Tag Archives: travis lanham

Review: Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Luke Skywalker #1

Discover an untold story about Luke Skywalker set around Return of the Jedi! Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Luke Skywalker #1 is by:

Story: Greg Pak
Art: Chris Sprouse, Scott Koblish, Stefano Landini
Inks: Karl Story, Marc Deering
Color: Tamra Bonvillain
Letterer: Travis Lanham

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #2

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge #2

If you asked me to guess the quality of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #2, I’d have been way off. I’ll admit I was a bit biased going in to reading the issue as it’s a tie-in to a theme park. Those types of comics don’t exactly do well. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge though, is a bit different. The comics are focused on the Star Wars aspect first and theme park second. It also brilliantly balances a meta-story while also being an anthology.

Dok-Ondar is surrounded by the First Order who’s not too happy with him. With a Jedi lightsaber present, Dok-Ondar recounts how he came across the Jedi artifact. That story? It’d involve Greedo and the notorious gangster Jabba the Hutt!

Writer Ethan Sacks brilliantly mixes the various eras of Star Wars in this comic. The lightsaber is from the prequels. Greedo we know, and the flashback takes place, during the original trilogy. This series’ main story is during the sequel trilogy. Sacks works all three together and does so in a seamless way.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #2 also balances humor and action. With Greedo as the main star of the story, at times you feel like it’s a Han Solo adventure. Greedo has the attempted swagger of Solo but is an utter failure in what he does. That combination creates a lot of comedy delivering a fun read that’ll get you to laugh or at least enjoy the pulp like feel of it all.

Will Sliney‘s art helps as well. Again, with theme-park tie-ins, I don’t recall the art being all that good. Sliney, with colorist Dono Sanchez-Almara and Protobunker along with letterer Travis Lanham have broken that stereotype. Along with Sacks’ writing, the art has a fun quality element to it all. It’s clear the team is channeling Solo with Greedo. His body language will remind you of the hero. But, that helps, as Greedo is such a screw up, the positive memory is twisted by Greedo’s failures. The art is a driver of the humor.

The issue is a solid one as this series feels like it’s improving. The ability to blend together so many eras of Star Wars is impressive. At the same time the issue really drives home it’s writing its own new addition to that history. This is becoming a surprisingly fun series that’s a perfect summer read.

Story: Ethan Sacks Art: Will Sliney
Color: Dono Sanchez-Almara with Protobunker

Letterer: Travis Lanham
Story: 8.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.45 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Han Solo – Imperial Cadet

Have you wondered about Han Solo’s time at the Imperial Academy? Star Wars: Han Solo – Imperial Cadet fills in some of that mystery diving in to his time training. The trade collects Star Wars: Han Solo – Imperial Cadet #1-5 and Star Wars: Beckett.

Story: Robbie Thompson, Gerry Duggan
Art: Leonard Kirk, Edgar Salazar, Marc Laming, Will Sliney
Ink: Leonard Kirk, Daniele Orlandini, Cory Hamscher
Color: Arif Prianto, Jordan Boyd
Letterer: Joe Caramagna, Travis Lanham

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores on May 15! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Savage Avengers #1

Savage Avengers #1

The most savage, most unkillable team of characters in the Marvel Universe is assembled! Wolverine! Venom! Elektra! Punisher! And in their midst – Conan the Barbarian! Conan has returned to the Marvel Universe and his new adventures begin here. What is the City of Sickles? Who is the Marrow God? How is the Hand involved?

There’s a lot to like about Savage Avengers #1 but also a lot to shrug about as well. Written by Gerry Duggan, the first issue brings Conan in the Marvel Universe after his re-introduction in the recent event Avengers: No Road Home. Stuck in the Savage Land, Conan does what he does and as presented the comic generally feels like a Conan comic but just with other Marvel characters and settings.

The debut issue feels like it breaks away from expectations in a way dropping the reader into what feels like any Conan comic but just with a different setting. As the issue progresses new layers are added folding in the Marvel Universe and blending Conan into the Marvel world that we know in a way that’s not jarring. It works because it attempts to create a natural progression instead of something like Conan is just recruited.

The story itself is beyond familiar with Conan wanting treasure and Wolverine on the hunt to stop something the Hand is familiar with. It takes elements we’ve seen multiple times and blends them together the further the story goes along. Throw in some Lovecraftian elements and the result is a weird and fun experience that generally works more than expected.

Mike Deodato Jr.‘s art is the highlight of the issue with coloring from Frank Martin and lettering by Travis Lanham. There’s a fantasy like quality about it all that really feels fun as it blends in elements like the Hand, Wolverine, and Brother Voodoo. The action is solid with visual comedic elements to it that change the tone to a bit more lighthearted fun. But, what really works is the blending of so many different elements into a situation that visually doesn’t look at of place. It’s a potluck world and yet all the elements work together in their own way.

The issue is a nice start. It’s entertaining and fun though doesn’t quite have the explosive hook that has me completely bought in for the next issue. The comic feels like a regular Conan issue with a different setting. The product feels like a Marvel roleplaying game where the dungeon master has brought together a lot of elements because no one could quite decide the direction to go. But, those stories can still be a hell of a lot of fun and the expectation is the first arc will be an off the rails adventure of which we’re just getting a taste.

Story: Gerry Duggan Art: Mike Deodato Jr.
Color: Frank Martin Letterer: Travis Lanham
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 7.15 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge #1

Black Spire Outpost has long been frequented by smugglers, merchants and travelers from every corner of the galaxy looking to make their score on the infamous black market – or experience the exotic thrills only the remote world of Batuu has to offer. Beings like the infamous Dok-Ondar, a proprietor of rare and one-of-a-kind antiquities, thrive on the unique opportunities which abound on the lawless outpost at the very edge of Wild Space! But the evil First Order has come to Batuu and the survival of the entire outpost is at stake! The road to Black Spire’s possible salvation might begin in the past…with a job Han Solo and his partner Chewbacca pulled for Dok-Ondar.

When I heard Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge was a tie-in to the upcoming theme park I honestly didn’t have much hope or expectations. Such tie-ins have been entertaining and cute but few really stand out as interesting or vital. When it comes to it being a Star Wars comic, the standard is a bit higher due to Marvel’s pedigree with their line.

Written by Ethan Sacks, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1 is an entertaining comic introducing us to a new setting and new set of characters who we’ll set upon this adventure with. The point and focus on the comic is a bit unclear to start though as we’re told of a heist in the past pulled off by Han Solo and Chewbacca. The point isn’t quite clear in what that has to do with the present situation but by issue’s end we’re off in the direction of the main focus of it all. That should be entertaining but it’ll be another issue before things really get rolling.

What Sacks, along with artist Will Sliney, colorist Dono Sánchez-Almara and letterer Travis Lanham have put together is a new chapter in the Star Wars myth. New characters. New location. Some interesting twists that expand upon what we know. This first issue is a fun exploration of it all though lacks a depth to really make things interesting. The look of the characters, the story told, the personalities, it feels all very amusement park which makes sense based on the origin of the series. There’s something very non-offensive about it as though every detail is thought through as to what might make the next ride interesting and popular.

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1 is an interesting debut but on its own it’s rather forgetable as is. Maybe as the series progresses there’ll be more there to truly make it interesting but beyond new characters there’s little to hook long time Star Wars fans or comic readers.

Story: Ethan Sacks Art: Will Sliney
Color: Dono Sánchez-Almara with Protobunker
Lettering: Travis Lanham
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Age of Conan Belit #1

In a breath of fresh air, Marvel Comics has used its newly reacquired Conan license not just to tell stories about the titular barbarian, but also about members of his supporting cast. First up is Belit, the pirate queen, who first appeared in the 1934 “Queen of the Black Coast” story, also popped up in previous Conan stories for both Marvel and Dark Horse, and taught Conan everything about piracy. Writer Tini Howard (Euthanauts), artist Kate Niemczyk (Mockingbird), and colorist Jason Keith (Uncanny X-Men) tell her origin story in a rousing saga of action, heartbreak, and searching for mythical sea monsters.

Having a real cartoonist like Niemczyk on Belit #1 instead of some Frank Frazetta wannabe painter is a real treat and gives the comic a tone never ending activity. She can tell a story in both the foreground and background, which is showcased in the one page sequence where Belit’s father, the former Dread Admiral Atrahasis is jumped by some mercenaries, who he pissed off back in his seafaring days. With a light stroke and blue sky from Keith, Niemczyk makes it seem like the men grabbing Atrahasis are just a mirage to Belit. However, by the end of the page, Belit’s life will never be the same.

Howard and Niemczyk do pull off some great father/daughter moments in Belit #1 as she is taught to be a great fighter, sailor, and leader. Their relationship reminds me a lot of Ned and Arya Stark’s in the best way with Atrahasis telling his daughter realistic truths about the perils of leading an army of killers while she wants to sail and fight sea monsters. It is the emotional crux of this first issue, and Belit learns many harsh truths about honor and revenge, power vacuums and politics when her father is marooned on a sandbar by rival pirates.

Belit #1 walks a delicate line between the romance of adventure fantasy and the reality of the consequences of war. A man who is responsible for killing and plundering so many people doesn’t get to retire and play the Hyborian Age equivalent of nine hole golf. Howard shows this sentiment through beautiful, yet not too flowery speeches along with Niemczyk’s resigned facial expressions and a gorgeous, yet tragic orange sunset palette from Jason Keith.

Belit #1 has a fantastic visual and verbal synergy with Howard using dialogue to build character traits like Belit’s ferocity and her old teacher N’yaga’s dark pragmatism, and Niemczyk choosing the right moment for close-up to show Belit’s emotional state. Niemczyk also has the flair for the dramatic by tipping the page vertically during a big ship boarding scene that turns the tables of the story so far. It lays the foundation for an environment where Belit can truly become a pirate queen before ending on an atmospheric final page.

Age of Conan: Belit #1 sheds some insight on the dark, yet adventurous early days of the woman who would become the Queen of the Black Coast. Tini Howard, Kate Niemczyk, and Jason Keith work in tandem to construct a character arc for Belit as well as a fast moving, swashbuckling plot that isn’t bogged down in thees, thous, and world building. Belit is fierce as hell, and I can’t wait to learn more about her journey to become one of the deadliest fictional pirates in this series.

Story: Tini Howard Art: Kate Niemczyk
Colors: Jason Keith Letters: Travis Lanham
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Age of Republic – Padmé Amidala

Padmé Amidala is on a secret diplomatic mission in this one-shot comic from Jody Houser, Cory Smith, Wilton Santos, Walden Wong, Marc Deering, Java Tartaglia, and Travis Lanham.

Get your copy in comic shops today! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Meet the Skrulls #1

Meet the Skrulls! They could be your neighbors, boss, student, or friend. Meet the Skrulls #1 takes a look at an undercover family on a secret mission by Robbie Thompson, Niiko Henrichon, Travis Lanham, and Laurent Frossat.

Get your copy in comic shops today! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2ERogjG

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Cosmic Ghost Rider Destroys Marvel History #1

What happens when you have the Cosmic Ghost Rider recount Marvel history “Drunk History” style? You get Cosmic Ghost Rider Destroys Marvel History #1 by Paul Scheer, Nick Giovannetti, Gerardo Sandoval, Victor Nava, Antonio Fabela, and Travis Lanham.

Get your copy in comic shops today! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Captain Marvel: Braver & Mightier #1

Captain Marvel Braver and Mightier #1

HERO FOR A DAY, HERO FOR A PLANET! It’s CAROL DANVERS Day! Air Force Pilot Carol Danvers is a hero to many…so what could possibly delay her to her own celebration? Only her other job—as Earth’s Mightiest Hero, CAPTAIN MARVEL! Stuck between her duty to her community and her responsibility to the wider world, Carol will have to make a tough decision, and muster all of her power to fend off an invasion force! Don’t miss the excitement of the STRONGEST & MIGHTIEST hero of all in her latest adventure!

Had I realized Jody Houser was writing this, I’d have been a hell of a lot more excited to read this than I initially was. Not that I wasn’t interested in the comic, but rather that Houser is one of those writers who can craft a tale that’s equal parts inspiring, accessible, fun and awesome whilst fitting it into less than 25 pages of a comic book.

If, like me, you’ve got an idea as to who Captain Marvel is without having read too many of her comics, Captain Marvel: Braver & Mightier #1 is a great place to dip your toes into the waters of Marvel’s premier league superhero. If you haven’t got a clue who she is, but want a bit of a primer ahead of the movie coming next month, then you couldn’t get a better comic.

Houser captures the essence of the character within the very first three pages (one of which is a double spread). I realize I said I hadn’t read too many of the characters comics before, which is true, but Houser’s writing makes me feel like Carol Danvers is an old friend I haven’t seen in awhile. That is comic is just two people catching up over a coffee. This effect is partly achieved by also focusing on two highschool reporters waiting for Carol to arrive at a press conference, and through their very organic and natural feeling banter we get a further sense of who Carol Danvers is, and how the world perceives her.

That the dialogue in this comic feels so natural isn’t a surprise to me; Jody Houser is in the top echelon of writers when it comes to dialogue. Her comics are consistently intelligently written with each character’s words feeling very organic – even when used for exposition.

Simone Buonfantino‘s art is many things in this comic, but primarily it is awesome. The incoming space battle at the outset of the issue edges on the One Verses Many cliche, but Buonfantino lays out the pages with aplomb, the depth of space underscoring the threat closer to home, and the one hero standing between Earth and invasion.

Cliche aside, it’s a subtly brilliant underscoring of just how powerful Captain Marvel is.

Returning to Earth, we’re treated to scenes which offset the space battles with various reporters waiting, almost bored, for Carol to return to Earth. The two highschoolers aside, I loved the indication that superheroes have become so common place that waiting for one to arrive at a press conference is a chore. It’s a scene that has echoes of sports reporters waiting for an athlete to show up verses younger reporter/fan-types waiting. Again, a subtle yet crucially indicative moment to the audience as to just who Captain Marvel is, and the role she plays in the Marvel Universe.

And the role she will play in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Because let’s face it, unless you’re already a fan of the character, you’re reading this in advance of the movie to get a handle or refresher on the character. It’s what I did. My friends, let me tell you happily that Captain Marvel: Braver & Mightier #1 is ideal for that. You really can’t go wrong with this. It’s easily the best book of the week for me by a country mile.

Story: Jody Houser Art: Simone Buonfantino
Colour Art: Erick Arciniega Letterer: Travis Lanham
Story: 9.3 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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