Tag Archives: warner bros.

Matt Reeves Delivers a First Look at The Batman’s Batmobile

Director Matt Reeves has Tweeted a look at his concept for the Batmobile appearing in the upcoming The Batman. The film is a “year one” type story focusing on the early career of the Caped Crusader.

As we can see, his early car is much more grounded than the cool tech we’ve seen in other films. The car looks like a modified GTO. It signals what we might expect for the upcoming film when it comes to that.

Warner Bros. Cancels the New York Premiere of Superman: Red Son Due to Coronavirus Concerns

Warner Bros. is playing it safe and canceling their planned New York premiere for Superman: Red Son.

The film was to release on March 16 but due to concern over the disease, the screening will not take place.

In the announcement, Warner Bros. is “placing added emphasis on the health and welfare of its employees, talent, and fans.” It is therefore taking preventative measures.

Superman: Red Son

Director Matt Reeves Teases His Batman

Director Matt Reeves has posted the first look of Robert Pattison as Batman in the now shooting The Batman. The video was shot by the film’s director of photography Greig Fraser with music by the film’s composer Michael Giacchino.

The look is reminiscent of Christopher Nolan’s take on the character in his trilogy. The design has a grounded design about it, like hockey equipment meets skating pads meets police armor. We also get a first look at the new Bat-symbol.

The Batman is set to come to theaters on June 25, 2021.

The Batman – Camera Test from Matt Reeves on Vimeo.

Movie Review: Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)

Birds of Prey

If you go into Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) thinking it’s fanfic brought to life along with subpar cosplay costumes, cheesy dialogue, and gross misinterpretation of some of DC”s most iconic characters, then yes, the movie was good. If you go into the movie, thinking it should ONLY be called “The Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn” or simply “Harley Quinn” instead of “Birds of Prey,” then yes, this was a good movie. If you are able to divorce the fact that you have been a fan of this particular comic series since 1998…if you are able to ignore the fact that there is no freakin’ Barbara Gordon as Oracle (you may remember her as the original pre-“New 52” Batgirl)…then yes, it was a good movie.

But let’s not call it “Birds of Prey”.

Sure, sure. I am aware of how they restructured the fan-favorite comic. I recall vaguely Harley Quinn is a member of the “New 52” version of the Suicide Squad. To be honest, I’m not sure how she ended up associated with Birds of Prey. Maybe when Poison Ivy, her bestie, joined the team? IDK. Even more reason for this movie to have its own title to focus solely on Harley Quinn. Because let’s face it: it was all about her emancipation and a motley crew of DC’s anti-heroines who were just along for the ride. And with all the said, I really enjoyed this movie more than I thought I would!

I don’t know what it was, but Margot Robbie seemed cooler as Harley Quinn than she did in Suicide Squad (which incidentally does not come anywhere close to how entertaining Birds of Prey was). She literally had me laughing out loud within the first few minutes especially when she was like “I’m telling the story the way I effin’ want to!” The more obvious attempts at humor like the Cheez Whiz and her getting super drunk or buying a hyena named Bruce was cute, but that didn’t tickle my funny bone. The more subtle humorous scenes made me bray like a donkey. Liiiike Harley jumping onto the driver’s legs, breaking them, then sitting on his lap and correcting him, telling him she has a Ph.D. (okay so maybe that was not meant to be subtle) or when she held the water with the huge cucumber in the bottle. But honestly, it was the egg sandwich with the possibly expired cheese that did it for me. Real tears. Y’all, she had real tears. And can I just say I literally exclaimed “yasss” EVERY TIME Harley was tearing up those kneecaps with aluminum baseball pats and sledgehammers? She was poetry in motion; violent gory poetry. And the lighter…! We got a chance to see her vulnerable side that finally sold me on Margot Robbie’s take on this hilarious epic character. The “Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend” scene had me hype. So well done.

The rest of the cast was a mixed bag of nuts. And not the good kind.

I’ll start off with this: I am NOT a fan of when they change the ethnicity of a particular character. Especially ones you’ve grown up knowing and loving. With that said, I was not a fan of Jurnee Smollett-Bell being cast as Dinah Lance a.k.a. Black effin’ Canary. But what can you do, right? Also, I was not a fan of the changed origin. But I will give credit where it is due. Jurnee did a good job and the way she kicked some ass was reminiscent of the Black Canary I know and love. I mean, who else can fight like that while wearing stylish tight as hell pants? And she really can sing!

“They call me…Ramona Flowers”. Let me stop, haha. Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Huntress gave me mixed feelings. On one hand, Helena Bertinelli has been a fave of my since my teens so seeing her on the screen was nice. It would have been nicer if she actually, I dunno,  resembled her comic book counterpart? How are you going to go around assassinating people while wearing a Missy Elliot garbage bag poncho and no mask? She was like a lazy cosplayer. I’m sure the comic book version would have used the crossbow on the movie version. I must admit, she does redeem herself. Just a little too late.

Rosie Perez’s Renee Montoya actually surprised me. She was gritty, oddly funny, and true to character. She put me in the mind of Renee’s journey of redemption in 2006’s much-lauded “52” series. I actually sighed with relief when the movie touched on one major part of her character growth. And yes, that tied to the “52” book. I won’t say what it was. I won’t spoil. I’m not a savage. And may I add that Rosie Perez still looks amazing? She was certainly “fighting the power” in this movie. But there was no dancing like in Spike Lee’s “Do The Right Thing”.

And then there’s Cassandra Cain played by Ella Jay Basco. Cute kid. She was your average Forever 21 shopper specializing in early 90’s fashion. Like I said: cute kid. Only the Cassandra Cain we know used to run around in a featureless snitched Batgirl mask and kick some serious ass. We got none of that in this movie! She was a liability throughout the entire movie. If she was not so integral to the plot (stay with me) I would have dragged her by her arm cast to No Man’s Land myself.

Now for the “Big Bad”: Roman Sionis/Black Mask portrayed by the truly versatile Ewan McGregor. He was actually a delight to watch on screen. He was funnier than Jared Leto’s Joker without even trying. I loved his sense of style and his BDSM-esque art involving the black mask was appropriate. Also, I’m positive Chris Messina’s Victor Zsasz was secretly in love with him. He kept saying “eww” and “kay” which was hilarious. But honestly, McGregor has always had the singular talent of becoming whomever he played in a movie. This experience was no different. Birds of Prey is the better for it.

The film didn’t deserve the measly $33 million it grossed opening weekend. As stated before, I so thoroughly enjoyed the insane hijinks of this wildly unpredictable, satisfying, but fanfic-y take on Birds of Prey. I was prepared to go into this movie hating it, but it had the opposite effect. The non-linear storytelling, overall fun and engaging characters, and the fantastic fight scenes (especially when Harley was fighting solo) was something right up my alley. The camaraderie and sense of sisterhood and women empowerment was unmistakable and I’m totally here for that! I would love to see a sequel or spin-off movies. It’s deserving of that. Also, is there a post-credits scene? Yes and no. Go check it out. And let me know what you thought, puddin’.

DCYou Unscripted Announces Judges and Mentors

DCYou Unscripted

DC has announced more details on its DCYou Unscripted Fan contest. Over 1,000 individuals submitted ideas for a chance to see their idea developed as a series.

The team of creative talent and entertainment executives that will mentor the 10 finalists, as well as the panel of judges, have been announced.

The 10 finalists will head to DC’s headquarters to meet with industry veterans to help refine their pitches. The mentors assisting the finalists are Dan Evans, Vice President, Creative Affairs and Creative Services, DC, Bridgette Theriault, Senior Vice President, Development, Telepictures, and Phil Jimenez, DC Writer and Artist.

The contestants will have five minutes to pitch to DC Publisher and Chief Creative Officer Jim Lee, DC Publisher Dan DiDio, and Stage 13 Senior Vice President and General Manager Diana Mogollon, followed by a five-minute question and answer round.

The creative finalists include:

  • Cameron Barger – Seattle, WA
  • Molly Brady – Los Angeles, CA
  • Steven Holloway – Jersey City, NJ
  • Courtney Johnson – Washington, D.C.
  • Royce Miller – Bridgewater, SD
  • Alexis Pivincy – Los Angeles, CA
  • Elora Powell – Tigard, OR
  • William Spear – East Brunswick, NJ
  • Will Stewart & Ben Barlow – Atlanta, GA
  • Michael Toulson – Cooperstown, NY

The pitch event will air on two special episodes of DC Daily on DC Universe on January 23 and 24, 2020. The three finalists who receive a pilot order will be announced on January 24.

Birds of Prey Gets a Second Trailer

With less than a month to go, Birds of Prey has gotten a second trailer giving us a better idea as to what we can expect. Gotham’s worst brings out their best. Meet Harley Quinn, Black Canary, Huntress, Renee Montoya, and Cassandra Cain.

You ever hear the one about the cop, the songbird, the psycho and the mafia princess? Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) is a twisted tale told by Harley herself, as only Harley can tell it. When Gotham’s most nefariously narcissistic villain, Roman Sionis, and his zealous right-hand, Zsasz, put a target on a young girl named Cass, the city is turned upside down looking for her. Harley, Huntress, Black Canary and Renee Montoya’s paths collide, and the unlikely foursome have no choice but to team up to take Roman down.

Margot Robbie returns as Harley Quinn, alongside Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Huntress; Jurnee Smollett-Bell as Black Canary; Rosie Perez as Renee Montoya; Chris Messina as Victor Zsasz; and Ewan McGregor as Roman Sionis. Newcomer Ella Jay Basco also stars as Cassandra “Cass” Cain in her feature film debut.

Directed by Cathy Yan from a script by Christina Hodson, the film is based on characters from DC Comics.

Birds of Prey is in theaters February 7, 2020.

Around the Tubes

The New Mutants

It’s new comic book day tomorrow! What’s everyone excited for? What do you plan on getting? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that, here’s some comic news from around the web.

IGN – The New Mutants: The Demon Bear and Soulsword Explained – For those who want to know a bit about the upcoming film.

Newsarama – Warner Bros. Adapting Kot & Moore’s The New World – Report – Interesting.

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: Worlds collide in Namesake – Free comics!

Joker Wins Two at the Golden Globes as the Film’s Composer Hildur Guðnadóttir Makes History

Joker

It was a good night for Joker at last night’s Golden Globes. The controversial film won two awards by evening’s end.

Hildur Guðnadóttir won for “Best Original Score” making history. The composer is the first solo woman to win a Golden Globe in the category. Lisa Gerrard was a co-winner with Hans Zimmer for Gladiator in 2000 and Karen O was the last woman to be nominated, shared with Carter Burwell, in 2009 for Where the Wild Things Are.

Guðnadóttir is bringing in the awards. She won an Emmy for scoring Chernobyl and she’s nominated for a Grammy. She’s also nominated for both Joker and Chernobyl at the Society of Composers and Lyricists’ awards, happening Tuesday night at the Skirball Center.

Director Todd Phillips discovered her music in Sicario: Day of the Soldado and sought her out for his film. Phillips provided her with the script and had her “take it from there.” The score was played on set so reactions to the music are in real-time.

Joaquin Phoenix also walked away a winner for “Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama” for his leading role in the film.

The film also lost in two categories. The movie lost to 1917 for “Best Motion Picture – Drama” and Todd Phillips lost to Sam Menders for “Best Director – Motion Picture.”

The controversial film with just a $55 million budget has gone on to earn over $1 billion making it one of the most profitable films ever.

Get a First Look at the Animated Phantom Stranger with 2 Stills

The upcoming release of Superman: Red Son includes the all-new DC Showcase animated short, Phantom Stranger. Warner Bros. has released the first images from Phantom Stranger depicting the two lead characters – the Phantom Stranger (voiced by Peter Serafinowicz of The Tick fame) and the mysterious Seth (voiced by Smallville‘s Michael Rosenbaum). 

Phantom Stranger has Bruce Timm at the helm as executive producer & director, and the short is written by Ernie Altbacker.

Set in the 1970s, the short follows young adult Jess as she joins her friends at a party in a dilapidated mansion hosted by the mysterious Seth. When odd things begin to happen to Jess and her friends, the Phantom Stranger intervenes to try and save her from a dreary fate.

In addition to Serafinowicz and Rosenbaum, Phantom Stranger also features the voices of Natalie Lander, Grey Griffin, and Roger Craig Smith.

DC’s acclaimed Elseworlds story, Superman: Red Son, the next entry in the popular series of DC Universe Movies, arrives from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment on Digital starting February 25, 2020, and on 4K Ultra HD Combo Pack and Blu-ray Combo Pack on March 17, 2020.

Joker Nominated for 4 Golden Globes, Watchmen Snubbed

Joker

Today, the nominees for the 77th Golden Globes were announced. Joker was nominated for four awards including “Best Motion Picture,” “Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama,” “Best Director – Motion Picture,” and “Best Original Score – Motion Picture.”

Joker crossed the billion-dollar mark in the last few weeks and the controversial film is one of the most profitable in history.

Watchmen, an expansion of the heralded comic, was snubbed in this year’s awards. The show which focuses on the generational trauma of an African-American family was one of the highest profile snubs, especially due to its praise.

Check out below for the full list of nominees.

Best Motion Picture – Drama

  • “The Irishman” (Netflix)
  • “Marriage Story” (Netflix)
  • “1917” (Universal)
  • “Joker” (Warner Bros.)
  • “The Two Popes” (Netflix)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

  • Cynthia Erivo (“Harriet”)
  • Scarlett Johansson (“Marriage Story”)
  • Saoirse Ronan (“Little Women”)
  • Charlize Theron (“Bombshell”)
  • Renée Zellweger (“Judy”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

  • Christian Bale (“Ford v Ferrari”)
  • Antonio Banderas (“Pain and Glory”)
  • Adam Driver (“Marriage Story”)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (“Joker”)
  • Jonathan Pryce (“The Two Popes”)

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • “Dolemite Is My Name” (Netflix)
  • “Jojo Rabbit” (Fox Searchlight)
  • “Knives Out” (Lionsgate)
  • “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” (Sony)
  • “Rocketman” (Paramount)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • Ana de Armas (“Knives Out”)
  • Awkwafina (“The Farewell”)
  • Cate Blanchett (“Where’d You Go, Bernadette”)
  • Beanie Feldstein (“Booksmart”)
  • Emma Thompson (“Late Night”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • Daniel Craig (“Knives Out”)
  • Roman Griffin Davis (“Jojo Rabbit”)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)
  • Taron Egerton (“Rocketman”)
  • Eddie Murphy (“Dolemite Is My Name”)

Best Motion Picture – Animated

  • “Frozen 2” (Disney)
  • “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” (Universal)
  • “The Lion King” (Disney)
  • “Missing Link” (United Artists Releasing)
  • “Toy Story 4” (Disney)

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language

  • “The Farewell” (A24)
  • “Les Misérables” (Amazon)
  • “Pain and Glory” (Sony Pictures Classics)
  • “Parasite” (Neon)
  • “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” (Neon)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture

  • Kathy Bates (“Richard Jewell”)
  • Annette Bening (“The Report”)
  • Laura Dern (“Marriage Story”)
  • Jennifer Lopez (“Hustlers”)
  • Margot Robbie (“Bombshell”)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture

  • Tom Hanks (“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”)
  • Anthony Hopkins (“The Two Popes”)
  • Al Pacino (“The Irishman”)
  • Joe Pesci (“The Irishman”)
  • Brad Pitt (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Bong Joon-ho (“Parasite”)
  • Sam Mendes (“1917”)
  • Todd Phillips (“Joker”)
  • Martin Scorsese (“The Irishman”)
  • Quentin Tarantino (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • Noah Baumbach (“Marriage Story”)
  • Bong Joon-ho and Han Jin-won (“Parasite”)
  • Anthony McCarten (“The Two Popes”)
  • Quentin Tarantino (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)
  • Steven Zaillian (“The Irishman”)

Best Original Score – Motion Picture

  • Alexandre Desplat (“Little Women”)
  • Hildur Guðnadóttir (“Joker”)
  • Randy Newman (“Marriage Story”)
  • Thomas Newman (“1917”)
  • Daniel Pemberton (“Motherless Brooklyn”)

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • “Beautiful Ghosts” (“Cats”)
  • “I’m Gonna Love Me Again” (“Rocketman”)
  • “Into the Unknown” (“Frozen 2”)
  • “Spirit” (“The Lion King”)
  • “Stand Up” (“Harriet”)

Best Television Series – Drama

  • “Big Little Lies” (HBO)
  • “The Crown” (Netflix)
  • “Killing Eve” (BBC America)
  • “The Morning Show” (Apple TV Plus)
  • “Succession” (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

  • Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)
  • Olivia Colman (“The Crown”)
  • Jodie Comer (“Killing Eve”)
  • Nicole Kidman (“Big Little Lies”)
  • Reese Witherspoon (“The Morning Show”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

  • Brian Cox (“Succession”)
  • Kit Harington (“Game of Thrones”)
  • Rami Malek (“Mr. Robot”)
  • Tobias Menzies (“The Crown”)
  • Billy Porter (“Pose”)

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy

  • “Barry” (HBO)
  • “Fleabag” (Amazon)
  • “The Kominsky Method” (Netflix)
  • “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)
  • “The Politician” (Netflix)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

  • Christina Applegate (“Dead to Me”)
  • Rachel Brosnahan (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”)
  • Kirsten Dunst (“On Becoming a God in Central Florida”)
  • Natasha Lyonne (“Russian Doll”)
  • Phoebe Waller-Bridge (“Fleabag”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

  • Michael Douglas (“The Kominsky Method”)
  • Bill Hader (“Barry”)
  • Ben Platt (“The Politician”)
  • Paul Rudd (“Living with Yourself”)
  • Ramy Youssef (“Ramy”)

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • “Catch-22″ (Hulu)
  • “Chernobyl” (HBO)
  • “Fosse/Verdon” (FX)
  • The Loudest Voice (Showtime)
  • “Unbelievable” (Netflix)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Kaitlyn Dever (“Unbelievable”)
  • Joey King (“The Act”)
  • Helen Mirren (“Catherine the Great”)
  • Merritt Wever (“Unbelievable”)
  • Michelle Williams (“Fosse/Verdon”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Christopher Abbott (“Catch-22”)
  • Sacha Baron Cohen (“The Spy”)
  • Russell Crowe (“The Loudest Voice”)
  • Jared Harris (“Chernobyl”)
  • Sam Rockwell (“Fosse/Verdon”)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Patricia Arquette (“The Act”)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (“The Crown”)
  • Toni Collette (“Unbelievable”)
  • Meryl Streep (“Big Little Lies”)
  • Emily Watson (“Chernobyl”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Alan Arkin (“The Kominsky Method”)
  • Kieran Culkin (“Succession”)
  • Andrew Scott (“Fleabag”)
  • Stellan Skarsgård (“Chernobyl”)
  • Henry Winkler (“Barry”)
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