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A First look at a few pages from Catwoman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular!

DC is celebrating Catwoman‘s 80th anniversary this April! The character debuted alongside Batman in 1940’s Batman #1 and since has become an icon.

To honor this publishing milestone, on April 15, 2020, DC will celebrate Catwoman’s 80th anniversary with a landmark one-shot, Catwoman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1.

With about a month to go, DC has given us a tease a to what we can expect. Below are pages by Tom King, Mikel Janin, Jordie Bellaire, and Clayton Cowles. DC has also shared Joëlle Jones’ cover and Ty Templeton’s pinup from the issue.

Catwoman 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1

Preview: Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular

Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular

(W) Marv Wolfman, Chuck Dixon, Devin Grayson, Tim Seeley, Tom King, Judd Winick, James TynionIV, Amy Wolfram, Robbie Thompson, Adam Glass, Peter J. Tomasi, Others (A) Tom Grummett, Scott McDaniel, Mikel Janin, Kenneth Rocafort, Freddie Williams II, Javi Fernandez, Nicola Scott, Dustin Nguyen, Andy Kubert, Frank Miller, Others (CA) Lee Weeks
Prestige Format
In Shops: Mar 18, 2020
SRP: $9.99

DC Comics celebrates Robin the Boy Wonder’s 80th anniversary in style with an all-star creative team representing each iteration of the iconic character across eight decades of history! From the high-flying adventures of Dick Grayson to the tragedy of Jason Todd, the enthusiasm of Tim Drake and the arrogance of Damian Wayne, the persistence of Stephanie Brown and the rebelliousness of Carrie Kelley-the mantle of Robin has been worn by many, but always represents one thing: a hero.

Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular

Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes’ ‘Dare’ Does Space Hero Satire Better than ‘Strange Adventures’

While I was reading Strange Adventures #1, or Tom King, Mitch Gerads, and Evan Shaner’s latest comic on King’s military service and his regrets and feelings about working for the CIA as well as how much he loves his wife starring a DC Comics B-list character, I had the sneaking suspicion I’d read a better version of this comic. That comic was Dare: The Controversial Memoir of Dan Dare by Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes that was serialized in the UK comics magazines Revolver and Crisis in 1990-1991 before being reprinted by both FantagraphicsMonster Comics imprint and Image Comics.

Before going into the whole anything Tom King/Scott Snyder/Geoff Johns has done, a British Invasion writer like Alan Moore or Grant Morrison has done better (And decades before.), I’ll look at the surface similarities between Strange Adventures and Dare. Created in 1958 and 1950 respectively, Adam Strange and Dan Dare have the same Space Age DNA and were influenced by previous sci-fi action heroes, Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers. In his early stories, Adam Strange was accidentally transported from an archaeology dig to the planet Rann where he protected the planet from invaders and fell in love with their princess, Alanna. Dan Dare’s stories were set in the “future” of the 1990s, and he was a pilot in the Interplanet Space Fleet, who explored other planets and protected Earth from the invasions of the villainous Treen.

Strange Adventures #1

Strange Adventures and Dare show both Adam Strange and Dan Dare as way past their prime with Dare having a little more satirical bite. The framing narrative of Strange Adventures is Adam Strange going on a book tour where he gets asked questions some friendly, some antagonistic about his actions in Rann, and this ramps up when one of his critics is found with a laser blast in his head. In Dare, Dan Dare is disabled, living off a military pension, and struggling writing his memoirs when Gloria Monday (A stand-in for Margaret Thatcher.) asks him to be the symbol of her re-election campaign even as he begins to find out that her government may have been responsible for the death of his old ally, Dr. Jocelyn Peabody.

Strange Adventures and Dare use the Pykkt Empire (Created for the series) and the Treen respectively as stand-in’s for the “other”. Strange Adventures seems to be using the Pykkt as a commentary on American interventionism in the Middle East (Which is where Tom King served.) with Shaner staging the Adam Strange flashbacks on a desert planet with him fighting a solider with a head and face covering. Dare uses the Treen as a general metaphor for the rebirth of British imperialism, but especially the Falklands War with Hughes’ clever parodies of the Sun‘s violent, xenophobic headlines and the connection between that war and Gloria Monday, er, Margaret Thatcher’s reelection in 1983.

Dan Dare

I will throw up a quick disclaimer that Dare is a completed work while Strange Adventures has eleven more issues to tell its story. However, Dare is the stronger work of satire while King seems to be too close to the material he’s writing about to go from his personal experience to something more universal other than a fairly banal “Who is telling the truth?” Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes introducing Dan Dare as a pathetic figure drinking and popping painkillers in front of his fireplace looking more like Morrissey than a “boy’s own comic” hero, who can’t even write his memoirs properly. This desperation and need for money is why he basically sells his soul to the devil and lets Monday use his image for her reelection campaign in the midst of strikes and food shortages that were the reality in the U.K. when Thatcher was prime minister and have not gone away even with fancy things like interplanetary space travel.

In all aspects, Dare is an excellent work of social commentary that uses the iconic British comic strip character to skewer imperialism, racism, and Tory/Conservative policies that have persisted to 2020 with the government of Boris Johnson in the U.K. and Donald Trump in the United States. Towards the end of the second issue, Morrison and Hughes have Dare’s old batman (A military officer’s personal servant aka hooray for class tension.) , Digby with which he has a strained relationship, confront him for killing Treen children in his last space battle. Instead of making Dare contrite or remorseful, he is portrayed as defensive while still having the good point that Digby watched him gun down the Treen children when they revolted after being treated by both their own leader, Mekon, and Earth as a slave labor force. Dare’s disability, his addictions, and money issues make him a sympathetic figure, but Morrison and Hughes aren’t afraid to call him out on his actions and make a character created to inspire young boys to serve God and the British Empire look weak and morally compromised.

On the other hand, Strange Adventures #1 seems less concerned with broader social commentary and more about Tom King using yet another DC character to deal with how he personally feels about being in the CIA, albeit, with better visuals and less line-wide impact than Heroes in Crisis. The dialogue that Strange uses is telling as he implores Batman to “show them I’m innocent” in a dark-draped panel drawn by Mitch Gerads. Unlike Dare, which casts a skeptical eye on British pop iconography, and by extension, politics and foreign policy, Strange Adventures is about vindication.

Adam Strange has to be the exposition spouting hero drawn in a clean pulp style by Evan Shaner, and this tension between him and Mr. Terrific’s investigation looks like the driving force behind the series. He has to be the hero and have the big redeeming moment while Dare is impotent, can barely walk, and his imagery is used to uphold a government that is okay with turning “undesirable” humans into food called Manna in cahoots with the Treen leader, Mekon, that Dare fought so many years ago. For now, King seems content with self-involvement via superheroes instead of looking at larger systems of control like Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes did in Dare.

Dare ends with a bomb that Dare set in his old spaceship, Anastasia, going off and wiping out London, including Mekon, who was there celebrating Gloria Monday’s election as well as the protagonist himself before cutting to a blank drawing board in almost a similar manner to the way the ending of Animal Man showed Grant Morrison meeting his creation. It’s a stark, six panel reminder that Dan Dare’s creator, Frank Hampson, signed away the rights to his creation just like Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster did with Superman under predatory, work for hire contract.

Dare may have been a cheerful, heroic figure, but his creator, Hampson, did not reap a financial reward commensurate with his fame. Morrison and Hughes are using an iconic British character to basically flip off the comics establishment a couple years before the founding of Image Comics in a kind of metafiction and create a revolutionary story. It is highly unlikely that King, Gerads, and Shaner will do that to DC Comics/Warner Bros/A T and T, and at its best, Strange Adventures will be an attempt at pastiche and a dark deconstruction of a Silver Age space hero.

And the fact that Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes use an iconic figure in British pop culture instead of a character that rarely has his own title to tell their story of heroism being used to serve the predatory establishment instead of fighting for truth, justice, and all that stuff makes Dare a stronger story than Strange Adventures. This is despite the comic not being as well-known as Grant Morrison’s other work during that time period, including Zenith, Arkham Asylum, Animal Man, and Doom Patrol. And along with being a compelling work of satire, Dare has some wonderful flourishes like Rian Hughes’ brutalist approach to future architecture and world-building with a character remarking that Art Deco didn’t leave much room for places to live and shop and a cheeky sense of deadpan humor. (See any photoshoot scene featuring Dan Dare.)

If you’re looking for a story where so-called paragons of heroism are powerless to shake the bonds of systems of control, then Grant Morrison and Rian Hughes’ Dare is a comic worth reading. Instead of gazing at its own navel (Albeit in a visually interesting way by Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner) like Strange Adventures, Dare offers up a portrait of a society crumbling due to conservative social policies and choosing power over decency through the lens of a spaceman’s salad days.

Get a First Look at Strange Adventures #2

Strange Adventures #2

Written by Tom King
Art by Mitch Gerads and Evan “Doc” Shaner
Cover art by Mitch Gerads and Evan “Doc” Shaner
DC BLACK LABEL AGES 17+
In Shops: Apr 01, 2020
SRP: $4.99

What is the truth about Adam Strange? When an activist who publicly accused him of war crimes ends up dead, the public begins to doubt Strange’s stories about his adventures on the planet Rann—and he’s even starting to doubt himself. It’s going to take a special investigator (editor’s note—he’s terrific) to get to the truth, and he’s going to have to tear apart Adam Strange’s life and reputation to do it.

A special miniseries set on two worlds, it takes two artists to bring Strange Adventures to life. Mitch Gerads tackles the earthbound sequences, while Doc Shaner launches us into space. And it’s all written by Tom King, the Eisner Award-winning writer who brought you Mister MiracleOmega Men, and Sheriff of Babylon.

Strange Adventures #2, by Tom King, Mitch Gerads, Evan “Doc” Shaner and Clayton Cowles, hits shelves April 1, 2020.

Strange Adventures #2

Review: Strange Adventures #1

Strange Adventures #1

Writer Tom King has familiar themes that have run through his stories no matter the titles. His characters are soldiers suffering from trauma and questioning their roles. Strange Adventures #1 sticks to this formula but delivers an excellent debut, no matter how familiar it feels.

The story is split between two settings. Adam Strange is a war hero back on Earth on a book tour. We also get to see him fighting that war from his perspective. The two eras are split in artistic duties by Mitch Gerads and Evan Shaner. The two’s styles deliver a read whose are is in contrast to each other. One, a clearly exaggerated reality, the other the gritty post-war life.

Strange Adventures #1 seems to be the beginning of an exploration of the mythology of war “heroes.” It seems to question the reality we’re fed by the winners. It wants us to question this reality. It also seems to dive into the trauma experienced by veterans that we ignore as a society as we shower accolades and medals upon them. This is just the first issue but there’s a lot clearly laid out. All of it are popular topics for King’s writing. The former CIA officer seems to be continuing to work through his own experiences and thoughts on the realities of service that we as a society seem to ignore.

The art by Gerads and Shaner is top notch. The two’s styles are in contrast to each other. That, along with a shift in writing, hammers home that we’re not being fed reality in one of the settings. That the reality is being washed over in a pulp adventure. It’s an interesting choice that really emphasizes what’s going on. It also delivers two very different voices and shows off a pulp-style we haven’t seen from King.

Strange Adventures #1 delivers a debut that’ll get the reader to think and reflect. It’s an exploration of the horrors of war, during and after, in a pulp-adventure wrapping. While we’ve seen many of these themes before with King, the package and delivery is still top-notch. It’s a must get first issue that entertains and will get you to ponder.

Story: Tom King Art: Mitch Gerads, Evan Shaner
Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation:
Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Strange Adventures #1 (of 12)

Strange Adventures #1 (of 12)

(W) Tom King (A) Evan Shaner (A/CA) Mitch Gerads
In Shops: Mar 04, 2020
SRP: $4.99

After winning five Eisner Awards and topping year-end “best of lists,” the comic book of 2019 was Mister Miracle. The comic book of 2020 will be Strange Adventures.

The Mister Miracle team of writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads are joined by fan-favorite artist Evan “Doc” Shaner to bring you an epic tale in the tradition of Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns, and DC: The New Frontier-a story of blood, war, and love that readers will be talking about for years to come.

Adam Strange is the hero of Rann, a man famous throughout the galaxy for his bravery and honor. After leading his adopted home to victory in a great planetary war, Adam and his wife Alanna retire to Earth, where they are greeted by cheers, awards, and parades. But not all is as happy and nice as it seems, as the decisions Adam made during battles on Rann come back to haunt his family and threaten the entire DC Universe. And now a surprise DC hero will have to choose between saving Adam Strange and saving the world.

A story like no other, Strange Adventures is an ambitious, thrilling, shocking, and beautiful 12-issue saga that will push Adam Strange to the breaking point-and beyond!

Strange Adventures #1 (of 12)

DC Takes You on Strange Adventures with a New Trailer

After winning five Eisner Awards and topping year-end “best of lists,” the comic book of 2019 was Mister Miracle. The comic book of 2020 will be Strange Adventures.

The Mister Miracle team of writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads are joined by fan-favorite artist Evan “Doc” Shaner to bring you an epic tale in the tradition of Watchmen, The Dark Knight Returns, and DC: The New Frontier—a story of blood, war, and love that readers will be talking about for years to come.

Adam Strange is the hero of Rann, a man famous throughout the galaxy for his bravery and honor. After leading his adopted home to victory in a great planetary war, Adam and his wife Alanna retire to Earth, where they are greeted by cheers, awards, and parades. But not all is as happy and nice as it seems, as the decisions Adam made during battles on Rann come back to haunt his family and threaten the entire DC Universe. And now a surprise DC hero will have to choose between saving Adam Strange and saving the world.

A story like no other, Strange Adventures is an ambitious, thrilling, shocking, and beautiful 12-issue saga that will push Adam Strange to the breaking point—and beyond!

Strange Adventures

Strange Adventures Goes Black Label. Get a Look at this Early Preview

DC’s highly anticipated new maxi-series Strange Adventures, scheduled to be published on March 4, 2020, by the creative team of Tom King, Mitch Gerads, Evan “Doc” Shaner, and Clayton Cowles, will carry an Ages 17+ content descriptor on Gerads and Shaner’s card stock covers. With content akin to King and Gerads’ acclaimed Sheriff of Babylon and Mister Miracle, Strange Adventures is a story of blood, war, and love that readers will talk about for years to come.

With 28 story pages in each issue, Strange Adventures is an ambitious, thrilling, shocking, and beautiful 12-issue saga that will push Adam Strange to the breaking point—and beyond!

Edited by Jamie S. Rich and Brittany Holzherr, Strange Adventures will carry DC’s Black Label descriptor, identifying the content as appropriate for readers ages 17+. Strange Adventures will retail for $4.99 with card stock cover artwork by Mitch Gerads and Doc Shaner.

Strange Adventures #1

Celebrate Your Favorite Robin with Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 Decade Variant Covers!

On March 11th, 2020, DC celebrates the legacy of Batman’s crimefighting partner in the Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1, a special Prestige Format one-shot with top creators paying tribute to the teen hero originally dubbed the Boy Wonder. Today, DC reveals seven of the eight open-order decade variant covers spotlighting the various eras of Robin!

Jim Lee, Scott Williams, and Alex Sinclar’s 1940s variant cover will be released at a later date, as well as the color version of Jim Cheung and Tomeu Morey’s 1990s variant cover. 

Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 will feature decade variants by:

  • 1940’s variant cover by Jim Lee, Scott Williams, and Alex Sinclair
  • 1950’s variant cover by Julian Totino Tedesco
  • 1960’s variant cover by Dustin Nguyen
  • 1970’s variant cover by Kaare Andrews
  • 1980’s variant cover by Frank Miller
  • 1990’s variant cover by Jim Cheung and Tomeu Morey
  • 2000’s variant cover by Derrick Chew
  • 2010’s variant cover by Yasmine Putri

From the high-flying adventures of Dick Grayson to the tragedy of Jason Todd, the enthusiasm of Tim Drake and the arrogance of Damian Wayne, the persistence of Stephanie Brown and the rebelliousness of Carrie Kelley, the mantle of Robin has been worn by many, but always represents one thing: a hero.

Robin 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1with a main cover by Lee Weeks, includes contributions by writers Marv Wolfman, Chuck Dixon, Devin Grayson, Tim Seeley, Tom King, Judd Winick, James Tynion IV, Amy Wolfram, Robbie Thompson, Adam Glass, and Peter J. Tomasi, and artists Tom Grummett, Scott McDaniel, Mikel Janin, Kenneth Rocafort, Freddie Williams II, Javi Fernandez, Nicola Scott, Dustin Nguyen, Andy Kubert, and Frank Miller.

Around the Tubes

GLOW vs. the Babyface #3

Tomorrow is new comic book day! What’s everyone excited for? What do you plan on getting? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that, here’s an abbreviated collection of news and reviews from around the web.

The Comichron – December 2019 full estimates posted; King Batman finale enters Top 5 – For those that enjoy the race and live by estimates.

Reviews

AIPT – GLOW vs. the Babyface #3
But Why Tho – Thumbs Vol. 1

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