Tag Archives: walter simonson

Karl Kesel and Tom Grummett Return this April to Section Zero

The award winning team of writer Karl Kesel and artist Tom Grummett return to their fan-favorite, critically acclaimed series, Section Zero. The science-fiction adventure is set to launch from Image Comics and Shadowline Comics this April. 

Section Zero kicks off with Part One: “Ground Zero,” where readers meet a team of fearless adventurers. Together the crew uncovers the secrets behind UFOs, monsters, and lost civilizations in a story that can best be described as, “Jack Kirby does The X-Files.” 

Section Zero will feature alternate covers by super-star artists including Walter Simonson, George Perez, Adam Hughes, Dave Gibbons, Mike Wieringo, and many more! 

Section Zero #1 by Cover A by Kesel & Grummett (Diamond Code FEB190024), Cover B by Walter Simonson (Diamond Code FEB190025), and Cover C by Jerry Ordway (Diamond Code FEB190026).

Section Zero #1 Cover A
Section Zero #1 Cover B
Section Zero #1 Cover C

Relive the X-Men’s Biggest Events with X-Men Milestones

They are the tales of triumph and tragedy that changed Marvel’s mutants forever…and now, fans everywhere can relive these stories in a new series of trade paperbacks designed to form one complete library of X-Men events!

To start, dive into history with the tragic Jean Grey story that rocked the X-Men and the Marvel Universe in Dark Phoenix Saga by Chris Claremont and John Byrne! Brace yourself as the specter of death looms over three X-teams in Fall of the Mutants by Claremont, Louise Simonson, Marc Silvestri, Bret Blevins and Walter Simonson! And charge into the epic battle between the Morlocks and the Marauders in Mutant Massacre by Claremont, Louise Simonson, Walter Simonson, Ann Nocenti, John Romita Jr., Blevins, Rick Leonardi, Alan Davis, Barry Windsor-Smith, Terry Shoemaker, Butch Guice, Sal Buscema and Jon Bogdanove!

With this new collection, relive the X-Men’s best and the biggest storylines as their adventures remind you why the X-Men have been a cornerstone of the Marvel Universe for decades!

What other earth-shattering events will follow? Stay tuned to Marvel for more…

X-MEN MILESTONES: DARK PHOENIX SAGA

By Chris Claremont and John Byrne

X-MEN MILESTONES: FALL OF THE MUTANTS

By Chris Claremont, Louise Simonson, Marc Silvestri, Bret Blevins and Walter Simonson

X-MEN MILESTONES: MUTANT MASSACRE

By Chris Claremont, Louise Simonson, Walter Simonson, Ann Nocenti, John Romita Jr., Blevins, Rick Leonardi, Alan Davis, Barry Windsor-Smith, Terry Shoemaker, Butch Guice, Sal Buscema and Jon Bogdanove!

Red Sonja 45th Anniversary Foil Trading Card Box, Out Now

Red Sonja 45th Anniversary Foil Trading Card Box

artists: J. Scott Campbell, Frank Thorne, Walter Simonson, Amanda Conner, John Buscema, Fiona Staples, Jenny Frison, Jay Anacleto, Juan Doe, Mike McKone, Amy Reeder, Lucio Parrillo, Art Baltazar, Anthony Marques, Guiseppe Camuncoli, Stephanie Buscema, Dick Giordano, Jonboy Meyers, Mel Rubi, Joseph Michael Linsner, more
2.5” x 3.5” | Individual, 7-card foil pack: $89.99 | Teen+
2.5” x 3.5” | Box of 12 foil packs: $1,079.88 | Teen+

A Deluxe-Premiere set featuring a select group of Red Sonja’s most renowned artists portraying the “She-Devil with a Sword” in all of her savage, majestic beauty! This set includes an 18 card base set, PLUS Dynamite chase cards that include: 6 autographed cards, 3 B&W art cards, 9-card puzzle cards, 2-box-topper special cards, special bonus chase cards, and hand-drawn, original art, signed sketch cards!

Every autographed card featuring a color ink or ultra-rare, gold ink signature!

Every individual foil pack includes 2 Base Cards, 2 sketch cards, 1 B&W art card, 1 puzzle card, and 1 autographed card.

Every specially designed, 4-color box includes 12 foil packs.

Review: Iron Man 2020

Who is Arno Stark? Marvel has a trade, Iron Man 2020 that’ll help you find out! Iron Man 2020 collects Amazing Spider-Man Annual (1964) #20, Machine Man (1984) #1-4, Death’s Head #10, Iron Man 2020 #1, Astonishing Tales: Iron Man 2020 #1-6, and material from What If? (1989) #53 written by Ken McDonald, Fred Schiller, Tom DeFalco, Simon Furman, Walter Simonson, and Daniel Merlin Goodbrey, and illustrated by Mark Beachum, Herb Trimpe, Barry Windsor-Smith, Bryan Hitch, William Rosado, Bob Wiacek, Lou Kang, and Manny Galan.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: True Believers Fantastic Four by Walter Simonson #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We’ve got a classic reprinted and released a few weeks ago!

True Believers Fantastic Four by Walter Simonson #1 reprints Fantastic Four #337 by Walter Simonson, Bill Oakley, and Max Scheele.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Walter Simonson’s Battlestar Galactica Art Edition HC

Walter Simonson’s Battlestar Galactica Art Edition HC

writers: Walter Simonson, Roger McKenzie, Bob Layton, Steven Grant
artist | cover: Walter Simonson
FC | 104 pages | $150.00 | Teen +

Walter Simonson’s Battlestar Galactica Art Edition commemorates the master draftsman’s senses-shattering work on the Battlestar Galactica comic book series published by Marvel Comics from 1979 to 1981. Truly, the adventures of brash pilots Apollo and Starbuck were never so epic as they were under Simonson’s skillful hand, as demonstrated in this gorgeous hardcover collection. Scanned in high-resolution color and printed at original size, the Battlestar Galactica Art Edition preserves every detail of the artist’s meticulous skill and hard work, interpreted from scripts by contributing writers Roger McKenzie, Steven Grant, Bill Mantlo, Bob Layton, and Simonson himself!

Preview: The Mighty Thor #706

The Mighty Thor #706

Story: Jason Aaron
Art: Russell Dauterman
Color: Matthew Wilson
Letterer: VC’s Joe Sabino
Cover: Russell Dauterman
Variant Covers: Walter Simonson, Laura Martin; Marco Checchetto; Mark Bagley, Andrew Hennessy, Dave McCaig
Editor: Wil Moss
Associate Editor: Sarah Brunstad
Rated T+
In Shops: Apr 25, 2018
SRP: $3.99

AT THE GATES OF VALHALLA!
THE DEATH OF THE MIGHTY THOR finale
• The battle against the Mangog is finished. And the losses have been profound.
• So what – if anything – remains of the story of Jane Foster, Goddess of Thunder?
• And where do the other gods possibly go from here?

It’s Alive! to publish Combat by Sam Glanzman with covers by Russ Braun, Russ Heath, and Walt Simonson. Back it on Kickstarter Now!

IDW Publishing‘s It’s Alive! imprint has announced the upcoming Kickstarter to bring select issues of the classic Combat comic book series by Sam Glanzman back to print! Three issues are being Kickstarted by Eisner-nominated It’s Alive! publisher Drew Ford. Two of the three issues have already been successfully Kickstarted, but all three will be available in the new campaign featuring incredible variant cover art. The Dunkirk issue has a variant cover by comic book superstar Walter Simonson, the Battle of Midway issue has a variant cover by comic book living legend Russ Heath, and the new D-Day issue has a variant cover by fan-favorite artist Russ Braun!

Each issue also has a standard cover created using artwork by the late Sam Glanzman, and all six comics are up for grabs in the new Kickstarter. Also, there will be a limited number of signed copies of the variant covers by Simonson, Heath, and Braun! Combat is a legendary comic book, that told true stories of WWII month after month, for several years. There was, in fact, 26 issues in all, and Sam Glanzman illustrated all of them! It’s Alive! will reprint these incredible comics, giving a whole new generation of readers a chance to discover and enjoy classic WWII war comics.

As some extra incentive to pledge now, for one week only there will be a handful of Early Bird Special rewards that folks will want to grab before they disappear!

Check out the Combat Kickstarter which will be active from now until the evening of Sunday, March 25, 2018.

Preview: The Kamandi Challenge #11

The Kamandi Challenge #11

(W) Rob Williams (A) Walter Simonson (CA) Nick Bradshaw
In Shops: Nov 22, 2017
SRP: $3.99

After the jaw-dropping ending of last issue, Rob Williams and comics legend Walter Simonson take our hero to new heights… space! It’s the penultimate issue of this acclaimed round-robin series, and the mysterious Misfit has imprisoned Kamandi on his mothership headed on a one-way trip to the Tek-Moon! Now, Kamandi must decide between finding his parents and escaping his captors for good. It’s time for the last boy on earth to become a man. Will he be up to the challenge?

Movie Review: Thor: Ragnarok

Thor_Ragnarok_SDCC_PosterThor’s outings in the Marvel Cinematic Universe have been. . . uneven at best, to put it kindly. Indeed, Thor: The Dark World remains the unequivocal nadir of the MCU’s otherwise good track record. But given that and Avengers: Age of Ultron also being less than stellar — the last two times we saw our Asgardian hero — you might come in to this film with zero expectations.

Prepare to be blown away by one of the best movies in the MCU and certainly Thor’s best film appearance to date. 

Chris Hemsworth reprises his role as the Norse God of Thunder. Reunited with his presumed-dead brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston), they track down their missing father Odin (Anthony Hopkins), who reveals a deep family secret — an older sister, Hela (Cate Blanchett), the goddess of death who has her sights set on the Asgardian throne.

Various misadventures find Thor reunited with fellow Avenger The Hulk / Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo), against whom he is pitted in gladiatorial combat reminiscent of the storyline in Planet Hulk. They must escape back to Asgard to take on Hela with the help of a recalcitrant Valkyrie (Tessa Thompson) who is probably the best part of the movie and given some of the most fun action pieces and one of the best character arcs of any person in the film.

But don’t be fooled into thinking most of this is a Planet Hulk movie. Its roots go far deeper than the relatively recent storyline. But if you take one part Planet Hulk, plus equal amounts Jack Kirby and Walt Simonson classic Thor, that’s the comics cocktail from which this springs.

The ringmaster for this particular circus is director Taika Waititi, who delivers something truly unexpected: different kind of Marvel movie. One of the most common complaints against the MCU is how similar / unoriginal / mass produced they feel. Thor: Ragnarok defies that claim with its humor, characters, visuals, and soundtrack.

This movie is funny. Of course, that should be of no surprise to those who know Waititi for his time working on Flight of the Conchords or his previous films What We Do in the Shadows and Hunt for the Wilderpeople. It’s a very specific humor which is undeniably Kiwi in its politeness, awkwardness, and wry sense of irony — and wholly different from Joss Whedon’s or James Gunn’s much broader humor in The Avengers or Guardians of the Galaxy films.

Waititi also brings along some familiar faces to those who know his other films, including Rachel House, who plays a lackey of Jeff Goldblum‘s The Grandmaster in Ragnarok, is very similar to the character she played in Wilderpeople. And Waititi himself shows up (as he is wont to do in his own films) as Korg, a rock-person gladiator who ends up with some of the funniest lines in the film.

Waititi’s work has always been good before, but he’s never been given this big of a canvas to paint on. Wilderpeople especially felt like they spent the majority of the movie’s budget on a climactic, over-the-top car chase full of explosions that would make Michael Bay blush. With the ability to really cut loose — and decades of Kirby and Simonson art to draw from — Waititi gives us some of the most astounding visuals of the MCU so far.

While not quite as mind-blowing as last year’s Doctor Strange, the visuals Waititi seems to be trying to give us a late 70’s/early 80’s psychedelic trip of a sci-fi movie, complete with a soundtrack by Devo’s Mark Mothersbaugh — heavy on the Devo and John Carpenter synth vibe. Oh, and a heaping helping of Led Zeppelin’s Immigrant Song in case you couldn’t get enough of it from the trailer. Waititi also borrows (steals?) visually from fellow Marvel director Sam Raimi in fun and unexpected ways and includes perhaps the most interesting nod to Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory ever.

But a film always comes down to its characters and its themes. And this is where Thor: Ragnarok perhaps shines above many of its other MCU peers. Every character in this film goes on a journey. Their stories, interactions, and dialogue are incredibly well-woven together. Everything has a purpose and eventual payoff. It sits alongside its peer Logan this year for being so well-crafted from a storytelling perspective. One tiny complaint is that it gets a little too bogged down in its own exposition in the middle. It could stand to lose five or seven minutes, but not much more.

And at the end you ask yourself, “So what?”

One of the great joys of being able to analyze movies is to ask these questions. Is this just a cashgrab to get butts in seats, buy popcorn, and sell merchandising? There’s something unique in here, which requires going into very minor spoiler territory. Skip the next 5 paragraphs if you don’t want to know any more.

[Begin Minor Spoilers]

The title Thor: Ragnarok is instructive. Ragnarok — the Norse apocalypse — is the destruction of the world, and in the case of the film and the comics, of Asgard. But it often signifies a form of creative destruction or nihilism necessary for a new chapter.

Hela comes to Thor and Loki replacing their ideas of what Asgard was — a beautiful civilization that loves peace — with the true history that she once rode with Odin making war on the 9 Realms to capture their treasure and slay millions of innocents. Odin cast her out when he decided to switch brands from bloodthirsty warmonger to benevolent father-king, but he kept the gold and trinkets that made him powerful. But after a lifetime, Odin passes onto Thor the wisdom that Asgard is not a place– it’s people. You could just as easily insert for “Asgard” there the names America, Britain, Spain . . . New Zealand.

And so here we are in 2017. Maybe we’re looking at the world with fresh eyes, that the advances of “the West” are built on a bloody history of colonialism, slavery, and other forms of oppression. Perhaps we’re now seeing the chickens of our nationalism, jingoism, sexism, and quest for economic hegemony coming home to roost in the the rise of forces and ideals we long thought dead or outmoded. Perhaps Ragnarok — some creative nihilism — is what we need to wipe the vestiges of former power away to be replaced by a more pure, benevolent rule of law.

Or maybe it’s just a story about two brothers, one of whom has a magic hammer, and it gets smashed by their mean old sister, so they have to recruit a giant green monster to help beat her up. Could be that, too.

ONE OTHER THING (Is it a spoiler to reveal what isn’t in a movie?) If you’ve got your hopes up to see the final infinity stone, just tamp those expectations down. You do get a couple glances at the Tesseract (aka the Space Stone), but we already knew about that one anyway, right? Right. Just enjoy the movie without worrying about it moving that particular storyline forward.

But, of course, make sure you stay through the credits, because. . . well, you know the drill.

[End Spoilers]

It’s likely unfair to castigate the MCU for having movies that feel like they came off an assembly line. While it may have been true previously (again, looking at you, Thor: The Dark World and Avengers: Age of Ultron), it’s worth noting how unique the Marvel Phase 3 films have been:

Captain America: Civil War is a philosophical political thriller and ethical Rorschach test with action set-pieces. (I still don’t trust anyone who is totally Team Iron Man)
Doctor Strange is a psychedelic mystic Hero’s Journey where the real enemy is ego.
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 is a family drama where a reluctant patriarch has to lose the last vestiges of his mother and father to become the father he needs to be — and where a raccoon cries at the end as he wonders whether or not there is a god.
Spider-Man: Homecoming is a John Hughes movie with superheroes.
Black Panther looks to be the most unique Marvel movie of all.

There is a theme running through all of these: the act of creative destruction. In all of these films, our characters have to give up something they love or thought defined them in order to take the next step in their hero’s journey.

Further, family looms large in Cap: Civil War, Guardians 2, and Spider-Man. Family is at the core of Thor: Ragnarok, as it’s essentially sibling rivalry writ large with intergalactic consequences. It’s almost like. . . they actually plan these things out and are trying to say something more broadly about the human condition.

Kudos, Marvel. And Kudos (or whatever the New Zealand equivalent) to Taika Waititi. You have created something unique that blends together some of the best parts of the history of the character of Thor, given us astounding visuals, great music, jokes to make us laugh, action to thrill us, and even some nuggets to ponder.

You’ve given us a film finally worthy of the God of Thunder. Go see this on the biggest, brightest screen you possibly can. And then hug your family and friends. Because even in an apocalypse, home is not just a place– it’s people.

4.5 out of 5 stars

« Older Entries