Tag Archives: tim seeley

Review: Bloodshot #8

Bloodshot #8

In Bloodshot #8, unthinkable monsters are unleashing Hell on Earth! Surrounded by enemies, who can Bloodshot trust?

It has been a long time since the previous issue was released, although there was an expanded edition with some bonus features released last month under the guise of Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition, but there wasn’t any new story content in that comic. On the off chance you didn’t pick that one up just for the bonus features, and I understand why you may not have, the good news is that you don’t need to remember Bloodshot #7 all that much to be able to enjoy this book because writer Tim Seeley has structured the comic in such a way that a chunk of time has passed between issues seven and eight. It’s not explicitly stated how much time, and whether this was an incredible stroke of luck given the break between issues because of Covid 19, or Seeley was able to adjust the dialogue just enough to convey a longer chunk of time passing than he originally intended, I’m not sure.

Frankly, as far as my enjoyment of the comic goes, I don’t particularly care which it was because the story and dialogue flow so well across every page (but I am genuinely curious as to whether he needed to adjust the text at all).

The story finds Bloodshot atoning for releasing a horde of formerly imprisoned enemies that all have some form of super powers, and may or may not have been used by their respective governments. Granted, he wasn’t in control of himself when he did it, but still he feels responsible for unleashing what he has.

Bloodshot has been one fast-paced and frenetic issue after another. It has been a great ride for the last seven issues. I’ve certainly enjoyed the series for what it is; a popcorn comic that has a depth to it that’s revealed further with each issue. Tim Seeley gives you a little more of his plan with each release. There are moments in this issue that change or enhance your idea of the characterizations of some characters inbetween the action. It’s this balance that allows you to fly through the book while still feeling like you’ve read more than the twenty-odd pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Marc Laming, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

If the above paragraph or two feel familiar to you it’s because I copied it from the review of the last issue. It was as true then as it is for this issue, and I didn’t feel like I should try and craftily rewrite the same thing when my feelings on the books hasn’t changed. Personally, I love how this book looks. The lines are clean and it’s very easy to discern what’s happening on every page. It’s an awesome book that consistently surprises me.

Every time I open an issue of Seeley’s Bloodshot, it reminds me why I love reading comics; it’s fun, looks great, and there’s always more meat to the story on the second and third read through as you pick up on the subtleties of Seeley’s dialogue and the details in the art. You can’t go wrong with this book – it’s a must-read for all the right reasons.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Marc Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: Bloodshot #8

BLOODSHOT #8

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by PEDRO ANDREO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE 
Cover A by TYLER KIRKHAM
Cover B by DIEGO BERNARD
Cover C by CRYSSY CHEUNG
Preorder Variant Cover by SHAWN CRYSTAL
On sale SEPTEMBER 16th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Unthinkable monsters are unleashing Hell on Earth!

Surrounded by enemies, who can Bloodshot trust?

BLOODSHOT #8

Review: Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition

Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition

Valiant’s supersoldier must hunt down monsters, aliens, living weapons, and other terrifying threats after they’re set loose from a top-secret facility in “The Burned” Part 1 – plus exclusive new content, and commentary from Kevin VanHook! All in the Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition!

Note: The story hasn’t changed at all in the Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition, and you’ll find the review for that below. This update is specifically talking about the added content to the comic.

Content that is designed to pull those who have already purchased the comic back to buy another one with a half dozen pages of extras, but is it enough? Eh… maybe. If you’re a super fan, or somebody who loves to learn about the history and the behind the scenes of comics, the answer is obvious, just as if it is if you haven’t read the book at all: Absolutely.

But if you’re more interested in the story? Well that can get a bit trickier. There’s a page with scenes from the comics that inspired the movie, which honestly, is two thirds a crock of shit with two panels taken from this series, which was released after the movie had finished filming, but before it hit cinemas. It feels like that was thrown in as filler, with panels that look kinda similar, so why not try it?

The next two pages of the extras are worth reading as Bloodshot co-creator Kevin Van Hook takes you on a tour of the character’s origin. It may be a story some are familiar with, but if you’re not then it’s a worthy read, followed by Tim Seely taking us on a quick look inside a certain page.

After that we get a breakdown of the characters in the series, which is great for new fans, but maybe less exciting for some.

Is the Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition worth buying if you’ve already picked up the story the first time it came through? Maybe – it depends on your interest in the character. For me, it’s a book I’ll be picking up when I hit up my LCS, but I’m one of those fans who loves the history of comics, and Van Hook’s section is worth the price of admission for me alone.


Original Review:

What better way to release a comic featuring the first character to appear on the big screen than by having it start with a new jumping on point? A first issue, you could say, and you wouldn’t be wrong – but with the comic already having had seven issues released (including Bloodshot #0) it would have been a touch disingenuous to renumber the series with the story still ongoing. Nobody would ever do that. Certainly not.

If you are looking to check the character out ahead of the movie, or you’re reading this after having seen the Sony Pictures Bloodshot movie starring Vin Diesal, then you’ll be happy to know that Bloodshot #7 is fairly new reader friendly. Cleverly paced dialogue that flows without feeling like forced exposition tells you everything you need to know.

Bloodshot has been one fast-paced and frenetic issue after another. It has been a great ride for the last seven issues. I’ve certainly enjoyed the series for what it is; a popcorn comic that has a depth to it that’s revealed further with each issue. Tim Seeley gives you a little more of his plan with each release. There are moments in this issue that change or enhance your idea of the characterizations of some characters inbetween the action. It’s this balance that allows you to fly through the book while still feeling like you’ve read more than the twenty-odd pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Marc Laming, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

If the above paragraph feels familiar to you it’s because I copied it from the review of the last issue. It was as true then as it is for this issue, and I didn’t feel like I should try and craftily rewrite the same thing when my feelings on the visuals haven’t changed. Personally, I love how this book looks. The lines are clean and it’s very easy to discern what’s happening on every page.

Bloodshot #7 isn’t the most original story. It won’t shake you to your core or have you asking yourself deeply introspective questions. But not every comic needs to do that. What Bloodshot does, it does very well. Seeley, Booth, and co have been remarkably consistent issue to issue, and I can’t really find any fault in an issue that does exactly what it says on the tin (that may be an obscure reference for you – it’s from a UK add originating in the late 90’s from a company called Ronseal).

Bloodshot remains one of the series I look forward to reading each month. This wasn’t the best comic I’ve read this week, but it still comes with a big fat stamp of approval from me.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Marc Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition

BLOODSHOT #7 FULLY LOADED EDITION

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by MARC LAMING, JASON MASTERS
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Photo Cover feat. Vin Diesel as BLOODSHOT
On sale AUGUST 12 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Valiant’s supersoldier must hunt down monsters, aliens, living weapons, and other terrifying threats after they’re set loose from a top-secret facility in “The Burned” Part 1 – plus exclusive new content, and commentary from Kevin VanHook!

BLOODSHOT #7 FULLY LOADED EDITION

Review: Vampire: the Masquerade: Winter’s Teeth #1

Vampire: the Masquerade #1

The White Wolf/Onyx Path RPG Vampire: the Masquerade returns to comics courtesy of Vault, and this issue is a wonderful entry point into a complex world of alliances, hierarchies, and yes, bloodthirst. Tim Seeley, Devmalya Pramanik, and Addison Duke handle the lead story of Vampire: the Masquerade #1 focusing on Cecily Bain, who is muscle for a vampire clan in Minneapolis. However, she also has a fiercely independent streak and the tiniest trace of a soft side beneath her murderous, take no shit attitude. On the flip side is Tini Howard, Blake Howard, and Nathan Gooden’s backup story about the anarch, Colleen, who isn’t beholden to the Twin Cities power struggle and just wants to make sure her and her vampire buddies survive to the next day. It was really nice to get two incredibly different perspectives on this rich world, especially as a newcomer to the franchise. (My only real exposure to Vampire the Masquerade was in the Baphomet/Morrigan-centric issue of WicDiv even though the lore has always fascinated, and I picked up some of the RPG sourcebooks via Humble Bundle.)

Seeley and Pramanik set up Cecily as an anti-hero with a heart of gold in Vampire: the Masquerade #1’s opening story. She proves her ruthlessness by killing the clan accountant’s girlfriend (He’s just valuable enough.) in the opening scene, but then she shows tenderness with her sister Karen, who has dementia, and a new vampire, Ali. Pramanik with the help of colorist Addison Duke uses intense shadows to create intimacy in their visuals and hint that Cecily is strongly considering turning Karen into a vampire so she doesn’t have to deal with the pain of completely losing her and also that her youth is restored.

This concern for the weak continues to Ali, who was sired by an anonymous vampire and is clan-less drifter in a highly hierarchical world except this may not be the case thanks to some suspenseful silent sequences from Seeley and Pramanik. Visually, Devmalya Pramanik and Addison Duke lean into an industrial, post-punk vibe that hints at past “glory days” for Cecily and Karen and also hinting that Cecily might have a sense of nostalgia between her tough, get the job done veneer. Her interest in alternative culture and music does dovetail nicely with her refusal to be more of a company woman and just do her job for the Prince instead of getting the vampire clan equivalent of a desk job and lose some of her precious freedom. (And, by extension, a lack of prying eyes on Karen.)

In both stories, Tim Seeley, Tini Howard, and Blake Howard lean on characterization and easy-to-connect-with personal relationships instead of the deep Vampire the Masquerade lore to drive the story. Without the vampirism, Colleen and her band of anarchs (Basically, vampire without a cause.) could be young people with wanderlust that favor the open road instead of stable jobs and lifestyles. The character sheet for Colleen (And Cecily too, while we’re here.) adds real depth to her character and the messed up relationship with her husband/sire Mitch and also acts as a rare peek at the bottom of the author’s theoretical iceberg. The backup is a free spirit to the rigid structures that Cecily encounters in the main story, and Addison Duke uses a lighter palette because as a thin blood, Colleen can actually go out during the day. The Howards and Gooden’s story adds depth and perspective via a momentum-filled On the Road with vampires plotline instead of relying on boring exposition to show what life as another kind of vampire is like.

With two memorable leads and a focus on showing readers what it’s like in the universe instead of exhaustively explaining its rules, Vampire: the Masquerade #1 is an enjoyable read even if you’re not familiar with the RPG. The dual nature of immortality shows up a lot in the comic, but Tim Seeley, Tini Howard, Blake Howard, Devmalya Pramanik, Nathan Gooden, and basically Gothic set-dresser Addison Duke dive into other implications of being a vampire in this world like navigating bureaucracies and complicated interpersonal relationship. Hey, it sounds like the real world, but with hotter outfits, blood, and fangs.

Story: Tim Seeley, Tini Howard, Blake Howard
 Art: Devmalya Pramanik, Nathan Gooden
Colors: Addison Duke Letters: Andworld

Story: 7.9 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Vault provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: The Crow: Lethe #3 (of 3)

The Crow: Lethe #3 (of 3)

(W) Tim Seeley (A) Ilias Kyriazis (CA) Peach Momoko
In Shops: Aug 05, 2020
SRP: $3.99

From writer/artist Tim Seeley (Green Lantern, Nightwing, Shatterstar), comes the thrilling conclusion of The Crow: Lethe. Null discovers the truth about himself as the forces of The Crow compel him to get revenge before the twisted Calvin Morgau can steal the souls of those he’s come to call family.

The Crow: Lethe #3 (of 3)

Preview: Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four: “Who Diss?”

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four

Written by Tim Seeley
Pencils Juan Ferreyra
Inks Juan Ferreyra
Colored by Juan Ferreyra
Lettering by Steve Wands
Purchase

“Who Diss?”
The Joker is a master of many things, but one of them is not the mic. When a mythical recording of the Joker’s disastrous rapping turns up as the grand prize in Gotham City’s most elite rap battle tournament, Harley Quinn enters the contest to win this most excellent way to humiliate her awful ex. But who are Gotham’s fiercest rappers? Can Harley Quinn hold her own? The answers will shock you.

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four

Review: Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four: “Who Diss?”

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four

Fridays can be looked forward to for more than the weekend, it’s also new chapters of Harley Quinn Black + White + Red. The DC Digital First series has stood out in the program as each chapter so far has stood on its own and none are alike. Each creative team, or single creator, really brings their voice and talent delivering their take on the modern classic character. Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four is no exception.

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four: “Who Diss?” has Harley entering a rap battle to get “the Joker Tape,” a mythical cassette featuring the Joker rapping. It’s a completely insane and out there take on the character and story and completely works. The chapter understands these are one and done stories and you can go out and just have fun with it. And the story is a lot of fun.

Writer Tim Seeley shows off his humor, and his rhymes, in a comic that is just too bizarre to describe. It’s a rap battle, that’s it, there’s not much more to it. And with that simple premise, Seeley makes sure to focus on the rhyme and the lyrics delivering some sick verses and beats that cut. It works and works well in that comic you can just read and enjoy. It’s silly fun.

Seeley’s concept works primarily due to Juan Ferrerya‘s art and Steve Wands‘ lettering. The art is delivered in interesting panels and angles as the lyrics are dropped back and forth. It delivers “action” to a concept that doesn’t have a lot of it. But, there’s something to the flow as well. The angle of the panels and stances of the characters help emphasize the rhythmic nature of it all. The lettering does that as well with key words emphasized and an attempt to bring the musical aspect of it all to the page. This is a story that really relies on the art to really deliver “the flow.”

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red Chapter Four is a crazy chapter that just works. It’s a goofy concept that is one you can pick up and just enjoy. There’s a cuteness and humor to it all, especially seeing the embarrassment that Ivy feels being a part of it all. The team really delivers both in the lyrics, and some subtle jokes, as well as art that delivers the “battle” aspect of the rap. Another excellent chapter showing off how much you can do with Harley Quinn and also when you let your creators have fun.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Juan Ferrerya Letterer: Steve Wands
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: comiXology

There’s Some Digital Comics for Everyone Today at comiXology

ComiXology has five new digital comics for you today including manga, romance, and new DC Digital First. Check out the full list here and the individual issues below!

Dead Mount Death Play #51

Written by Ryohgo Narita
Art by Shinta Fujimoto
Purchase

Surrounded by countless people acting strangely, can Iwanome finally uncover the methods of the elusive Fire-Breathing Bug? Read the next chapter of Dead Mount Death Play the same day as Japan!

Dead Mount Death Play #51

A Marriage Of Rogues

Written by Margaret Moore
Art by Maoko Nagasaki
Purchase

Her father loses their fortune and estate gambling and disappears. The last opponent he lost big to was a nobleman named Develin, and Thea’s father even gambled away her dowry. Thea shows up at Develin’s home and resolutely offers him a deal. “Please marry me.” Can he turn down this sudden proposal? Thea is fraught with unease, but Develin unexpectedly embraces her and steals a kiss. Could they really be together as man and wife, or does a miserable marriage await her?

A Marriage Of Rogues

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red (2020-) #4

Written by Tim Seeley
Pencils Juan Ferreyra
Inks Juan Ferreyra
Colored by Juan Ferreyra
Purchase

“Who Diss?”
The Joker is a master of many things, but one of them is not the mic. When a mythical recording of the Joker’s disastrous rapping turns up as the grand prize in Gotham City’s most elite rap battle tournament, Harley Quinn enters the contest to win this most excellent way to humiliate her awful ex. But who are Gotham’s fiercest rappers? Can Harley Quinn hold her own? The answers will shock you.

Harley Quinn Black + White + Red (2020-) #4

Shazam!: Lightning Strikes #1

Written by Dan Jurgens
Pencils Travis Moore
Inks Travis Moore
Colored by Nick Filardi
Cover by Evan Shaner
Purchase

A class trip to an exhibit on Ancient Egypt goes all wrong when Billy tries to set a bragging classmate straight. Now they’ll have to work together to help a lost spirit find its way home!

Shazam!: Lightning Strikes #1

His Royal Prize Vol. 3: The Devonshire Heirs

Written by Katherine Garbera
Art by Motoko Mori
Purchase

Amelia is what gossip magazines refer to as a “party girl.” She’s always making headlines. In order to call more attention to her foundation’s activities, she purposefully lives a lavishly loud lifestyle. That’s exactly why she’s at this party. When she arrives, a handsome man in a tuxedo comes up to speak with her. He’s Geoff Devonshire, the head of Everest Airlines. Amelia saw him once before when she went on an inspection trip. He immediately asks Amelia for a date, and she’s certain that he’s aware of what sort of rumors follow her. But, for some reason, she can’t get him off her mind…

His Royal Prize Vol. 3: The Devonshire Heirs

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Marc Laming talks about Bloodshot and How it Differs from His Previous Work

Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition

Bloodshot #7 kicks off an action-packed story that basically unleashes hell on Earth as Bloodshot must hunt down monsters, living weapons, and other threats after they’re set loose from a top-secret facility. Written by Tim Seeley, Bloodshot #7 features pencils and inks by Marc Laming and he’ll provide the same for Bloodshot #9, the final chapter of the storyline. A new “Fully Loaded Edition” is on sale August 12 and features 8 bonus pages of content including an interview with co-creator Kevin VanHook.

Marc Laming is a British born artist who has worked on a plethora of characters ranging from Judge Dredd to the Incredible Hulk over a career spanning three decades.

We got a chance to ask Marc a few questions via email about his work on Bloodshot #7 and #9.

Graphic Policy: Hi Marc! How’s tricks?

Marc Laming: Good thank you, I’m keeping good and busy during these difficult times.

GP: With Bloodshot, you’re both pencilling and inking the book. Do you approach the art differently when doing both verses when just penciling?

ML: I haven’t just pencilled a book since the early 2000s when I was working for DC/Vertigo. Since then the market has tended to prefer hiring artists that are self-contained units and I had to learn really quickly to ink my own work so I was happy with the results.

GP: You’ve drawn a large variety of characters over your career. How does drawing Bloodshot differ from others you’ve drawn?

ML: Bloodshot gives you the opportunity to draw so many different things! It covers the obvious action and adventure but there are sci-fi elements across all of the Valiant universe that make it loads of fun and Bloodshot being a very different kind of hero allows for quiet more personal moments too.

GP: Can you take us through your process when you take on a new character?

ML: The writer’s script and the story’s requirements come first and then it is a question of deciding if they are larger than life or something more real world based. Then it is just a question of doing some research based on the script and starting to draw character sheets in my sketch books and on the Cintiq until we are all happy with the look of the new character.

GP: We’ve seen with other artists and publishers that a film can influence the look of a character or comic. Has that factored in at all?

ML: It depends on the project but on Bloodshot I was taking much more inspiration from the incredible work done on the series by artists such as Lewis Larosa, Brett Booth, Paolo Rivera and Dougie Braithwaite than I did on the movie spectacular as it is. 

GP: With Bloodshot #7, you were able to add a lot of nuance to an action packed story by way of Bloodshot and Eidolin’s expressions and body language. I might have forgotten my question… Oh – when it comes to the visual storytelling, do you prefer the subtle moments or the big bombastic ones? 

ML: I like them both but those quiet more tender moments really allow you to put all the emphasis on character and acting in the drawing.

GP: When it comes to drawing locations you may or may not have visited, do you use a lot of visual reference or just kinda wing it?

ML: I use probably much more reference than I really need – In issue nine for example all the buildings and streets in the Russian city are real and you could visit them if you went there. The same of course is true of the London locations including the sewers which were fully researched too!

GP: You’ve worked on Ninjak (with Eternal Warrior) and Archer & Armstrong in the past; what other Valiant character would you like to get your hands on?

ML: I’d love to do a historical Eternal Warrior story and I love the characters from Divinity so any of those would be great to work on in future, oh and Livewire.

GP: What have you got in store for us in the near future after Bloodshot #9? Anything that you can tell us?

ML: I’m currently working on a large graphic novel but that’s all I can say about that right now, but I’m sure I will be shouting about it on my social media soon.

GP: Thank you very much for your time!

Check out an early look at Bloodshot #9!

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