Review: The Mighty Thor #706

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**POSSIBLE SPOILERS BELOW**

She was The Mighty Thor! She has thunder in her veins!

This may feel like the end, but it isn’t. Jason Aaron will continue writing Odinson in the upcoming Thor #1 which will be the next issue following this comic, The Mighty Thor #706. It is a bittersweet ending, but the legacy of Jane Foster as The Mighty Thor will now be cemented into Marvel lore. There were many detractors of a female holding Mjölnir high into the sky and having the power of a god, but I was not one of them. To describe the amazing world building and storytelling that Jason Aaron has achieved in this comic for the last few years as a simple market ploy or being too politically correct would be an injustice. The way it was done made sense. The respect the to the title and the lore were given were tremendous. Jane was Thor, and she was an awesome Thor.

The brilliance of having a character who questions Gods and their selfish actions, becoming one herself, but still in her heart and soul being a mortal, and a sick one at that, is inspiring. Jane Foster was such a good Thor in fact, that she even got Odinson to notice his own selfishness, and in turn affect his own legacy as The God of Thunder going forward. Even the grouchy and smug Odin had to stand in awe at the bravery Jane showed facing off against the Mangog. She demonstrated to all of Asgard what it means to be a hero, and a super hero at that. Even when she knew it would hurt her more and more each time she donned the hammer, she knew she had to do the right thing, and for that, she belongs in Valhalla.

Thor comics have always married the lore of Norse mythology and the superhero world beautifully. There are some classic runs, and now Aaron and Dauterman belong in those conversations. It was consistently the best Marvel comic every month for years in my opinion, and I am excited to see where Aaron goes with another one of my favorite artists, Mike Del Mundo. Speaking of art, it would be a crime to not talk about the beautiful work that Russell Dauterman and company produce each week. Whether it be the jaw dropping covers, or the interiors that are colored like paintings by Matthew Wilson, this team goes above and beyond. The last issue was drawn so well with a sense of violence, despair, then hope, and just layers of emotion that you could feel jumping off of the page and into your senses. With this issue, it’s a slower pace. It allows us to reflect, to take it all in, to cry if we so wish, and mostly to just say goodbye to a truly special arc and run that is nothing short of epic and iconic.

I love where this book leaves us, and it has a fantastic twist, ending, and set up for the new #1 coming shortly. This will give longtime fans their Odinson back, while proudly ending the book without cancelling it or Marvel listening to so many people telling them how the stories should be written. This comic was a perfect balance of inclusion, while not forcing anything for the reader. It made sense for Jane to be Thor. It made sense for Odinson to go through some tough times and grow. Now because of her legacy, he is a better Thor. I highly recommend this book, and this run. It’s one of my favorite comics in recent years, and Aaron, Dauterman, and Wilson should get a standing ovation for what they’ve done. I stopped typing to do one now, they just can’t see it.

Story: Jason Aaron Pencils: Russell Dauterman Colors: Matthew Wilson
Letterer: Joe Sabino Cover: Russell Dauterman
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review