tomi also presents a faithful adaptation of Leroux’s novel and doesn’t update any of the language for a modern audience. This doesn’t make for the easiest read for those who aren’t used to reading works from the last century. For those who like the story of The Phantom of the Opera, but don’t care for musicals, this graphic novel is a perfect compromise. If after reading this review, you’re unsure as to whether you want to buy this graphic novel, check out our preview. Don’t be surprised if the beautiful art wins you over immediately. This graphic novel is available now digitally and hits comic book stores on October 21st.

Story: Gaston Leroux Script: Varga Tomi Art: Varga Tomi Letters by Varga Tomi
Story/Adaptation: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.5 Reccomendation: Read

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle Bookshop

Preview: The Phantom of the Opera

The Phantom of the Opera

WRITER: Varga Tomi
ILLUSTRATOR: Varga Tomi
AGE RANGE: General Adult
GENRE: Classic Lit / Horror 
SRP: $16.99
PAGE COUNT: 128
PUB DATE: October 20, 2020
PUBLISHER: A Wave Blue World

Everyone has heard the whispered tales of the phantom who lives beneath the opera house, the mysterious trickster behind all the little mishaps and lost things. But no one has ever seen the monster . . . until now. When the promise of blossoming love lures him out from his intricately constructed hideaways in the labyrinthine building’s walls and cellars, a hideously disfigured artist trains the lovely Christine to be the opera’s next star for a steep price. Does she choose her newfound success or her beloved Count Raoul? This doomed love triangle threatens to combust when a tragic death, a series of betrayals, and increasingly dangerous accidents cast the players of The Palais Garnier into a heart-wrenching horror story that will echo through the ages.

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA, the iconic gothic romance, is retold with all the spectacle its legend demands in this devoted graphic novel adaptation that marries stunning artwork with Gaston Leroux’s haunting prose.

The Phantom of the Opera

ComiXology Delivers Over 150 New Digital Comics For Your New Comic Book Day

Champions #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day! ComiXology has your digital comic needs with over 150 new digital comics available for you right now. You can start shopping or check out the individual issues below that are available today.

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

AfterShock

Albatross Funnybooks

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

Hermes Press

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Legendary Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Papercutz

Red 5 Comics

SAF Comics

Titan Comics

Valiant

Vault

Zenescope


This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle

Exclusive: Ethan Sacks, Anthony Breznican, and Jeff Edwards Talk “A Dangerous Lesson” from the Maybe Someday Anthology

Maybe Someday

Through June, A Wave Blue World has been running a Kickstarter for its latest anthology, Maybe Someday: Stories of Promise, Visions of Hope. The graphic novel anthology is a sequel to All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World which received a Ringo Award nomination for “best anthology.” The anthology features twenty-five stories to lift the spirits of readers and instill the hope of a brighter future. You can find out more about the contributors at the link to the Kickstarter above or here.

We got a chance to talk to three contributors Ethan Sacks, Anthony Breznican, and Jeff Edwards about their contribution “A Dangerous Lesson” which features colors by Andy Poole.

The Kickstarter runs until July 2 at 5pm ET.

Graphic Policy: Ethan and Anthony, you both have backgrounds in journalism as well as other forms of media. Tell us a little more about that and how it led you into writing for comics.

Ethan Sacks: For nearly twenty years, I covered the “geek beat” at the New York Daily News, including comics and over that time I became pretty close friends with Marvel’s Joe Quesada. I ended up pitching him an idea for a story about Greedo. Yes, Greedo. Oddly, he loved it so much, he brought me to then EIC Axel Alonso, and the rest is history. But even though I ended up being a 43-year-old rookie, a lot of skills I learned in journalism helped me get up to speed — sticking to deadlines, an ear for dialogue, and working with editors.

Anthony Breznican: I covered the Marvel Cinematic Universe for years for USA Today and Entertainment Weekly, and had been on the set of so many of those movies, all the Avengers and Captain America films, Black Panther. I always loved the comics that inspired them, but that work immersed me in them in a new way. A comic plays like a movie in the mind, and they can bring such hopefulness and strength and escape to readers. I had previously published a novel and some short stories but had never tackled a graphic novel. It’s much more of a team effort, and Ethan was kind enough to invite me aboard as a rookie to be part of Maybe Someday and the story that would become “A Dangerous Lesson.”

Maybe Someday

GP: Was your story for the “Maybe Someday” anthology the first time you had worked together? How did that go?

ES: Anthony is not only a friend, but someone who I’ve looked up to as a journalist since the days I was covering entertainment for the Daily News. I wouldn’t call him a peer, because that’s like a dude with a guitar in a coffee shop comparing himself to Bruce Springsteen. But we gelled really well on this project, our first (and hopefully not last) collaboration. We used a shared google doc to trade ideas and did a skype summit with Jeff, too. There was no issue melding all our ideas in one story. Just a blast collaborating.

AB: Ethan is exaggerating here. I’m just another guy in a coffee shop, but we’ve known each other for years, and while we both followed the same trajectory in journalism, I was a lost little kid in the woods when it came to writing comics. He really guided me, showed me what needed to be done, how to think about writing for Jeff to interpret. It was Comics Writing 101 for me. It also happened at a time of upheaval in my life, so it was nice to have this fun project to work on, focusing on a glimmer of joy and possibility in the future.

GP: What were the challenges you faced writing a story that was specifically focused on positive visions of the future? Did you feel constrained by this in any way?

ES: For much of my early comic career, I’ve been living in one dystopian post-apocalyptic landscape or another (Old Man Hawkeye, Kiss Zombies), and that’s par for the course with pop culture. Heck, it’s hard not to be pessimistic when you read that Siberia has hit 100 degrees and we’re going backwards with climate change policy. But we shouldn’t forget that there is a younger generation of Gretas stepping up and fighting the good fight. I think we owe it to them to rewire our brains and get off our butts. For this story, I think we looked to where we wanted to go and wrote a path to get there.

AB: I found it a little daunting because you need some conflict to make the story interesting. A field of wildflowers is lovely and peaceful, but it’s not dramatic. So what can we put into that tranquil setting that is exciting, but doesn’t ruin it? We came up with an idea (I believe it was Ethan’s) about a world where the biggest problems we face today have been solved. But how would a society make sure its next-generation doesn’t backslide? We came up with the concept together on a conference call, then Ethan kindly let me devise some characters and subplots for an actual storyline. After that, he took my overlong story and tailored it to fit the pages and the panels we had, and added his own spin to the dialogue.

Maybe Someday

GP: Jeff, tell us more about your background as an artist and how you got involved in this project.

Jeff Edwards: Well, I have been a professional comic book illustrator for about 9 years or so.  I’ve worked on a lot of indie projects, as well as worked with some publishers, but the story of how I got involved with this project is actually a pretty interesting one. You see my first published work was in an international magazine called Film Ink.  Think of a mix between Entertainment Weekly and Wizard magazine.  My role in the project was to illustrate the answers given by Hollywood directors to a specific question, “If you could direct any superhero movie, what would it be?”  Now the only caveat was that only directors who had not yet directed a superhero movie would be a part of the interview.  And who interviewed those directors?  Ethan Sacks.  My first published project, and my first international project, was written by Ethan.  And we have been friends ever since.  We have wanted to work together in the interim years but it just never worked out, so when he asked me if I would be interested I said yeah.  It was a win-win.  I would get to tell a fun and uplifting story that gives a view of the future in a positive light through a sci-fi filter.  I mean what’s not to like!  And on top of that, I got to work with my buddy for the first time.  So yeah, it was a win-win!  I had a great time on it!

ES: I literally stumbled on Jeff at an airport on the way to San Diego Comic-Con in 2010. He was sketching and just giving the drawings to the little kids that were engrossed by his work. Just a selfless, kind, talented dude. At the time, I was the movie editor for Wizard Magazine and I just thought, I’m going to make it my business to work with this guy.

AB: This is the first I’ve worked with Jeff, and he’s like this joyful barbarian, with a big heart, big energy, and a big bushy beard. I knew his work on Transformers and Batman, and we seemed to have grown up loving the same robots, monsters, and heroes. Every page that would come through on Maybe Someday was a mindblower. He’s incredible.

Maybe Someday

GP: Did you do much to adjust your style of storytelling process to fit with the direction of the script?

JE: Well as an artist who grew up on superhero comics, I’d be lying if I said I didn’t make changes to my process.  There are no capes, no superpowers, no fistfights. All of which I love!  But that wasn’t what this story was about. “A Dangerous Lesson” is about interpersonal connections and relationships. It’s about showing what might happen if we achieve the ambitious goal of a brighter, cleaner, more beautiful tomorrow.  And to be fair, I haven’t strictly stayed in the superhero genre my entire career. I have worked up stories that range from noir, horror, hard-boiled detective thrillers, to choose-your-own-adventure-style stories depicting a post-apocalyptic end of the world. So having that range served me well on this project. I wanted to focus on the person-to-person dynamics, the subtleties.  And from the beginning of the layouts stage, I was focused in that direction. I also had to change up my visual style a bit. I like to abstract, or cartoon my figures a little bit if the project is a superhero story.  I switch over into a bit more of the dynamic figure for my superhero projects. But with “A Dangerous Lesson,” I wanted to give the characters normal proportions. Which is a subtle change, but it’s there. It was actually one of the more enjoyable parts for me. I rarely get to draw a more realistic figure, I rarely get to do a non-superhero story, so the change of pace was fun!

GP: What makes this the right time for an anthology like this? Do you feel it can have a lasting effect?

ES: We’re in an era that is incredibly cynical, and it’s hard not to feel pessimistic about the state of the United States and the world. We wrote this story before the global pandemic, but it has felt like we’re hurtling towards the type of dystopian apocalyptic future that has long been predicted by comics, movies, and other pop culture. But then you see a younger generation really galvanized to march, organize, and advocate, and you start thinking maybe there’s hope we’ll get our act together. I think it is high time that we change the narrative that everything is bleak and hopeless and start doing something to make the world a little better. For us, this is just a start.

JE: Hmmm…  well, I don’t think there is a wrong time for a story that focuses on a positive future. Don’t get me wrong, I love a dark and gritty, post-apocalyptic tale!  But there is so much negativity constantly bombarding folks everyday in the real world. So I think that a story like this, an anthology with imagining the future in an uplifting way as the focus, I think it can help people today, tomorrow and always. Any time when there are folks out there who need a twenty minute break, or however long it takes to read the story, any time when folks need a break from all the negativity surrounding them, then that is the right time for a story like this.

I hope it can have a lasting effect, I really do.

AB: These guys said it. I think the hard thing right now is hopelessness. That’s where I struggle nowadays. “How are we ever going to get out of this?” I find myself much like Bill Paxton in Aliens — ”That’s it, man. Game over!” Ripley kept her eye on the future, on surviving. This story and collection shows you a better future. It’s a best case scenario, and aspirational, but perhaps it can play a hopeful song in your head: “Wouldn’t it be niiiiice …?”

Maybe Someday

GP: With everything going on in the world and how much the comics industry has had to change to adapt, are you still hopeful about the future of comics?

JE: I am hopeful yes. Actually I am more than that, I am confident about the future of comics. Let’s be clear, people have always told stories.  Always.  There are cave paintings that are thousands of years old, and they tell a variety of tales. There’s ancient paintings on walls and pottery. So we are a storytelling species. And I think that there are still a lot of folks out there who love their stories told in the comic book medium. So yes I am confident. The industry, like any other, will adapt, it will evolve and I am pretty excited to see where it goes!

ES: Comics have survived nearly a century, through the Seduction of the Innocent witch hunts of the 50s through the economic collapse of the ‘90s and beyond, and we’re still surviving. There’s no doubt that the pandemic really exposed some issues with the economics, but at the end of the day, many the highest-grossing movies in recent years have started in the four-color pages of the comics, so we’re just five to ten years ahead of much of the rest of pop culture. What annoys me is there’s so much more to this medium than superheroes and if we could get more eyeballs to see that, man what a treasure trove of visual literature is out there for the future readers.

AB: Agreed. Comics have proven their staying power. And they are the raw material, the scientific storytelling experiments that are like the research and development lab for other kinds of much more expensive TV and cinematic storytelling. As Ethan said, these are the cave paintings that contain our hopes, dreams, and sometimes nightmares. Once you visualize those things, you can wrap your mind around them.

GP: Is there anything you can share with us about upcoming projects or what to expect from you in the future?

ES: I am continuing with Marvel’s Star Wars: Bounty Hunters and I just launched a project I’m very proud of called, COVID Chronicles, for Axel Alonso’s Upshot imprint at AWA Studios. It’s first-person accounts of people on the frontlines of the global pandemic and it’s my first foray into non-fiction. I’m so proud of the work, but if I’m honest, it’s entirely buoyed by the people sharing their stories and the art of Dalibor Talajic. Anytime A Wave New World wants to work with me again, I’m there. That goes for working with Anthony and Jeff, too.

JE: For a while now I have been putting out covers, so there might be more of that in the future! I am also developing my own project, and I am extremely excited about it. I have other irons in the fire, but I can’t talk about them just yet.  But if anyone out there wants to keep up to date with my projects, the best place to go is my website or my social networks! I’m mostly on Facebook and Instagram. I have a Twitter but to be fair, it’s pretty anemic!  HA!

AB: I’ve been focused on my new work as a Los Angeles correspondent for Vanity Fair, which has been all-consuming, but is an absolute dream job. As with Maybe Someday, I find myself on one of the greatest teams ever assembled, and that gives me a lot to live up to. I like that, though. It’s a good thing to have friends and colleagues who inspire you. That’s how we live up to our better selves, and how we get to a better future like the one Maybe Someday shows us on a vast scale.

GP: Thanks so much and can’t wait to read this story and the entire anthology!

Check out the exclusive look at the story below:

It’s New Comic Book Day and ComiXology Has Your Digital Comic Needs Covered!

Wonder Woman: Agent of Peace #7

It’s new comic book day and while you can go get new comics at your local shop you can also get them at the touch of a button as well! ComiXology has your hookup with over 125 new comics to enjoy this week from Marvel, DC, IDW, BOOM!, Dynamite, and more! There’s something for everyone.

You can start buying now or check out the individual issues below!

A Wave Blue World

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

Abstract Studio

AfterShock

American Mythology

Archie Comics

AWA Studios

BOOM! Studios

Clover Press

comiXology Submit

Darby Pop Publishing

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

DC Thomson

Dynamite Entertainment

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Lion Forge Comics

Marvel

Oni Press

Red 5 Comics

Tidalwave Productions

Titan Comics

Top Shelf Productions

Valiant Comics

Vault Comics

Virus

Zenescope

A Wave Blue World Kickstarts Maybe Someday: Stories of Promise, Visions of Hope

Maybe Someday: Stories of Promise, Visions of Hope

A Wave Blue World has announced the launch of its latest anthology, Maybe Someday: Stories of Promise, Visions of Hope which is now raising funds on Kickstarter. The graphic novel anthology is a sequel to All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World which received a Ringo Award nomination for “best anthology.”

Maybe Someday is a new full-color anthology presenting over twenty-five aspirational stories to lift the spirits of readers and instill the hope that a brighter future is possible. Maybe Someday also reunites the publisher with the editorial team of Matt Miner and Eric Palicki.

The Maybe Someday Kickstarter campaign, running through the entire month of June, offers a Kickstarter exclusive cover, which is only available to backers. The cover art is by Max Dunbar with colors by Espen Grundetjern. Logo and cover design are by Tim Daniel. A different cover by this same team will be featured on the direct market edition when the book comes out later this year.

Other rewards include a digital sketchbook, signed bookplates, and combo packs of previously published anthologies.

Check out the full list of creators taking part, it’s a who’s who of comic talent:

Natasha Alterici, Alejandro Aragon, Darren Auck, Max Bemis, Anthony Breznican, Ryan Cady, Mario Candelaria, Joe Caramagna, Tyler Chin-Tanner, Gab Contreras, Shawn Daley, Jono Diener, Jeff Edwards, Greg Anderson Elysee, Mike Feehan, Ryan Ferrier, Joe Glass, Isaac Goodhart, Adam Gorham, Hagai, Ray-Anthony Height, Josh Hood, Daniel Kibblesmith, Konner Knudsen, Michael Kupperman, Alisa Kwitney, Valentine De Landro, Robert Lee, Yasmin Liang, Mauricet, John McFarlane, Matt Miner, Christopher Mitten, Michael Moreci, Steve Niles, Eric Palicki, Emily Pearson, Stephanie Phillips, Curt Pires, Sebastian Piriz, Andy Poole, Nick Pyle, Rod Reis, Renfamous, Marco Rudy, Ethan Sacks, Phillip Sevy, Erica Shultz, Martin Simmonds, Aubrey Sitterson, Stelladia, Sally Jane Thompson, Zoe Thorogood, Bobby Timony, and Rockwell White.

A Wave Blue World’s Dead Legends Gets a Sequel

After the success of the first volume of Dead Legends, publisher A Wave Blue World has signed the creative team, James Maddox and Gavin Smith, to develop a sequel for a 2021 release.

Debuting this January, Dead Legends Vol. 1 introduced the readers to Yan Nakamura, a widow who enters the world’s deadliest martial arts tournament to get revenge on her husband’s killer.

In this new arc, Yan is on the run with her newborn baby in tow. Aided by the friends she made at the tournament, Red Death and Barbosa, Yan soon realizes that the Tiger Clan’s quest for revenge will never end. She concludes that her daughter’s only chance to grow up in safety is to head back to the Dead Legends tournament.

Also making their return to the series will be letterer, Ryan Ferrier, and editor, Joseph Illidge.

As with Dead Legends Vol. 1, Vol. 2 will be released as part of AWBW’s Premier Program, where the first issue will be distributed in print, followed by a bi-weekly release of the remaining digital issues. Then the full trade paperback drops 2 months after the Premier Edition, allowing readers the choice of how they’d like to read the series without having to wait a prolonged period for the full story.

Preview: Cayrels Ring

Cayrels Ring

WRITER: Shannon Lentz
ILLUSTRATORS: Various
COVER: Dustin Weaver
TRIM: 7.75 x 10.875
AGE RANGE: General Adult
GENRE: Science Fiction
SRP: $25
FORMAT: Hardcover
PAGE COUNT: 136
PUB DATE: March 18, 2020
ISBN #: 9781949518061
ITEM CODE: JAN201548
PUBLISHER: A Wave Blue World

The book, written by Shannon Lentz with art by an extraordinary array of modern sci-fi comics’ greatest artists, is a unique reading experience — a single-story anthology that can be read as both a novel or as a collection of short stories that serve as windows into life in a far-flung colonized galaxy. Folks like Farel Dalrymple, Simon Roy, François Vigneault, and Dustin Weaver give it a unique, Euro-inspired look you may recall from the critically acclaimed Image Comics Prophet revival. Shannon’s experience with tabletop game world-building (he’s the founder of the Terminal City Tabletop Convention) and chemical science (his day job!) gives the book an absorbing, realistic lived-in environment that the book’s diverse chapters invite you to explore in depth.

And grounding our journey through daily life in Cayrels Ring, vignette by thrilling vignette, is the powerful overarching story of scientist Jamitch Taylee’s desperate, decades-long search for his missing family, and that of his granddaughter Nella, trying to eke out a life in the harsh conditions of that unforgiving frontier.

Cayrels Ring
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