Tag Archives: upper deck

Exclusive Joe Jusko Marvel Spider-Man Print from Upper Deck at San Diego Comic-Con

Upper Deck has announced a last-minute, never-before-seen Comic-Con exclusive print from famed Marvel comic artist Joe Jusko. As Spider-Man remains among the highest grossing superhero titles of all time, this limited-edition print featuring Spiderman swinging through New York City is a must-have!

The print, featuring a facsimile autograph by Jusko, will be unveiled for the first time this Wednesday at Upper Deck Booth #307. It is limited to just 100 prints, which are available for purchase at the show.

In addition, Upper Deck will host free signings on Friday and Saturday with leading artists; including Crystal Graziano, John Stanko, Dave Dorman, Bryan Tillman and Eric Wilkerson. At the booth, Upper Deck will showcase its complete Gallery Collection, with prints from entertainment properties such as Marvel and more. All merchandise is available for attendees to purchase right off the show floor.

The Fantastic Four Returns…. to Marvel Legendary from Upper Deck

For years now there’s been persistent rumors there’s been a ban/lower prioritization of the Fantastic Four and X-Men from Marvel due to their movie ownership at Fox. No actual evidence has been presented, just conspiratorial connect the dots that ignore the creation of new X-Men characters, the licensed material that does get released, and use of some of the Fantastic Four characters in the comics themselves. While it is clear “something” was up, exactly what isn’t beyond a “deemphasis.”

Part of the fuel to the fire was the discontinuation of the Marvel Legendary: Fantastic Four expansion by Upper Deck for their popular deck-building game.

As reported by ICv2, Upper Deck Senior Brand Manager Jason Brenner has said that the “company has been authorized to immediately go back to press on a new printing of the product, which will be available in six to eight weeks.”

The expansion was originally released in the fourth quarter of 2013 and went out of print due to a “licensor-controlled issue.” This out of print status has led the expansion to be covetted and the aftermarket price to incease over 10x. Originally retailing for $19.99, expansions are being sold for over $300.

Three out of the four of the Fantastic Four appeared in the first Dice Masters set, Avengers vs. X-Men by WizKids released in 2014. They haven’t appeared in the game since. The Thing was one of the releases for Knight Models’ Marvel Universe Miniature Game and was released last year.

Can the team’s return to comics be far behind?

Around the Tubes

the_clone_conspiracy__4It was new comic book day yesterday. What’d folks get? What’d you enjoy? What didn’t you enjoy? Sound off in the comments!

While you decide on that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

The Beat – A year of free comics: Letters To An Absent Father by Maré Odomo – it’s not what you think! – Free comics, go read it!

ICv2 – Upper Deck Launching OP Kits for ‘Marvel: Legendary’ – This is pretty cool.

The Beat – Editor Ellie Pyle ankles Vertigo for Riot Games – An interesting change. Congrats!

The Comichron – Average comic book ordered in 2016 cost $3.85, down 11 cents – Savings!

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Newsarama – The Clone Conspiracy #4

Newsarama – Green Arrow #15

The Beat – It’s Me

Comic Vine – Monsters Unleashed #1

SDCC 2016: Upper Deck Gallery Announces Two Exclusive Marvel Posters

Upper Deck Gallery limited-edition posters of Elektra ($100.00) and Marvel in Hall H ($85.00) will be available throughout San Diego Comic-Con at the Upper Deck booth #307 in Hall A! Nei Ruffino the artist who created the Elektra poster will be on-hand to sign copies for those who purchase them on Saturday from 1:00-2:00 p.m. as well as free 5×7 copies of her art.

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Upper Deck Releases Legendary Encounters: A Predator Deck Building Game

Upper-Deck-Legendary-Deck-Building-Game-Encounters-PredatorUpper Deck and Twentieth Century Fox Consumer Products have officially released Legendary Encounters: A Predator Deck Building Game, which is sure to become an instant hit with both Predator fans and gamers around the world.

This new release brings an exciting and unique element of gameplay to the popular Legendary Deck Building games, allowing players to choose a fully cooperative mode or fully competitive mode of play. In cooperative mode, players take on the role of the Humans and work together to complete objectives, stay alive and defeat the Predator.  In competitive mode, the basic game mechanics are the same, but players take on the role of the Predators, whose objective is to hunt their prey and earn the most honor.

The new game takes you through Predator 1 and 2 and is 100% compatible with Legendary Encounters: an Alien Deck Building Game.

Designed for 1 to five players, the game includes 700 cards featuring all new original art, a full color 33” x 14” game mat and color rule book, with a retail price of $59.99.

Get the game today!

 

 

 

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Upper Deck Announces Marvel Avengers Posters

Released for the first-time ever – Super-Heroes, Super-Villains and Super-Thrills abound in this incredible new piece of classic comic book art created exclusively for the Upper Deck Gallery!

Avengers fans will appreciate these iconic comic covers that brought the very first adventures to life of some of their most beloved Avengers, and presented the team together for the first time. Originally penciled by an impressive lineup of legendary Marvel artists, these 9 classic comic book covers come together in a must-have piece for Avengers fans and collectors of classic comic artwork.

Avengers Origins is a 24” x 36” frame-worthy snapshot of comic book history that is limited to just 250 pieces and individually hand numbered. Each lithographed piece comes with an original Upper Deck Certificate of Authenticity and is currently on sale exclusively at www.UpperDeckGallery.com for $34.99.

An even rarer version of this incredible print is available as a sophisticated, sepia color cast with subtle metallic ink treatments. This short printed lithograph is hand numbered to just 100 pieces and comes with a corresponding Upper Deck Certificate of Authenticity. Available exclusively at www.UpperDeckGallery.com for $54.99, while supplies last.

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SDCC 2015: Upper Deck’s Exclusives and Debut of UD Gallery!

Upper Deck announced today the launch of UD Gallery, a new portfolio of premium, limited edition posters that feature all original artworks of fan favorite comic and movie characters.

The first release features a striking illustration of acclaimed Marvel Superhero Daredevil against a stained glass mosaic, depicting characters from across the Daredevil universe. This original art piece will be available to collectors as a limited edition print numbered to 250, available exclusively at www.UpperDeckGallery.com with a price of $59.99, and also as a more rare color variant print, available exclusively at Comic-Con International. The variant print is hand numbered to just 100 and comes with a price tag of $99.99.

The company has collaborated with a number of top tier artists to provide fans with a wide variety of illustration styles and prints. New releases will be announced through the UD Gallery website, with one original print and one variant print scheduled to release each month. Each new limited-edition poster will be printed on heavy premium paper using a silk screen or 4-color lithograph process. Prints are all hand numbered and come with an original Certificate of Authenticity (COA).

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Game Review: Legendary Villains – Fear Itself

legendaryFollowing on the perhaps poorly conceived relaunch/reintegration of the Marvel Legendary franchise from Upper Deck comes one of the most bizarre choices possible for the continuation of the series.  The previous Villains title offered some fan favorites, though acting as the protagonists rather than as the the villains, potentially strange choice for the format which has mostly favored heroes.  This expansion, the first of the Villains base game and the seventh title thus far in this series, takes on the same dynamic with the strangest inspiration yet.  While there might have been a few minor problems with previous releases, they nonetheless gave fans an outlet for their favorite characters by providing a lot of these favorites as playable characters.  For instance while some of the mechanics of the Guardians of the Galaxy expansion were a little different from what had come before, at least fans got to play as their favorite character from the books or movie.

While Marvel doesn’t tend towards the company wide crossover as much as DC Comics does, it still occurs, and one of the more recent crossovers was also one of the more lackluster – Fear Itself.  Although big things were planned for this story, it ended up as a bit of a missed opportunity for Marvel to pull out all the stops.  This crossover thus is a strange inspiration for the first expansion of this series.  After all while the villain focused approach to the games might be a little weird, it is still conceivable that someone might want to play as Magneto or Venom.  But how many comic/board games fans have always wished that they could invoke the essence of Null or Skadi?  No?  Then how about Kuurth, Nerkkod or Greithoth?  Probably also no.  It is conceivable, especially considering that the following expansion is for Secret Wars, that there is some hope of a boost to sales of trade paperbacks through these release of expansions for the Legendary Universe, because really nothing else makes sense in terms of the overall logic behind the releases.

For the non-comic fans among the gamers interested in the Legendary franchise, this will likely be more of the same, another sequence of cards that mean little outside of their in game text, but for fans of both mediums, they are likely to be somewhat confused by the choices here.  It is nice to see some of the usual Marvel heroes making an appearance here as adversaries, but once again that is only a tease for their own inclusion in the game itself as playable characters (such as Ms. Marvel.)  On the whole this is the most confusing and least sensical of all the expansions thus far, taking the direction of the otherwise fun base game(s) in a strange direction.

Score: 7.0

Game Review: Legendary Villains

legendaryLegendary Villains, the standalone semi-expansion to Upper Deck’s Legendary lineup adds in components which will perhaps look a bit different for gaming fans even if comic fans are not surprised by putting the villain in the spotlight.  In recent years the role of the villain as protagonist has been a popular enough one in comics, with the likes of Magneto, Deathstroke and Sinestro each getting their own series.  While this is a popular enough theme in comics, it doesn’t necessarily compute the same with my gaming fans.  Many gaming fans like games because of the challenges which are posed, be that a need for cunning or dexterity, but rarely do gamers end up playing the role of the bad guy in games.  In fact certain games such as “The Doom That Came to Atlantic City” are not as well liked specifically because players are forced into contests of destruction as opposed to heroism.

That being the case, this is a strange enough concept as applied to a table top board game, but it is equally true that the medium of board games has to be shaken up every now and then with something new to the mix in order to keep the games relevant and challenging enough.  The question though is whether this is that game, and the answer is … not really.  This game acts as primarily as game of opposites from the original Legendary base game with villains swapping places with heroes and vice versa.  Although it is nice to see some characters that have been bypassed so far by the Legendary universe (for instance Wasp), they also show up only as enemies to the main characters, who are the villains.  The choice of the characters is reminiscent of the original version, with a wide enough spectrum of choice – Bullseye, Dr. Octopus, Electro, Enchantress, Green Goblin, Juggernaut, Kingpin, Kraven, Loki, Magneto, Mysterio, Mystique, Sabretooth, Ultron and Venom.  The commander cards are a bit more more limited in scope – Dr. Strange, Nick Fury, Odin and Professor X.  As whole the game comes off as being pretty much of a copycat, except for those that want to play as villains which might be a thing for comic fans, but probably less so for the strict gamers.

While the game might struggle in terms of its applicability to non-comic fans and in its lack of originality, it also deserves some mention in its use as an expansion for the base game.  As this is essentially an opposite version of the original, the game text is easily changed for interplay with the original by negating the game text (for instance bystanders are captured/freed.)  While this does add a bit to the overall dynamic for the series, it also doesn’t do so by much.  Whereby the expansions thus far have added to the game play by pushing the series forward in certain directions in terms of story telling, this does not do so as much.  While there are instances in comics of heroes banding together with villains against a common threat, it also doesn’t happen all that often.  Also due to the individuals chosen for the games, if choosing randomly from the entire selection it would be possible to play character versus characters, for instance either Kingpin or Professor X as both character and main villain/commander.  One way in which this expansion does expand the game is by the use of even more specialized bystander cards, though these don’t really justify the cost of the entire game as an expansion only.

As a game this is a bit of a letdown, though still enjoyable, especially that the theme is a bit off mark.  As an expansion it has similar problems, providing some fun new options but also missing the mark where it might have helped more.  This thus stands as a passable game, but the bigger letdown of the series thus far.

Score: 7.4

Game Review: Legendary Paint The Town Red Expansion

legendaryThe “Paint the Town Red” expansion for Legendary is the third expansion in the series, and the second in a row with a stronger thematic concept.  Although the second expansion came right out and declared itself the Fantastic Four expansion, this is definitely the Spider-Man expansion even though it doesn’t really identify itself as such except for the box art.  As an overall analysis of this game series reveals, it is the street level characters that are the bigger push in terms of popularity, but it is also these characters, their villains and these villains’ schemes which make for a much easier game play experience.  The Dark City expansion helped a bit to counter this trend of the street level scenarios being that much easier to play, but this expansion goes much closer to the original trend.  As opposed to the grand schemes of certain villains, this expansion plays out a lot more like a Spider-Man comic, fun at times but never in any real danger that the characters (or in this case the players) are in much danger.

The focus here is all Spider-Man, meaning that anyone expecting more variety will be disappointed.  Instead this sticks close to the Spider-Man story lines with Black Cat, Moon Knight, Scarlet Spider, Symbiote Spider-Man and Spider-Woman.  The schemes are equally related, focusing on Carnage and Mysterio and various spider-related problems, although one does strive for a bit more by trying to take on the Clone Saga.  As with the Fantastic Four expansion, this does little to expand any of the more disappointing mechanics of the game, as the S.H.I.E.L.D. draw pile and the bystanders are once again left untouched.  This is an expansion on the same scale as the Fantastic Four expansion, incorporating in fewer cards while also adding to the refinement of the game play experience.

At this point the “street vs. skies” divide in this game might almost be moot anyway.  At the very least the base game is required to play Paint the Town Red, but by incorporating in the other expansions the imbalance between the two character types is less evident.  While heavy hitters like the Fantastic Four might have no trouble in a street level scenario, at least in this way one can face Black Cat against Galactus and see what happens.  That is the fun of these expansions, is that their price is not outlandish, and that they therefore help to build the game easily and inexpensively, even if the individual expansion offers little else new, the sum ends up being greater the parts.

Score: 8.2 

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