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Exclusive Preview: Bequest #1

BEQUEST #1

Writer: Tim Seeley 
Artist: Freddie E. Williams II 
Colorist: Jeremy Colwell 
Letterer: Marshall Dillon 
Cover: Freddie E. Williams II w/ Jeremy Colwell 
Incentive cover: Tyler Walpole
$4.99 / 32 Pages / Color / On Sale 3.17.2021 

Welcome to the high fantasy world of Tangea! A land where wizards and warriors battle dragons in dark dank dungeons! Where thieves pillage ancient ruins and priests answer the audible words of their great gods! 

Welcome to Chicago, Illinois! Where the magical items from Tangea are being traded on the black market and are messing everything up. 

Now, a group of Tangea adventurers must go undercover in our modern world to stop artifacts and monsters from falling into the wrong hands. But how will they fare in a world without wizards and warriors? A world without heroes? 

From Tim Seeley (DARK RED, BRILLIANT TRASH) and Freddie E. Williams II (HeMan/ThundercatsBatman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) comes BEQUEST, a real-world fantasy tale. 

Each issue of BEQUEST has 24 pages of story and art and cardboard stock covers! 

BEQUEST #1

Preview: Bloodshot #11

BLOODSHOT #11

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by PEDRO ANDREO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by ADELSO CORONA, ANDREW DALHOUSE
Cover B by LEONARDO MANCO
Preorder Variant Cover by BRENT PEEPLES
On Sale February 24th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

“One Last Shot” fires away as Bloodshot and his crew hunt down the resurrected Project Rising Spirit!

Bestselling writer Tim Seeley and rising star Pedro Andreo push the one-man army to a pulse-pounding point of no return.

BLOODSHOT #11

Preview: Batman: Black & White #3

Batman: Black & White #3

Written by: Tim Seeley, Bengal, Nick Dragotta, Bilquis Evely, John Ridley
Art by: Olivier Coipel, Bengal, Nick Dragotta, Bilquis Evely

The mythology of Batman continues to expand in this issue of Batman Black and White as we explore alternate takes and possible futures for the Caped Crusader from the minds of comics’ most innovative and creative thinkers! • Academy Award-winning writer John Ridley and iconic Thor and Avengers artist Olivier Coipel reteam to dip into the world of Future State and expand the legend of the next Batman and introduce us to his new-well, she’s not exactly Robin! • Bilquis Evely, Eisner Award-nominated artist of The Sandman Universe’s The Dreaming and Wonder Woman, writes and draws a tale that takes the myth of Batman to a medieval realm of knights and sorcery. In this vision of Batman, the Dark Knight is a real knight-and he must save a community from a dryad known as Ivy! • Nick Dragotta, co-creator of East of West, makes his DC writing debut with a tale that looks at a post apocalyptic future where a giant Batman-like robot rampages through what’s left of Gotham City. • Celebrated co-writer of Grayson and writer of Nightwing Tim Seeley returns to his horror roots with one of comics’ most legendary Batman and horror artists, Kelley Jones, to show us a Gotham cursed to be forever haunted by Batman! • Bengal, international comics luminary and co-creator of Death or Glory, returns to DC to tell a story expressing Batman’s admiration for his father and how he once protected Gotham City.

Batman: Black & White #3

Exclusive Preview: Bloodshot #11

We have an exclusive first look at Bloodshot #11 from writer Tim Seeley, art by Pedro Andreo, colors by Andrew Dalhouse, and lettering by Dave Sharpe. Covers are by Adelso Corona and Leonardo Manco.

“One Last Shot” fires away as Bloodshot and his crew hunt down the resurrected Project Rising Spirit!

Featuring the appearance of a classic Bloodshot villain

Best-Selling writer Tim Seeley and rising star Pedro Andreo push the one-man army to a pulse-pounding point of no return.

Bloodshot #11 is on sale February 24.

Comicstorian Makes their Comic Writing Debut in Bloodshot #12

It’s time for a team-up. Valiant Entertainment and Benny Potter, aka Comicstorian on YouTube, are joining forces for a backup story in Bloodshot #12, on sale March 10th and available for pre-order right now at a comic shop near you.

For his debut as a comic writer, Benny will do what he does best: Recap Bloodshot’s story! This four-page tale, illustrated by Juan José Ryp, colored by Andrew Dalhouse, and lettered by Dave Sharpe, explores Bloodshot’s journey leading up to the compelling events in Bloodshot Salvation.

Bloodshot #12 is written by Tim Seeley with art by Pedro Andreo, color by Andrew Dalhouse, and lettering by Dave Sharpe. It features covers by Adelso Corona, Jimbo Salgado, and Jim Towe.

Review: Bloodshot #10

Project Rising Spirit is back and a team is coming together to stop them from whatever evil plans they might have.

Bloodshot #10 kicks off “One Last Shot“, a solid starting point for new readers and a new story arc that should have long time fans excited.

Story: Tim Seeley
Art: Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Review: Bloodshot #10

Bloodshot #10

Bloodshot only has “One Last Shot” as the brand-new story arc starts in Bloodshot #10! Artists Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo join writer Tim Seeley for Bloodshot’s road to retribution. Who can a one-man army trust when everyone’s trying to kill him?

The last issue of Bloodshot wasn’t exactly the strongest in the series. Whereas the series has found its strength in the urgency that comes from Tim Seeley’s writing and the speed in which things happen from moment to moment, the last issue suffered from a general lack of cohesiveness as the story (and the character) jumped from location to location in an interesting use of Bloodshot’s abilities that did come across as well as it could have. Otherwise, though, the series has been a breath of excitement borne from the action movie pace of the comic; when it’s good, it’s very good.

Bloodshot #10 introduces comics fans to characters that we’ve seen in the 2020 movie with Wilfred Wigins making his on page debut, and I can’t help but read his lines Lamorne Morris’ voice – something that Seeley captures really well. Wigans’ adds a level of levity to the comic that has been missing (it’s odd, because levity and humour don’t often go hand in hand with Bloodshot, but with Seeley’s style of story telling, the combination actually works a lot better than I’d have expected after previous Bloodshot runs). It’s not all fun and games, though, as we find Bloodshot locked in a place he’ll need to escape from in order to face a new and familiar threat – without going into specifics, the escape sequence is somewhat disturbing in what it doesn’t show you. There’s also a lot of story here; I had to check a couple of times when reading the comic what page I was on, because I was convinced the comic was an oversized book

Seeley is joined by artists Brett Booth and Pedro Andrea, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. Although Booth’s name comes ahead of Andreo’s in the credits, he’s only actually credited with a handful of pages in the comic. The reason I mention this is because Andreo’s work is really good. The Spaniard adds a visual flair to the book that’s a lot like adding parmesan cheese onto a pasta dish; it just makes an already good meal a touch better. His style also flows from the previous issue, which gives the entire series a sense of visual continuity despite having a plethora of talented artists in its ten-issue run. Andreo bolsters a solid story with his layouts and copious use of blank space amongst the action. The sequential art in this book has some spectacular moments amidst a story that slides between good and pretty good with ease.

Bloodshot #10 is a return to the series previous energy and flow, kicking off another arc that should allow new readers to hop into the series with relative ease. What isn’t captured in the recap you can figure out from exposition in the dialogue. A return to form after last issue, which is always good news for any jumping on point.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.2 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: Bloodshot #10

BLOODSHOT #10

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH, PEDRO ANDREO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by SIMON BISLEY
Cover B by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Preorder Variant Cover by SHAWN CRYSTAL
On Sale January 13th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Bloodshot only has “One Last Shot” as the brand-new story arc starts now!

Superstar artist Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo join best-selling scribe Tim Seeley for Bloodshot’s road to retribution.

Who can a one-man army trust when everyone’s trying to kill him?

BLOODSHOT #10

Fantasy Meets Chicago in Bequest from Tim Seeley, Freddie E. Williams II, Jeremy Colwell, and Marshall Dillon

BEQUEST #1

Writer: Tim Seeley
Artist: Freddie E. Williams II
Colorist: Jeremy Colwell
Letterer: Marshall Dillon
Cover: Freddie E. Williams II w/ Jeremy Colwell
Incentive cover: Tyler Walpole
$4.99 / 32 Pages / Color / On Sale 3.17.2021

Welcome to the high fantasy world of Tangea! A land where wizards and warriors battle dragons in dark dank dungeons! Where thieves pillage ancient ruins and priests answer the audible words of their great gods!

Welcome to Chicago, Illinois! Where the magical items from Tangea are being traded on the black market and are messing everything up.

Now, a group of Tangea adventurers must go undercover in our modern world to stop artifacts and monsters from falling into the wrong hands. But how will they fare in a world without wizards and warriors? A world without heroes?

From Tim Seeley (DARK RED, BRILLIANT TRASH) and Freddie E. Williams II (HeMan/ThundercatsBatman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles) comes BEQUEST, a real-world fantasy tale.

Each issue of BEQUEST has 24 pages of story and art and cardboard stock covers!

BEQUEST #1

Review: Twelve Reasons To Die TP

Twelve Reasons to Die

Twelve Reasons to Die acts as the source material for the 2013 concept album of the same title by Wu-Tang Clan member Ghostface Killah, and the record’s producer/composer Adrian Younge and executive producer RZA even get story and writer credits respectively on this comic, which is finally being released as a collected edition.A pre-4 Kids Walk Into A Bank/Marvel Matthew Rosenberg and Patrick Kindlon handle the brunt of the scripting though. The comic is a multi-generational crime saga in the mold of such classics like The Godfather Part II, Goodfellas, and Once Upon A Time in America with a horror spin. With the exception of the final one, each issue tells two parallel stories. The first is about the rise of African-American gangster Tony Starks (One of Ghostface Killah’s aliases.) from muscle for the DeLuca family to a kingpin in his own right, and it is drawn predominantly by artist Breno Tamura. Gus Storms handles the other story which features “crate digger” Michael Migdal looking for 9 rare records for Lucraze, the don of the DeLuca crime family, because he feels like they’re cursed and wants to destroy them.

The parallel structure of Twelve Reasons to Die allows Rosenberg, Kindlon, RZA, Tamura, Storm, colorist Jean-Paul Csuka, and the various guest artists to play with different genres, art styles, and palettes like Younge and Ghostface Killah play with different beats, instrumentation, samples, and deliveries on the album. Starks’ story is a crime saga while Migdal’s story is more horror, and both use elements from the blaxploitation genre. This really shows up in the artwork with Tamura’s work being looser with scratchy inks and Bronze Age era Ben-Day Dots while Storms’ art is softer and more grotesque with the mysterious “Ghostface Killer” lurking around the edges like something out of a bad dream waiting for the needle to drop and to bring vengeance.

The different guest artists, like Nate Powell, Joelle Jones, Edwin Huang, and Riley Rossmo, meld well with Storms and Tamura while bringing extra flair to key scenes like Starks torturing a racist DeLuca made man and framing him for having an affair with the boss’ wife, Logan (Who Starks is actually sleeping with.) or several night club and murder sequences. Csuka’s colors really tie everything together and control the mood of each sequence whether that’s the sleazy red and blue of the strip club where Starks gets his first assignment from the DeLuca (and later runs) to the pop art pink of a “masqua-rave” that Migdal goes to get one of the records from a DJ, who decides to play the record and gets devoured by ravers turned into insects. It’s a Kafka-esque acid trip that shows the decadence of the DeLuca “social club” (They’ve filed off the serial numbers of their criminal enterprises.), and of course, there’s a panel where Migdal vomits.

Twelve Reasons to Die doesn’t shy away from showing the racism that Tony Starks faces from his employers, the Delucas, who bar him from becoming a made man because of the color of his skin and hurl slurs and stereotypes at him throughout the entire comic. Starks gets passed over for the mob equivalent of a promotion even though he has killed, tortured, and general gone above and beyond the call of duty because of the color of his skin. Eventually, this causes him to band together with his colleagues from the Black community to take over the DeLucas’ turf and even have some DeLuca foot soldiers work for him. There’s a dark, cathartic glee to watching him topple an empire in twelve months that had been established 30+ years ago. (See the prologue featuring Mussolini, mainland Italy vs. Sicily, and double page map spreads.) Starks’ ruthlessness is magnetic, yet frightening as he goes from possibly negotiating with one of the DeLuca’s made men to pistol whipping him in an alley and then tying his neck to the back of a car and having him dragged. This comic definitely uses torture creatively a la “Method Man” from Wu-Tang Clan’s classic album, 36 Chambers.

Twelve Reasons to Die

However, Rosenberg, Kindlon, and RZA also take time to develop Tony Starks’ softer and more vulnerable side through his relationship with Logan, who he genuinely cares about and basically uses as a spy for the DeLucas (Although she betrays him because femme fatale trope.) and especially for his love of records. There’s a touching scene where Starks says that his only dream is to get his hands on the most “hype” records, and he uses his organized crime money to build a factory where he can press his own wax. This is why his demise in that same factory is so tragic, and his vengeance via the drop of a needle is so satisfying as the Ghostface Killer slays the men who betrayed him in new and fucked up ways, or just a single page beheading. (I guess that’s pretty messed up though.) The exception is the noble fencer Batiato, who gets an epic sword fight complete with Ghostface in samurai armor and some fun, blocky cartooning from Edwin Huang.

I haven’t really touched much about Migdal in this review, and initially he seems quite distant from sex, violence, and racism-tinged world of Tony Starks and the DeLucas. He’s just a guy with a sarcastic sense of humor, who you’d see digging through the crates at your local record store, probably every day. However, as he continues to be treated like shit by the aging DeLuca crime bosses and see more horrific things, Migdal seems more attuned to this grindhouse movie of a world even though he doesn’t lose his innocence making the high energy Chris Hunt-drawn finale have a tinge of sadness. He really just wants to get paid so he can buy more records.

Even though it has an entire restaurant of chefs in its proverbial kitchen, Twelve Reasons to Die is a damn good fusion of the crime and horror genre with a charismatic protagonist and a social conscience in the midst of all the schlock. However, it never gets preachy. For three decades, Ghostface Killah has been one of hip hop’s best storytellers, and his vision translates really well to the comic book page thanks to Matthew Rosenberg, Patrick Kindlon, RZA, Breno Tamura, Gus Storms, Chris Hunt, Jean-Paul Csuka, and the guest artists that are the visual equivalent of that perfect drum sound or soul sample that raises a track from skippable to total earworm. Finally, and it goes without saying, but this comic pairs really well with the 12 Reasons to Die album.

Story: Ghostface Killah, Adrian Younge, C.E. Garcia
Story/Script: Matthew Rosenberg, Patrick Kindlon with RZA

Art: Breno Tamura, Gus Storms, Chris Hunt
Guest Art: Kyle Strahm, Joe Infurnari, Tim Seeley, Nate Powell,
Tyler Crook, Toby Cypress, Joelle Jones, Edwin Huang, Russell Roehling,
Ryan Kelly, Riley Rossmo Colors: Jean-Paul Csuka
Letters: Jim Campbell and Nic J. Shaw
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.4 Recommendation: Buy

Black Mask Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: AmazoncomiXology

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