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Review: Batman #66

BATMAN #66 COMIC REVIEW – THE QUESTION OR THE ANSWER?

The “Knightmares” storyline continues! Something—or someone—is forcing Batman to live through some of his darkest fears, amplifying the Dark Knight’s anxieties and reimagining some of his worst traumas. Now that Batman has become aware of the nature of these delusions, he must find a way to break through and find out the source of this disruption. So who does he turn to for answers? Why, the Question, of course! But is Vic Sage just another figment of the Caped Crusaders imagination?

Preview: Batman #66

Batman #66

(W) Tom King (A) Jorge Fornes (CA) Mikel Janin
In Shops: Mar 06, 2019
SRP: $3.99

The “Knightmares” storyline continues! Something-or someone-is forcing Batman to live through some of his darkest fears, amplifying the Dark Knight’s anxieties and reimagining some of his worst traumas. Now that Batman has become aware of the nature of these delusions, he must find a way to break through and find out the source of this disruption. So who does he turn to for answers? Why, the Question, of course! But is Vic Sage just another figment of the Caped Crusaders imagination?

Batman #66

Review: Heroes in Crisis #6

Heroes in Crisis #6

Get a deeper look into the inner workings of Sanctuary. When heroes visited the facility, they relived their trauma through virtual reality, contending with the events that brought them there in the hope of reaching a meaningful resolution. That is, until the trauma took over and escalated these personal events into a full-blown crisis! Find out what pushed one of the superheroes over the edge and how it broke the machine.

For five issues we’ve gotten fake outs and twists and turns teasing us as to who the killer is and Heroes in Crisis #6 seems to deliver us the answer… which clearly isn’t the answer.

Written by Tom King, Heroes in Crisis #6 is an issue focused on three characters dealing with their trauma showing us how Sanctuary treats individuals using virtual reality. It’s something we’ve seen before and feels like a filler issue used because a few elements couldn’t be filled in elsewhere. It’s the first issue where I don’t feel like it adds much to the story beyond two things. The tragedy is shallow, the empathy little, and the fakeouts obvious.

The issue seems to finally answer who killed those staying at the facility which we know isn’t the answer and feels like yet another fakeout. It also points to who I’ve thought was the killer from the beginning and if it is, the event will feel more hollow than thoughtful.

Heroes in Crisis started with interesting promise of the exploration of exploring PTSD in heroes but at this point it feels like a dragged out murder mystery forgetting the tragedy we saw in those first few issues. Instead we get the same played out experiences as if we ourselves are placed in Sanctuary to experience trauma ourselves. And maybe that’s the point? But still, there’s something missing in this issue in both its presentation and what it lacks in adding to the overall narrative. It feels like we’ve seen most of this with different characters. When it comes to the exploration of Sanctuary it doesn’t add anything new.

The art mainly by Mitch Gerads is good. Gerads is always fantastic in that way and with some pages by Clay Mann the art is the most interesting thing about the comic begging us to look for visual hints and clues. Unfortunately that’s mostly blunt in many ways lacking finesse that has delivered for the previous five issues.

Heroes in Crisis #6 feels like a bad detour as the series drifts further away from the concept of heroes dealing with trauma. As a piece of the greater narrative the issue is fine but as we see in a few panels, the torture porn aspect of it all is emphasized here. It shifts from an attempt at empathy to an Eli Roth film.

We’ll see where the next few issues take us but this feels like a distraction. An added on issue that in the end it’s unsure as to what exactly to do with. It’s bloat that shifts the tone and focus of the story and not for the better.

Story: Tom King Art: Clay Mann, Mitch Gerads
Color: Mitch Gerads, Tomeu Morey Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 5.0 Art: 7.75 Overall: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Heroes in Crisis #6

Heroes in Crisis #6

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Mitch Gerads
RATED T+
In Shops: Feb 27, 2019
SRP: $3.99

Get a deeper look into the inner workings of Sanctuary. When heroes visited the facility, they relived their trauma through virtual reality, contending with the events that brought them there in the hope of reaching a meaningful resolution. That is, until the trauma took over and escalated these personal events into a full-blown crisis! Find out what pushed one of the superheroes over the edge and how it broke the machine. This special issue reunites the Eisner Award-winning MISTER MIRACLE team of writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads!

Heroes in Crisis #6

DC Reveals the Creative Lineup for Detective Comics #1000

DC Comics has unveiled full story details on the landmark 1,000th issue of Detective Comics, debuting on March 27, 2019. The 96-page Detective Comics #1000 celebrates the Dark Knight through a series of seven-to-nine-page standalone short stories from an all-star collection of the top writers and artists in Batman’s recent history including Tom King, Tony Daniel and Joëlle Jones, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo, Peter J. Tomasi and Doug Mahnke, Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev, Warren Ellis and Becky Cloonan and more.

The full lineup of stories, writers and artists to be featured in Detective Comics #1000 is:

“Medieval,” by Peter J. Tomasi and Doug Mahnke

Appearing in DC’s comic book continuity for the very first time, a new and mysterious version of the Arkham Knight will be debuting in a story that looks at Batman’s encounters with his villains throughout his career through the Arkham Knight’s eyes—but the Knight’s scheme remains to be seen.

“Batman’s Longest Case,” by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo

One of the most popular talent teams in the history of the Dark Knight delivers a tale in which Batman follows clues around the world, leading him back to his home in Gotham City and to a secret organization that has been keeping tabs on him for years.

“Manufacture for Use,” by Kevin Smith and Jim Lee

The fan-favorite director of Clerks and one of Batman’s most visionary artists present a story that cuts between Batman fighting his greatest villains and his attempts to track down the gun that killed his parents.

“The Legend of Knute Brody” by Paul Dini, Dustin Nguyen, Derek Fridolfs and John Kalisz

The villains of Gotham speak, documentary-style, about that one henchman they each hired who was the absolute WORST at his job, constantly screwing up their plans.

“The Batman’s Design” by Warren Ellis and Becky Cloonan

Warren Ellis pens “The Batman’s Design” with Becky Cloonan, the first woman to draw Batman in the main comic series, in a story of Batman pursuing a pack of technologically enhanced mercenaries into a warehouse, where they think they’ve trapped him.

“Return to Crime Alley” by Denny O’Neil and Steve Epting

A direct sequel to O’Neil’s classic “There Is No Hope in Crime Alley,” from Detective Comics #457, in which Leslie Thompkins takes Batman to task for his addiction to violence, which, in her mind, perpetuates the horror that birthed him.

“Heretic” by Christopher Priest and Neal Adams

Two of the biggest powerhouse writers and artists in the comic book industry work together on a story featuring Batman helping a young man escape from Ra’s al Ghul’s League of Assassins— who then turned up in Gotham, dead. Batman travels to Tibet with a message for the League.

“I Know” by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev

The creative team behind SCARLET takes a unique future look at Batman and the Penguin. The Penguin comes to an elderly, wheelchair-bound Batman to tell him of the time that he learned Batman was Bruce Wayne—and to explain why he never did anything with that information. This story is available to read in its entirety on DCComics.com.

“The Last Crime in Gotham” by Geoff Johns and Kelley Jones

Superstar writer Geoff Johns and famed artist Kelley Jones tell a future story where the future family of Batman and Catwoman face off in a battle with the family of The Joker and Harley Quinn.

“The Precedent” by James Tynion IV and Alvaro Martinez

The team of James Tynion IV and Alvaro Martinez return to DETECTIVE COMICS after their highly successful Rebirth run, in a story of the night Bruce Wayne made the decision to bring Dick Grayson into his dark world, ending with the classic candlelight oath.

“Batman’s Greatest Case” by Tom King, Tony Daniel and Joëlle Jones

Groundbreaking BATMAN writer Tom King is joined by Tony Daniel and Joëlle Jones, who share artistic duties on the story. Presented using parallel story threads, Bruce Wayne visits his parents’ grave while Batman assembles his entire coalition of allies around him.

In addition to the above stories, Detective Comics #1000 will feature additional art from Mikel Janín and Amanda Conner, as well as a two-page spread from Jason Fabok depicting the current state of the Batman universe and its heroes and villains.

To further celebrate the Caped Crusader’s 80-year legacy, Detective Comics #1000 will offer an extensive retailer variant cover program. Hard-core collectors will want to get their hands on this series of variant covers showcasing the Dark Knight through various decades from iconic Batman artists such as Steve Rude, Michael Cho, Jim Steranko, Bernie Wrightson, Frank Miller, Tim Sale, Jock and Greg Capullo—plus an homage to Jerry Robinson’s cover of November 1942’s Detective Comics #69 by Bruce Timm.

This 96-page oversize collector’s edition issue will be available at comics retailers and digitally on March 27, 2019, for $9.99.

Detective Comics #1000

Review: Heroes in Crisis #5

Heroes in Crisis #5

We’re at the half way point with one pretty big reveal to tease us more about what might have happened that resulted in the numerous deaths at Sanctuary.

Heroes in Crisis #5 is an interesting issue broken into three storylines. First, there’s the dealing with the leak that Sanctuary exists. Superman and Wonder Woman confront and acknowledge that in the public with a statement that threads throughout the issue. Then, there’s the investigation by Harley and Batgirl. And third there’s the investigation by Booster Gold.

Writer Tom King delivers an interesting issue that feels like the strongest of the series so far as it really lays out the need for mental health care and that there’s nothing to be ashamed about when it comes to it. Superman lays it out, the point of Sanctuary and people seeking care is a good thing. King feels like he’s making a statement to the reader more than anything and sadly it’s something that does need to be said.

King uses more confessionals to explore the various issues the heroes face and it’s everything from multiple deaths to addiction to abuse. All of it is tragic in its own way and it’s hard not to feel some empathy concerning what’s presented.

Then there’s the dual investigations. Both are interesting and it’s Booster’s that has a reveal that’s beyond intriguing. What I thought was going on might not be the case and now where I was once convinced as to who murdered the heroes, now, I’m not so sure.

What’s interesting about the two investigations is that they’re both being done by a duo. There’s Batgirl and Harley and Booster and Blue Beetle and the two pairings are very different in their approach and attitude. It’s an interesting comparison and the approach feels right for some reason.

What really stands out is the art by Clay Mann and Tomeu Morey which is truly breathtaking at times. There’s a level of detail that’s unreal with spreads that are absolutely amazing. Beetle and Booster on a couch, the folds of Harley’s outfit, the small things make the issue stand out in some of the best art I’ve seen in a long time. This is a comic where you’ll linger on the pages looking at what’s included.

This is an issue that feels like things are coming more into focus and the actual detective work begins. We’ve gotten what feels like false starts to the series in some ways but this issue really moves the story forward and gives us our real first clue as to what happened. This is a perfect middle point that has me excited to see where the rest of the series goes and it reminds us what the series is about, the trauma people experience and that it’s ok to seek help.

Story: Tom King Art: Clay Mann and Tomeu Morey
Story: 8.75 Art: 10 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Action Comics #1007

Action Comics #1007

(W) Brian Michael Bendis (A/CA) Steve Epting
In Shops: Jan 30, 2019
SRP: $3.99

The Kobra Cult conspiracy ensnares Daily Planet photographer Jimmy Olsen, drawing the attention of the Man of Steel. But be careful, Superman-there’s more lurking in the shadows of Metropolis than just a snake cult.

Action Comics #1007

Preview: Heroes in Crisis #5

Heroes in Crisis #5

(W) Tom King (A) Clay Mann (CA) Trevor Hairsine
In Shops: Jan 30, 2019
SRP: $3.99

The secrets of the DC Universe are hacked! Sanctuary wasn’t supposed to keep records, but now that the A.I. is compromised, superhero secrets are leaking all over the ‘Net. Booster and Harley set aside their differences to focus on who they believe is the real killer (assuming one of them isn’t lying, that is). Meanwhile, Batman and the Flash continue to investigate the mysterious murderer. The answer can be found in Sanctuary…but is it safe to go digging in the crime scene?

Heroes in Crisis #5

Preview: Batman #63

Batman #63

(W) Tom King (A/CA) Mikel Janin
In Shops: Jan 23, 2019
SRP: $3.99

There are strange goings-on in the dark alleys of Gotham City, mysteries that will require a different skill set than the Caped Crusader’s if he’s going to stop the whole city from succumbing to the darkness. John Constantine, the Hellblazer, is a person with just those skills-but after the events of “The Witching Hour,” is Constantine in any condition to help the Dark Knight Detective?

Batman #63
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