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Fashion Spotlight: Just a Hog in a Cage, Heroes Never Die, Nerf This!

Ript Apparel has three new designs! Just a Hog in a Cage, Heroes Never Die, and Nerf This!, by Obvian and BiggStankDogg are on sale today only! Get them before they’re gone!






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Tidewater Comicon 2016


Tidewater Comicon is a smaller con with quite a big bite. First of all, the location doesn’t hurt. The convention center is three miles away from a nice beach with a small boardwalk, amusement park, and all the seafood restaurants and bars your little tourist’s heart could desire. There is plenty to do when you’re not standing in line for creators or panels.

That’s correct. I didn’t have to wait in line for any panels or to meet comics creators even industry legends like Jae Lee (Inhumans, Batman/Superman) or Gerry Conway (creator of The Punisher, killed off Gwen Stacy, basically only Stan Lee and Jack Kirby have created more characters than him). I also had great seating at all the panels I attended, including the Punisher one featuring Conway and Mike Zeck (Secret Wars, the original Punisher miniseries) and a hilarious Q and A featuring actors Brian O’Halloran (Dante, various Hicks family members) and Marilyn Ghigliotti (Veronica) from Kevin Smith’s cult 1994 comedy Clerks.


The creators of Patsy Walker AKA Hellcat and me. (Picture by Katie Thompson.)

Definitely the biggest highlight of Tidewater Comicon was getting to chat with comics creators (Most of whom I’ve had various interactions with on social media.) and support their work in person. Jae Lee was as kind as he was talented and signed my copy of the recent Dynamite Django/Zorro crossover comic. His covers are examples of iconic storytelling in a single image. I geeked out way too hard over meeting the creative team of my favorite Marvel title Patsy Walker AKA Hellcat, which consists of writer Kate Leth, artist Britney Williams, and colorist Megan Wilson. I got a print of a cover of future issue featuring Jessica Jones in Alias Investigations with Hellcat on her desk and found out from Leth that editorial wanted Jessica to show up in the series, and they didn’t have to fight for her inclusion. It will be nice to see Jessica off the couch in a couple months.

I also met artist Eryk Donovan and picked up a copy of the miniseries Memetic (BOOM! Studios) that he did with James Tynion. It’s a series set during an apocalypse set off by a meme of a sloth and features a gay, deaf protagonist, who finds a little love before the world comes to a dark end. I chatted with Josh Frankel, the publisher of Z2 Comics, about their upcoming slate of titles, including Legend and Hyper Force Neo. Z2 is a fun indie publisher with a wide variety of comics from spooky, Southern fried all ages comics (Welcome to Showside) to black and white noirs (Carver) and even fantasy parodies (Allen, Son of Hellcock), and I look forward to seeing what they publish in the future. On Sunday, I got to talk with comics legend Gerry Conway about his Amazing Spider-Man run, and his fight for comics creators to get fair royalties when their creations are used in films and TV shows. I even chatted with Steve Orlando about his upcoming Supergirl series while commiserating over the loss of Midnighter. (He signed the panel where Midnighter and Apollo kiss in Midnighter #12 almost immediately after having a serious conversation with someone who wanted to break into comics.)


And while I wasn’t perusing the quarter bins or looking for manga or trade paperbacks (I picked up two volumes of Y The Last Man for $7 and picked up the complete Codename Sailor V series), a nice little oasis in the middle of the show floor was the Video Game Zone. It was basically just a bunch of tables with various sponsors, some free swag including Jurassic World Legos and Legend of Zelda soundtrack albums, and loads of video games consoles from mini arcade cabinets to Xbox One and PS4’s with the latest Mortal Kombat game or Fallout 4. I stuck to the old school playing the classic Super Mario Bros 3 on the Super NES, struggling at Marvel vs. Capcom 2 on a tricked out Sega Dreamcast, and good ol’ Frogger (which there was never a line for) while waiting for a creator interview. This area was one of the highlights of Tidewater Comicon and did a nice job integrating gamers and comics fans in one happy corner.


Welcome to Showside Live panel

On Saturday, I went to two panels: Welcome to Showside Live and the Action Lab panel because indie comics are the best. Welcome to Showside live was all about Ian McGinty‘s all ages comic Welcome to Showside about a little green monster named Kit, who wants to eat food, play video games all day, and hang out with his friends, but is actually the son of the Cthulhu-esque Shadow King. It’s a comic from Z2 comic as well as an animated pilot. Unfortunately, there were technical difficulties, and the pilot couldn’t be shown, but creator Ian McGinty, co-writer Samantha “Glow” Knapp, colorist and letterer Fred Stresing, and colorist Meg Casey put on quite an energetic panel with help of moderator Tini Howard (Poseidon IX). The team provided some great insights into the themes of the series (Basically, not being what your parents want you to be: namely evil and friends becoming a surrogate family.) as well as the process from going from a comic worked on by 3 or 4 people to a big animation project. McGinty talked about how working on licensed properties like Bravest Warriors or Adventure Time, helped him build an audience for a creator owned comic.

The Action Lab panel was pretty small and featured Action Lab publisher Bryan Seaton, writer Bob Frantz (Monty the Dinosaur), and artist/animator Sam Ellis (Archer, Bravest Warriors). Ellis is also the head of Action Lab’s relatively new animation division. Seaton laid out some of Action Lab’s summer releases, including the comics version of Nickelodeon’s Miraculous Ladybug, which is the number 1 show in France, the UK, and South Korea, and the number 3 show in the United States. Action Lab also has the license for the Miraculous Ladybug card games, which was designed by Ellis. Other comics coming up include Franco’s (Itty Bitty HellboySpot on Adventure, Sam Ellis’ Monster Dojo, and the comics adaptation of Peter David’s novel Artful, one of his rare non-Marvel comics. After announcements, Seaton, Frantz, and Ellis gave very in-depth answers to questions about the comics submission process, especially matching your comic to the company you’re pitching to. They also talked about Action Lab’s innovation in all ages comic starting with the critical acclaim of Princeless, and Seaton promised that there were more volumes of Fight Like A Girl, their mythical fight comic featuring a black teenage girl as a protagonist, coming down the line.


The Punisher panel

On Sunday, I went to a couple panels in the big panel room. The first one was about the Punisher and featured Gerry Conway and Mike Zeck. It was pretty well-attended probably due to the fantastic reception Jon Bernthal got for his performance as the character in Daredevil Season 2. Conway talked about how the Punisher was originally intended to be a one issue villain while he set up a larger storyline featuring the Jackal and Gwen Stacy in the first “Clone Saga”. The character was rooted in the 1970s when law and order was hard to come by in New York City, and the idea of vigilantism didn’t seem so bad in the wake of the real life actions of Bernard Goetz as well as the films Death Wish and Dirty Harry and Don Pendleton’s Executioner novels. Conway gave the Punisher a moral code to make him a more balanced character, and this led to him becoming a fan favorite character, who featured in Marvel’s black and white adult comics line and eventually had a miniseries and two ongoing series. Conway summed up the essence of the Punisher by saying he was a “Rorschach test for writers and artists”, who wanted to deal with the problems of their era. He said he liked a variety of takes on the Punisher from Garth Ennis’ realism in Punisher MAX to the more over the top violence of Steven Grant and Mike Zeck’s Punisher miniseries and graphic novel.


Both Conway and Zeck said that Jon Bernthal’s Punisher was their favorite on-screen version of the character and although Bernthal is a short actor, he brings presence to the role. Conway said that if they made a Punisher film in the 1970s when the character was first created that he would have cast “tough guy” actors, like Soylent Green-era Charlton Heston, Clint Eastwood, and of course, Death Wish‘s own Charles Bronson. On the artistic side, Zeck talked about his own design for the Punisher in the 1980s and said that he wanted to make him truly look like a killer while taking inspiration from Joe Kubert’s WWI and WWII-era German anti-hero Enemy Ace. Zeck also said that the Punisher was ripe to become a breakout character in the 1980s with the popularity of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone’s ultraviolent action films.

Conway and Zeck also talked a little about other characters they have worked on in response to fan questions with Zeck saying his dream character to work on for Marvel was Captain America, and he was happy that the character had a main role in the original Secret Wars. Conway said he was a big fan of Spider-Gwen and was glad he got the opportunity to write a story featuring her in Spider-Verse Team-Up saying that her new role as a superhero was much more fleshed out than the “nice girl” that she was back in Amazing Spider-Man in the 1960s and 1970s. He talked about enjoying the creative freedom of writing B and C list characters, like his current work on Marvel’s Carnage. Gerry Conway and Mike Zeck provided some great insights into these iconic characters drawing on their decades of work in the industry. (Conway sold his first story to DC Comics as a 16 year old!)


Brian O’Halloran did want to be here at the Clerks panel.

The final panel I went to was a Q and A with Brian O’Halloran and Marilyn Ghigliotti. O’Halloran played Dante in the cult comedy Clerks, directed by Kevin Smith, and has played various Hicks family members in virtually every Kevin Smith film set in his cinematic universe, the View Askewniverse. Ghigliotti played Dante’s girlfriend Veronica in Clerks (Of the “37 dicks” and lasagna fame) and now works in the film industry as a makeup artist. She will be reprising the role of Veronica in the upcoming Clerks III film. O’Halloran and Ghigliotti told wildly hilarious stories about working on Kevin Smith’s films and meeting various celebrities, like Mark Hamill, George Carlin, and Alan Rickman, who gave O’Halloran some advice when he flubbed a line in Dogma. O’Halloran showed up off his Dante-esque nerd cred and gave his opinion on Star Wars: The Force Awakens, including roasting the Starkiller base while saying that Lord of the Rings and Star Wars are equally good trilogies in a riff off some dialogue from Clerks II. Brian O’Halloran is a naturally funny person, and it was easy to see from his personality why he is such a good fit for Kevin Smith’s style of writing and filmmaking. The crowd was very animated, and it showed how Smith’s films and his down to Earth, slightly nerdy protagonists have resonated with fans even 22 years after Clerks was released.

Tidewater Comicon was a nice, relaxing convention that covered a wide gamut of fandom from anime voice actors to cult comedy actors, big time Marvel and DC artists, and indie comics darlings. One slight critique was that exhibitors mostly sold single issues and not trade paperbacks, but Tidewater Comicon is a great palate cleanser after going to huge, crowded shows like New York Comic Con.

Be on the look out for my upcoming articles about Tidewater Comicon cosplayers and interviews with comics creators Tini Howard (Skeptics) and Ian McGinty (Welcome to Showside).

Video Game Review: Bloodborne DLC: The Old Hunters (PS4)

BB-The-Old-Hunters_Key-Art.0It takes a certain kind of individual to really get into the Dark Souls series. One needs determination, fortitude, and lots of free time (I’m pretty sure a fetish for bondage also helps too because it hurts so goooood…). When From Software debuted their grim series with Demon Souls back in 2009, it paved the way for a whole new style of games I like to call “torture games.” There were plenty of times where I was ready to throw the controller at the wall and smash my Playstation 3 with a sledgehammer, but persistence paid off in the end! (I wonder what that says about my personality after my intro…)

So let’s fast forward to 2015 with From Software’s latest installment in their torture game series with their spin off game Bloodborne. While only really taking the “Souls” of the series and replacing it with blood, From Software delivered an amazing title that really lived up to the series (especially considering how lackluster Dark Souls 2 felt). The game is smooth, the graphics are stunning and the bosses are hard as #$%@! While the game didn’t particularly feel all that long (especially because I burned through it in about 6 days or so), the amount of content packed into the game was very satisfying. So naturally, being addicted to pain and punishment (along with the Dark Souls series), I had to try out the DLC for Bloodborne titled Bloodborne: The Old Hunters.

One of the things I really enjoyed and hated about Bloodborne was the weapons. While it was awesome that every weapon essentially had two forms with the trick weapon system, the amount of weapons in the game itself were far less than the Dark Souls series. So seeing that From Soft added a lot more weapons into the game with the DLC made me feel like a kid in a candy store with $100 to spend in the 1950’s. The developers added nearly as many weapons as the initial game had for players, so naturally it was greatly appreciated. One of the things I really love about Bloodborne is that the weapons all feel incredibly different and each DLC weapon is amazing! (Especially the Whirligig Saw!)

Like all Dark Souls titles, the difficulty increases based on how many times you’ve cleared the game’s final boss, and the DLC content is nothing to laugh at the first time around. While some people may have started over from scratch to reach the DLC, I’m pretty sure most people don’t want to toss away their blood, sweat, and tears and just rolled through the game on New Game Plus or beyond (because that’s exactly what I did!). The bosses in the DLC beyond a first playthrough are ridiculously hard to the point that rage is almost certain (I’m not going to lie, there were many times where breaking my TV sounded like a good idea). While there are only 4 mega bosses in the DLC story, getting to them on your first playthrough is no easy feat, making the game take quite some time to get through (unless you’ve taken a few days off to solely dedicate to it like I did).

One of the things I greatly enjoy about the Souls series is that From Soft really strives to provide players with a game that’s not only got an amazing plot, but is so rich with lore that you have to hunt down yourself. With nothing more than cryptic messages in items, players must look inside every nook and cranny in order to appease their knowledge. With the main story taking place within a dream, the DLC itself actually takes you into another dream that’s just as twisted and demented as the main world’s game, with a heavy focus on the Hunters instead of just monsters. The developers added more items to hunt down that compliment the original story, answering more questions that the original story left out.

So with smooth gameplay, fun dungeons, difficult boss fights, and a lot pain ahead of you with this DLC, I guess we come down to the big question of price and whether or not it’s worth it. With $20 on the line, it would be natural to question the value of this purchase. Being that I’m a rather big Dark Souls/Bloodborne fan, I’d say yes, I think the DLC is definitely worth it. Getting any extra bit of content in games feels like a massive bonus and feels pretty essential for any fan of the series.

Any questions on the DLC? Are you loving it as much as I am? Not a fan of the Souls series? Haven’t tried it yet? Love torture? Give Bloodborne a try and see for yourself if you’ve got an inner masochist! Thanks for reading!

Gameplay: 10 Story: 9 Graphics: 9 Overall Score: 9.5

Video Game Review: Dissidia: Final Fantasy ( Japan Arcade)

Thank you Internet for this amazing photo

Thank you Internet for this amazing photo

While exploring the Land of the Rising Sun, I was also present for the release of Square Enix‘s latest installment in their fighting game series- Dissidia: Final Fantasy. Debuting for fans and owners of a PSP (which was probably only around 500 people worldwide), Square Enix made a game that allowed players with pit their favorite iconic Final Fantasy heroes (which for 90% of fans was probably Cloud Strife) against other heroes and villains (once again probably Cloud Strife or Sephiroth) in this 3D RPG Fighter series. Being a fan of the original game, I was pretty excited to try out the arcade version when it debut on Thanksgiving (Because Japanese people don’t have Turkey!). If only the pilgrims had video games 500 years ago…

One of the big things I really enjoyed about Dissidia was the fact that it wasn’t your conventional fighting game. Square Enix tried their best to bring players as original of a title as possible by transcending the second dimension and I personally think it was a smart move. While people learned tips and tricks to bring up their technical game, the game itself was unique enough to keep my attention, which is all I really want in a fighting game. It seemed to do well enough because it spawned a sequel (or prequel if you paid attention to that lousy story.), which in my opinion was much better than the first game.

One of my biggest concerns with Dissidia was the fact that Square Enix never officially released this title onto home consoles, which would have been a brilliant move. Playing an intense fighting game on a handheld definitely didn’t bring the best experience possible. So while the series was good, I felt it wasn’t brought to its fullest potential. So fast forward about 6 years to 2015, where Square Enix decided to deliver fans a new experience by throwing Dissidia into their various arcades.

The game itself seems very familiar to the previous installments. Players control their character in a 3D environment in order to attack their opponents, either from up-close or from a distance depending on the character used. The biggest change to the actual game is the fact that instead of a single player battle, players are now grouped into teams of 3 to battle other teams. You’re forced to work together with your comrades in order to take down the opposing team, with the objective to kill every other member at least once to end the match (Or for some, ganging up on the weakest link).

Adding the 3 on 3 multiplayer battles gives players the ability to coordinate with their teammates to really give the game more a co-op competitive edge. The arcade system actually has a port for a headset so you can keep in contact with your allies while in battle to plan out strategies. With a scheduled port coming out to the PS4 at a future date, this would definitely be a great way to utilize the PS4’s microphone and headset function.

The ability to use the summons was also drastically changed in this installment, as instead of simply manipulating the attack power of characters or “Brave Points,” the summons actually come into battle to wreak havoc to the enemy. And it looks amazing.

Like in the original titles, the characters have completely different styles they focus on. The characters could vary anywhere from heavy melee types (Everyone’s favorite overcompensating blonde) to casters, which gave players a massive variety. No character is the same as another. Unfortunately one of the major drawbacks I had with the title was that there are only heroes playable in this installment. While they added a character from the 14th installment in the franchise, that only gave the roster 14 playable characters, a significant drop from the handheld titles, which usually paired up a villain with a hero.

The controller was another huge drawback to the game as Square Enix essentially cut a playstation controller in half and mounted it to each side of the panel to resemble joysticks with a big button in the middle you had to press in order to build up your summon gauge. The summon gauge button was probably the worst part about it, because to use it you have to take your hand off one of the controllers, which usually meant you were completely open to an enemy attack…

Why they couldn't simply add an extra button on the controller is beyond me...

Why they couldn’t simply add an extra button on the controller is beyond me…

One of the things I really enjoyed was the fact that there was no overly convoluted plot that you got swept up in with this game. Being an arcade title, Square Enix solely wants players to duke it out, and this decision is welcomed. While some might think a crossover is fun, I never cared much for the plot.

Being that this wasn’t on a handheld console, the graphics underwent a massive upgrade moving onto a bigger and better system. Characters not only look fully rendered, but the amount of detail that went into everything was incredible (we all know Square Enix loves their pretty graphics in a Final Fantasy game). Players have alterations on their outfits based on the amount of damage they’ve taken, making them look more battered and bruised the more you go on.

All in all, while the game was enjoyable and the new additions to game were great, I felt like it was very incomplete compared to the handheld titles that came out years ago. I’m hoping that the home console version improves on these functions as well as adds more characters for fans to play with. 14 just doesn’t quite seem like enough. It’s got potential that has yet to be tapped into, and while I look forward to seeing more, knowing Square Enix, it’ll probably be in the form of expensive DLC. (Yay…?)

Any thoughts or questions about this title? Feel free to leave a comment below and thanks for reading!

Gameplay: 7 Graphics: 9 Story: – Characters: 5 Overall: 6.5

Video Game Review: Pokken Tournament (Japan Arcade)

Look at this smug guy. He was a pushover in the anime with all the skirt chasing, but he knew the outcome of the video game match in Yellow Version...

Look at this smug guy. He was a pushover in the anime with all the skirt chasing, but he knew the outcome of the video game match in Yellow Version…

It’s no secret that after watching the Pokemon anime, kids around the world were wishing for a game that really simulated what we saw in the 90’s (Heck I wish I could have a game like that now!). People desperately wanted to know how exactly a Pikachu could beat an Onix. Because he was next to garbage in the Gameboy games when fighting Brock.

So when I heard that Bandai Namco Entertainment was in the works with Nintendo to make a fighting game, you can imagine my anticipation over a whole new way to play Pokemon. (We all know that if there was a Pokemon MMORRPG, that’d signify the end of the world. Nintendo is just sparing us the pain right now.)

So on my trip to the Land of the Rising Sun, I had to try Pokken Tournament out, because how could I not? So after running around through Tokyo like an otaku in a hobby shop, I went over to one of the many arcades to try the game out. While there was a bit of a language barrier, that didn’t stop this fan from getting on the game and button mashing my way to victory!

The game itself is pretty much like a hybrid of Smash Bros. and Tekken in terms of controls. You have a 3D arena you can run around in and the maps are decently sized too, giving players enough room to bait their opponents if need be. The controls are pretty basic too. You have a light combo button, a heavy attack, a special button that lets you use all their powers, a jump button, and a block button in order to withstand your enemy’s attacks. Like Tekken, the fighting mechanics are pretty smooth with plenty of options to take down your opponent with all kinds of strategies.

The characters, while not many, have quite a different range of skill sets and play styles to give players a lot of options for fighting. You’ve got speed types, heavy hitters, combo oriented and technical characters that all have their balances to keep some from being too overpowered. Like Smash Bros, any character is heavily player dependent, so while some appear to have more of an edge, with a little practice, anyone can get good with whoever they choose (With the exception of Gengar. That’s pure cheating all around…).

This guy is pure evil and he knows it!

This guy is pure evil and he knows it!

Players build up a gauge through their matches that can allow them to enter their character’s special stance. For some it’s a mega-evolution that was introduced with Generation VI’s era, while other Pokemon simply enter a more powerful mode with an aura. This also allows you to activate their ultimate attack that enters a cinematic if players are able to hit their opponents with it.

Pokken Tournament also features a support character function that allows you to pick a Pokemon from a list to use a single time per round to help you against your opponent. This can vary from a stun, to an extra hit that can allow you to chain more combos you couldn’t normally do without more time. These supports can easily turn around a match in your favor, so using them with caution is key!

I’ve never been the type to really care for stories in my fighting game and probably won’t ever, because who plays these for the story? So, having a language barrier didn’t really bother me, as I play a fighting game for one thing and one thing only- the action!

The graphics were pretty amazing for this title. Anyone can see that a lot of detail was put into the game, as even the hair textures for the furrier Pokemon are visible. I do enjoy nice graphics to compliment smooth gameplay!

Seeing the videos on YouTube for quite some time now, I came in having some decent expectations of the title. Unfortunately, while the game seemed very impressive, I didn’t find it as enjoyable as I hoped. The lack of a large roster really hurt the game’s performance for me, despite the wide array of styles. When it comes to fighting games, I like having options for playable characters. One of the other things that really bothered me was the fact that despite this game being an arcade title, players had to use a controller to play.

I honestly felt like an arcade joystick/button combo would be been better.

I honestly feel like an arcade joystick/button combo would be been a better choice.

I read a review that stated this title wasn’t generating a huge amount of buzz despite the initial hype, and seeing the machines generally unused while I was there proved to me that this was true. While the game is entertaining and has potential, I feel like it’ll definitely be better suited for it’s home console release later next year. Giving fans the ability to play this title at home, Nintendo can play this out like the latest installment for Smash Bros. and simply add more characters through DLC.

All in all, while the game wasn’t necessarily the highlight of my video game experience, I’m definitely glad I tried it out and would recommend it to anyone who is interested. I have a feeling that despite the arcade’s lack of popularity, the home console version of this game is going to be even better. Especially with the options to play with your friends.

Pokken Tournament debuted in Japan’s arcades July 16th and it’s scheduled to release for the home console March 18, 2016 for Japan, and Q2 on the Wii U.

Any questions or comments about the game? Please feel free to leave your thoughts below and thanks for reading!

Gameplay: 7 Graphics: 8 Story: N/A Characters: 5 Overall: 7

Epic Games Reveals its MOBA Paragon with First Details and Trailer

Epic Games took to the stage at PlayStation Experience today to reveal the first details for its upcoming MOBA, Paragon, which will be coming to PC and PlayStation 4 in 2016.

Paragon is the MOBA from Epic Games that puts you in the fight with explosive action, direct third-person control, and deep strategic choice. Choose from an ever-expanding roster of unique Heroes, earn cards to customize their abilities, and lead your team to victory.

Epic revealed an announce trailer for the game today, as well. Captured entirely in Unreal Engine 4, the trailer shows off a few of the game’s Heroes in action, and delivers the intensity of Paragon’s gameplay.

Check out the trailer:

You can get an early look at the game in action with a gameplay video: 

Paragon is coming to PC and PlayStation 4, with paid Early Access in Spring 2016 and Open Beta in Summer 2016.

You can sign up for the beta now.

Check out some screen shots.

The Walking Dead: Michonne Reveal Trailer

A stand-alone three episode event, The Walking Dead: Michonne further bridges together the Telltale game series with the canon of Robert Kirkman‘s comic through one of its most complex characters.

The story explores Michonne, portrayed by award-winning actress Samira Wiley (Orange is the New Black), on an untold journey during the time between issues #126 and #139. Haunted by her past, players will discover what took her away from Rick, Ezekiel, and the rest of her trusted group… and what brought her back.

The Walking Dead: Michonne – A Telltale Games Series will be available this February to download on PC, Mac, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, compatible iOS devices, and Android.

Batman Gets a Video Game Courtesy of Telltale

Telltale Games has knocked it out of the park with their video game adaptations of comic book series The Walking Dead and Fables. Now, they’re taking on an even more iconic comic book character.

At the Game Awards which aired yesterday, a teaser ran featuring Gothamites and the news debating the virtues of Bruce Wayne and Batman.

The Batman episodic game series will premiere digitally on home consoles, PC/Mac, and mobile devices and debut in 2016. Specific platform details are yet to be announced.

Neverwinter: Underdark Expansion Launches on PC

NW_Underdark_Box_Art_WatermarkedPerfect World Entertainment Inc. and Cryptic Studios have launched Neverwinter: Underdark – the eighth expansion of the action MMORPG set in the Dungeons & Dragons’ Forgotten Realmsuniverse from Wizards of the Coast – on PC, with Xbox One to follow in early 2016. Join forces with Drizzt Do’Urden and his companions summoned to battle demonic forces erupting from the Underdark, including an all-new 10-player encounter against the Prince of Demons, Demogorgon.

When a spell turns against the Archmage of Menzoberranzan, powerful demons spill into the Underdark, beginning a series of events that coincide with the Rage of Demons storyline from Wizards of the Coast. Neverwinter: Underdark lets players jump into that story to battle these demons and send them back to the Abyss. Full of new content and quality-of-life updates, this expansion continues to improve the constantly-evolving MMORPG. The full list of additions includes:

  • 10-player encounter with the two-headed demon lord, Demogorgon
  • Adventure alongside iconic Dungeons & Dragons characters including Drizzt Do’Urden, Bruenor Battlehammer and Regis in a new questline, “The Dwarven King”, written by New York Times Best-Selling Author R.A. Salvatore
  • All-new campaign including new in-game rewards inspired by the Rage of Demons storyline from Wizards of the Coast
  • Mantol-Derith, a new non-combat adventurer hub found in the Underdark
  • Two new end-game skirmishes, each with two different ways to achieve victory
  • Rifts in the Abyssal plane now summon Demonic encounters throughout the Sword Coast adding variety to open-world Heroic Encounters
  • Updates to the Trade Bar Store allowing easier access to items and economy adjustments
  • Gear Preview allows players to see how all equippable items will look on their characters
  • Additional Strongholds content including a new resource plot and PvP tower
  • Artifact weapons can be reforged into new artifact weapons via double refinement above rank 15
  • Masterwork Items now obtainable from endgame Professions tasks
  • Boons tied to successfully quelling demonic presence in the Underdark campaign

Neverwinter is a free-to-play action MMORPG that features fast-paced combat and epic dungeons. Players explore the vast city of Neverwinter and its surrounding countryside, learning the vivid history of the iconic city in the Forgotten Realms and battling its many enemies. Neverwinter is currently available on PC and digitally for Xbox One, available free-to-play with Gold (Gold membership [sold separately] required) from the Xbox Games Store.

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are folk excited for? We’ve got lots of reviews lined up!

While you await all of that, here’s some news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

GamePolitics – First shot of Stardock’s next presidential election simulation game – I don’t think any game can cover this election’s insanity.

ICv2 – Dark Horse Adapting Top Chinese Graphic Novels – This could be cool.

iO9 – Supergirl Has a Superman-Sized Problem at its Center – Yup, definitely an issue.

GamePolitics – SPJ reveals ‘Bill Kunkel Awards’ to honor ethical games journalism – This is great to see.


Around the Tubes Reviews

Talking Comics – James Bond #1

CBR – Silver Vol. 1

Talking Comics – The Vision #1

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