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Review: Bloodshot #11

Bloodshot #11

Bloodshot #11 sees the villain Rampage explain everything that happened since 2018’s Bloodshot Salvation series. He had lost his ability to access his nanites but upon stumbling upon a political rally and feeling that he needed God’s help, he’s struck by lightning and the nanites were back under his control. This issue also sees Bloodshot, KT and Wiggins infiltrate an underwater server farm where they’re attacked by a cybernetic villain. Rampage, who is now calling himself Harmony, stepped up his game and took control of Bloodshot’s comrades and had them attack him.

I thought the art was the stronger aspect of Bloodshot #11 and I really like the style of Pedro Andreo. He’s got a good amount of detail mixed with what feels like a bit of a manga twist. I thought Coupled with colors by Andrew Dalhouse, the pages inside Bloodshot look pretty great. This issue had a few action sequences that visually, really stood out. Dave Sharpe‘s lettering is always on-point.

The story was alright. Rampage, explaining his story to someone off-panel, felt rushed. And while most of the Bloodshot material felt like it flowed at a standard pace, once Rampage showed up to take control, it again had a weird pace, like something was amiss. That said, I have really enjoyed KT and Wigins, who originally appeared in 2020’s Bloodshot movie. I do think Bloodshot benefits from having a supporting cast. Also, Tim Seeley has done a superb job of injecting a small bit of humor into Bloodshot’s personality, making him more than just an emotionless gun.

There’s just one issue left of this run of Bloodshot. I’m hoping for a big fight between Bloodshot and Rampage, although I had those same hopes when Salvation was ending, only to not get it. That said, Bloodshot #11 has something really cool going on with the art, although the story needs just a bit of work.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXology – Kindle – Zeus Comics – TFAW

Underrated: Eternal Warrior: Sword of the Wild

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Eternal Warrior: Sword of the Wild


It should be no secret to you that I am a huge fan of Valiant comics. I’ve also made no secret of my love for the Eternal Warrior. But a lot of that love stems from Book Of Death and Wrath of the Eternal Warrior, and not his first solo series offered since Valiant’s 2012 relaunch, the eponymously titled Eternal Warrior. I first read that series shortly after Book Of Death and didn’t enjoy it as much as I wanted to, and although I’ve heard mixed opinions on it since, I wanted to give the first four issues in the series another chance (you can find them collected as Sword Of The Wild, hence the full title of this week’s column, and what I’ll be referring to them as going forward).

The back of the trade dressing (apparently) reads;

Soldier. Guardian. Warrior. Legend. Across ten millennia and a thousand battlefields, Gilad Anni-Padda has traversed the darkest, most mysterious corners of history. But the horror and bloodshed of constant warfare has finally taken its toll on the man myth calls the Eternal Warrior…and he has abdicated his duties as the Fist and the Steel of Earth for a quiet life of seclusion. But when a blood vendetta from the distant past suddenly reappears in the modern day, he must decide if he will return to the ways of war…for the child who betrayed him thousands of years ago…

Before rereading Sword of the Wild I realised that I had to look at the book as its own entity, removed from the larger continuity of the Valiant universe as a whole. This realisation came because for me Sword of the Wild doesn’t tie in to the portrayal of the Eternal Warrior we were given in Unity, and subsequently Book Of Death and Wrath of the Eternal Warrior (although the latter two came after Sword of the Wild) nor the general continuity Valiant had built at the time. Once I had taken that mentality with the book,  I sat down, opened the front cover and got started… and was immediately transported to what felt like a reimagination of the 90’s era Eternal Warrior.

I say this because although the book doesn’t lot in as well with the Valiant continuity as other books and series have done, it’s still a really enjoyable read. More so than I initially expected. When you look at this book as a standlone story about an immortal warrior finally having enough of the world’s shit and just wants to live the rest of his long days in peace (or at least a portion of them), and remove any preconcieved notions of how it could or should fit into the other stories featuring Gilad Anni-Padda, then you’ll find that there’s a really compelling four issue arc here.

Just on that maybe lines up better with the pre-relaunch Valiant comics than the Valiant Entertainment era.

I really enjoyed this book – far more than I expected to. So why is it today’s subject? Because I hear very few people talk about this volume with the enthusiasm the character deserves because it doesn’t fit the larger Valiant continuity as well as it could. But as a standalone story? It’s pretty good – that’s why the book is Underrated.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Review: Bloodshot #11

Bloodshot #11

With the second chapter of The Last Shot, Bloodshot #11 we’re reintroduced to Rampage as Bloodshot and his team try to shut down another nefarious plot from Project Rising Spirit (I didn’t paste that from the preview text, because it was really brief, and I wanted to use the word nefarious).

When it comes to the content and feel of this issue, and indeed the arc itself, I’d be willing to put money on the fact that One Last Shot was originally set to come out a lot closer to the release of the 2020 Bloodshot movie, as the arc feels in some ways as a pseudo sequel to the Vin Diesel movie told through the eyes of the Valiant comic universe. But with the delays caused by Covid 19 and the effective shutdown of the comics industry for a few months (not to mention Valiant’s still-reduced publishing schedule), things haven’t worked out that way.

Writer Tim Seeley takes what worked from the movie (the interplay between Bloodshot, Wiggins and KT) and weaves it into the comics landscape, bringing elements of Lemire’s run in with references back to specific issues. Honestly, it’s refreshing to see that Seeley is taking this approach – one of Valiant’s strengths has always been its universe’s connected continuity, and while at times that can wane a little, Seeley with Bloodshot has found a balance that allows his unique voice to shine without erasing what came before.

There’s a lot of hacking in Bloodshot #11 in one form or another, and that kinda suits a comic about a superhero running on machines, but it also gives Bloodshot and his team a guerilla warfare feel as they take on a much larger and arguably more powerful opponent in Project Rising Spirit (who are almost comically evil at this point).

Pedro Andreo‘s art in the opening pages is really good. Seeley updates us on where Rampage has been since we last saw him, and Andreo’s art helps those few pages deliver a lot more information via visual cues than you’d expect from three pages (this was another book where I had thought that the comic was finished at the mid point – Seeley isn’t afraid to pack the book with content). Bloodshot #11 showcases Andreo’s story telling versatility and willingness to play with the traditional panels and borders, though his tendency to have characters break the confines of the panel is used well for the most part, the cohesion is lost a little toward the end of the comic as the backgrounds tend to be less detailed in what I think is an effort increase the pace of the story – I understand the choice, but the speed increase did leave me a touch lost (though I freely admit this could also be because I got distracted watching hockey while reading the comic for a few minutes).

Seeley abd Andreo are joined by colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe, who add some visual flair to the comic; Dalhouse keeps to a colour palette that emphasizes the shadowy conflicts within the book, and Sharpe adds some panache to the panels with the sound effects popping from the page (I often find that letters get the short end of the stick far too often – when they do their job well you don’t notice because it’s seamless, but you can notice when they don’t do their job well).

Bloodshot #11, the penultimate chapter in the current arc before the series goes on hiatus, is another enjoyable book that gives fans what they’ve come to expect from Seeley’s run with the character; a fun, fast paced story that never quite gives you time to breathe (until it does). Honestly, this isn’t my favorite Bloodshot story, but I’m still really enjoying it all the same.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.3 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

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Preview: Bloodshot #11

BLOODSHOT #11

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by PEDRO ANDREO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by ADELSO CORONA, ANDREW DALHOUSE
Cover B by LEONARDO MANCO
Preorder Variant Cover by BRENT PEEPLES
On Sale February 24th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

“One Last Shot” fires away as Bloodshot and his crew hunt down the resurrected Project Rising Spirit!

Bestselling writer Tim Seeley and rising star Pedro Andreo push the one-man army to a pulse-pounding point of no return.

BLOODSHOT #11

Review: Savage #1

Savage #1

Teenage heartthrob. Feral social icon. Dinosaur hunter? Raised on an uncharted island full of prehistoric dangers, Kevin Sauvage has a taste of home when a mutant dino threat invades England! He’s back in Savage #1.

One of the first things I noticed about Savage #1, and it’s an easily overlooked detail honestly, was the layout of the opening page by Travis Escarfullery, the Director of Design & Production for Valiant. The recap/introduction page is designed to look like a social media feed but it was the legal jargon included as a part of the page design rather than as a lined-off segment underneath the comic’s introduction. It was subtle, and probably not something that a lot of people will notice, but it’s an immersive touch right from the get go that shows how Kevin Sauvage’s life has changed since we saw him land in London four years ago. As you’d expect, less time has passed for Kevin than for us, but in the intervening weeks and months, he’s become a media darling because of his experiences.

Savage #1, written by Max Bemis, has a different feel to it than the original miniseries – which is to be expected given the character is no longer on the time-displaced island he grew up on – as we see Kevin attempt to adjust to his new situation. Although there’s the obvious fish-out-of-water scenario here, Bemis avoids the initial introduction by skipping ahead which I think works in the story’s favour as the character’s first steps on the adjustment from Savage to Kevin Sauvage isn’t the specific focus of the comic, allowing Bemis to instead focus on the character’s new sense of isolation and discomfort as he navigates the civilized world. It’s a lot like the Tarzan books after he returns from the jungle rather than as he returns; never comfortable with civilization, but somewhat used to it.

Nathan Stockman‘s art is a far cry from the style of Lewis Larosa and Clayton Henry, the artists who worked on the original miniseries, but no less enjoyable. While his inks are heavier, his style is well suited to the confines of London rather than the freedom of the island – whether intentional or not. The violence and energy in the opening pages is stunted as we switch to London, but Stockman keeps it interesting by playing with his layouts until the island is seen again (this may sound like a bad thing given my choice of words, but I’m actually impressed how mundane the city scenes feel after the opening pages without ever feeling boring). Savage #1 is a book that’s grown on me from my first reading in black and white several months ago, and part of that is how Trionna Farrell brings the book to life with the colouring.

The first time I read Savage #1, while I enjoyed it, it was far from a comic I was looking forward to going back to – but having done so (twice now), Bemis’ story is growing on me and I have a genuine appreciation for how Stockman and Farrell are working together – over the course of three readings, I’ve found myself upping the final score by a solid point and change. Savage #1 may not be the best comic you’ll read, but there’s something glorious about a man fighting dinosaurs with a little knife that just has me grinning from ear to ear. It’s a bloody comic at times, and I love it.

Story: Max Bemis Art: Nathan Stockman
Colours: Trionna Farrell Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.4 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Kindle – Zeus Comics – TFAW

Exclusive: Valiant’s The Visitor Returns in June for its Final Two Issues

The Visitor will return with two issues in June. Valiant has revealed The Visitor #5 and #6 will both be released in June. Written by Paul Levitz, the series was delayed due to COVID but it’s back on track and wraps up with its final two issues.

Check out the final two issues including the reveal of their covers!

THE VISITOR #5 (OF 6)

Written by PAUL LEVITZ
Art by SOO LEE
Cover A by AMILCAR PINNA
Cover B by CASPAR WIJNGAARD
ON SALE JUNE 2

• With just two of The Visitor’s targets left standing, what extreme lengths will he go to in order to finish the job?
• Nothing is truly as it seems…

THE VISITOR #6 (OF 6)

Written by PAUL LEVITZ
Art by MJ KIM
Cover A by AMILCAR PINNA
Cover B by ALAN QUAH
ON SALE. JUNE 16

• The Visitor pulls the trigger on tomorrow once and for all in the epic finale!
• With all answers revealed, whose path into the future is the one that should be taken?

Review: Savage #1

Savage #1

For those not keeping up on Valiant Entertainment’s books, seeing a character like Savage might be a bit of a confusing thing. Many readers of the 90s were familiar with when then-Valiant had the Turok license and paired him with some of their big guns and even gave him his own ongoing. Those days are gone and Turok is doing just about nothing of note but Savage #1 is picking right up as Valiant’s newest dinosaur hunter series.

If you didn’t read the mini-series that spawned Savage, a bit of a recap: a world-famous soccer player and his pregnant wife disappear while in flight. They land on a strange island populated with dinosaurs. The wife gives birth but the child is more-or-less raised in a wild, violent environment known as the Faraway, where time bends back on itself and all manner of creature roam. After a big throwdown with the human scum of the island, Savage is portaled to current day England.

Savage #1 is the newest mini-series and sees what’s happened to Savage since he just showed up. He’s a teen sensation thrust into the limelight – limelight he may not necessarily want. In short time, dinosaurs and other creatures are let loose and Savage does what he does best – he goes to war with them, only to be captured by those that set them free in the first place.

I was really skeptical of this first issue. I think the first Savage series was pretty good and it honed something that a lot of us fans of Valiant thought was missing. I was a huge Turok fan and while he’s not Turok, he’s an awesome equivalent to what we once had. But when the writer of that previous mini, B. Clay Moore, was not returning, nor were the art team of Lewis Larosa and Clayton Henry, it just felt like nothing about a new Savage series would be anywhere near entertaining. I can say that I’m a bit wrong in that regard.

I’m only familiar with Max Bemis from when he was writing Moon Knight for Marvel, which I enjoyed. Here, he takes a fish out of water story and puts him back into something primordial. I don’t want to give away too much but this was a bloodbath of a book, action-packed and overall, really awesome. It reminds me that Valiant can have a character like this again, one that’s got a familiar presence while at the same time, being a newer character free of years of continuity.

Nathan Stockman, Triona Farrell, and Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou aren’t going to stack up to Larosa and Henry but that’s okay. Really, any book with dinos should be done by Larosa. It’s a rule. But on a serious note, the art team opens with a rad fight scene and closes with some rather creative fighting. From a visual standpoint, this issue is as action-packed as any previous issue of Savage. While I would prefer a bit more detail, I really can’t complain about the art. The visuals are wild.

Savage #1 ends up as the blood-and-guts battle royale book that I desperately needed. I’m glad that this is finally seeing the light of day, as I am sure this was probably supposed to have been released last year and should have finished by now. And for older Valiant fans, it’s okay to like this. Turok will never return to Valiant and with a character as wild as Savage, they’d never need him back in the first place.

Story: Max Bemis Art: Nathan Stockman
Colorist: Triona Farrell Letterer: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou
Story: 9.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

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