Tag Archives: the sheriff of babylon

Wednesday Graphic Novel Review (Special Edition): The Sheriff of Babylon: Pow. Pow. Pow.

The celebrated series The Sheriff of Babylon by Tom King and Mitch Gerads continues and follows a Florida cop turned military consultant. Chris came to Iraq in the aftermath of the 2003 American invasion to train a new generation of post-Saddam police. But the murder of one of his recruits has uncovered a vast web of secrets and lies—one that ties the old regime, the new government, the American military, the criminal underworld and the jihadist network together in a nightmarish tangle of death and deception.

Fortunately, Chris isn’t cutting through the chaos alone. Old-school Baghdad cop Nassir and political power player Sofia each have their own reasons to see the murderer brought to justice. Together, the trio has tracked down the man responsible: the lethal insurgent commander Abu Rahim.

Now, as the investigation builds to its explosive climax and their diverging agendas begin to pull them apart, Chris, Nassir and Sofia are about to discover that nothing about the murder, the mastermind or the men behind the scenes is truly as it seems.

You can get The Sheriff of Babylon: Pow. Pow. Pow. in stores February 1 and bookstores February 7.

Get your copies now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

The Sheriff of Babylon: Pow. Pow. Pow. Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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The Best Comics of 2016 – Brett’s List

It’s the first day of a new year and so that means I’m posting my “best of” listing of the top comic books for 2016. Generally these are comic books that came out in 2016, though some are from earlier times and I got around to reading them, or limited series that continued. Keep in mind, this is what I have read (and does not reflect what other contributors to this site might think, they’ll hopefully have their own lists). If it’s not on here, I just might not have read it.

This was a particularly tough year of choices with some categories easily having their own top ten or twenty-five and some I struggled to even come up with one. 2016 was a year that ongoing, maxi-series, and limited floppies seemed to blend more and more and for me as a reader I found myself shifting away from one publisher to another and as a whole enjoying graphic novels and indie comics a hell of a lot more than I have in the past.

What stood out to me? Check out below what made the cut!

Best Super Hero Comic – The Paybacks

the-paybacks-3A new publisher, but still absolutely amazing. The Paybacks by Donny Cates, Eliot Rahal, Geoff Shaw moved from Dark Horse to Heavy Metal for its second volume, but it didn’t lose any steam in doing so continuing to deliver hilarity and upping the action.

The concept of the comic is that there’s a repo crew who have to deal with all the superheroes who can’t pay back the loans they take for all of their fancy gadgets. To pay off their debts those heroes then join the ragtag team.

A send-up of so many familiar characters and lets face it creators too, the comic has more jokes in each panel than some series have their entire run. It’s funny, action packed, and in this volume actually is somewhat timely with news with a focus on a data breach.

My biggest wish in comics for 2017 is someone is smart enough to invest in this series because I know it’ll pay off in the log run. Everyone who I’ve turned on to it falls in love and whole there were some issues with the second volume, it still is the one “superhero” comic I devoured as soon as possible.

Runners Up:

  • COPRA – There’s some arguments to be made that Michel Fiffe‘s indie series about a group of raftag characters should be the top pick, and there was long thought about if it should, it’s that good. Out of all of the series I read this year, this is one that delivered with every single issue. This is a comic that shows that superheroes aren’t the domain of just two companies anymore, especially due to how many issues have been released. I said this exact same thing in 2015 and it applies here.
  • The Legend of Wonder Woman – An absolutely brilliant max-series that went from digital to print. Renae De Liz and Ray Dillon delivered a Wonder Woman story that stands out in a year of solid Wonder Woman output. Fun to read. Beautiful to look at. Unfortunately, it looks like we’ll just get this one volume.
  • The Omega Men – Writer Tom King took this ragtag group of characters and has given us a maxiseries that explores revolution/terrorism in so many ways. This is one to read once collected and the ruminate on. It began in 2015 but wrapped up in 2016.
  • Tomboy – This series published by Action Lab: Danger Zone and by M. Goodwin is a comic that’s not on enough people’s radar. A mix of manga, Japanese horror, western vigilante stories, it’s a strange, creepy, haunting series featuring a teenage girl out for revenge against the people who killed her friend.

 

Best Non-Super Hero Comic – The Sheriff of Babylon

the-sheriff-of-babylon-12-coverI said above that 2016 was the year of Tom King, and guess who wrote this one! Tom King! The Sheriff of Babylon is another max-series that wrapped up, but we’ll get a second volume some time in 2017.

The comic is based on King’s experiences working for the CIA in Iraq taking place in the Green Zone after the recent Iraq war. The comic is brutally honest showing a world where there’s so little right and so much wrong and it all comes together in a muddied brown and gray.

That dirtiness of it all is helped by Mitch Gerads‘ art and the smart use of colors. The detail, every body movement, the framing of the panels, Gerads’ art adds so much to every issue. That’s saying something considering how amazing King’s scripts are!

This is a comic series that shows comics are political and can question the world we currently live.

Runners Ups:

  • Descender- Jeff Lemire has had a hell of year in general in comics and is one of my favorite writers of the year. This series features the stunning art of Dustin Nguyen. The sci-fi series is so hard to describe revolving around an android that looks like a little boy. Every issue is a treat to read, and Nguyen’s art helps with beautiful visuals. Seriously the art alone is a reason to pick up the series. We didn’t get an issue every month, but what we did get was fantastic.
  • The Fix – Two fuck up cops who are corrupt and get mixed up in a drug smuggling scam. The comic is absolutely hilarious. Written by Nick Spencer with art by Steve Lieber the comic is one of the funniest books on the market.
  • The Flintstones – Written by Mark Russell this series is some of the smartest and subtle political and social commentary in any writing going on today. The comic covers everything from religion to consumerism to the 2016 election. And like his writing in Prez no one is safe, the right and the left are equal fodder. Entertaining, smart, and elevating the classic characters to a whole new level.
  • Invisible Republic – A reporter investigates the truth of an uprising on a planet discovering fact from fiction in a series that bounces back and forth between the past and present. Each issue reminds us about the power of journalism and the need for good reporting. Myth can easily be twisted into fact and lies can replace reality. The comic series seems prescient in so many ways.

 

Best Limited Series or One Shot – 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank

4 KIDS WALK INTO A BANK #1 CoverWe got three issues of this series in 2016 and holy crap do I wish we got more. In those three issues we did get some of the best storytelling in any comics. I’m assuming this is a limited series since it is a “crime caper in five parts” but hopefully we get more after this volume wraps up.

The series involves a bunch of kids that find out one of their dads is possibly a criminal and has some buddies who plan to rob a bank. Their idea is to rob the bank before them.

But, it’s not the heist that’s the drawn it’s the kids themselves. Each one feels so real with so many quirks their personalities jump off the page. Everyone is relatable and each feels like real people we knew growing up. It’s absolutely amazing.

The art by Tyler Boss is top notch and the writing is why Matthew Rosenberg is one of the hottest writers in comics right now.

More please!

Runners Up:

  • Black – This series was a Kickstarter phenomenon and the concept is what if only Black people had superpowers? Political. Daring. In your face. The comic is layered and will leave you debating what it’s trying to say.
  • Love is Love – A charity comic to benefit the victims of the Pulse nightclub attack, this comic is a prime example of what the comic industry can do when profits aren’t at the forefront. Bringing together publishers and hundreds of creators it’s a touching tribute.
  • Refugees Book One – A hell of a find at Small Press Expo, the comic is haunting taking us into the world of refugees as they attempt to find a better life. There’s definite issues with the comic as far as some of the writing, but the message is clear and brutally honest.
  • Superman: American Alien – Featuring a bunch of different artists, this maxi-series by writer Max Landis explored a different time in Superman’s life with a different take on the character. It’s a fun and fantastic read and somehow actually gives us something that feels fresh for a character that’s been around for over 75 years.

 

Best Graphic Novel/Trade Paperback – March Book Three

MarchBookThree-CoverThe best thing to be released in 2016 for comics. This is an absolutely amazing finish to the award winning trilogy. The winner of the National Book Award among other things the graphic novel focuses on Congressman John Lewis’ experiences during the Civil Rights movement.

Written by Lewis, Andrew Aydin, with art by Nate Powell this is the crown jewel of comics showing that they’re more than tights and has been adopted by schools to teach about this time in American history.

As I read the graphic novel from cover to cover, I found myself filled with emotions, as Lewis’ life was there in print for those to see and read. The story is a complicated one, but it’s presented in a way that feels honest and open, both good and bad. This is an inside look at one of the most important, and turbulent times in American history from not just someone that was there, but a leader of the movement. And that’s a fascinating part of this third book, is its focus on Lewis’ role as a leader.

This third volume somehow leapfrogs the other two. Whether it’s due to learning or the material within, something about it created an emotional reaction I haven’t felt by any media in quite some time. And most importantly it got me to think about where we as a people and nation have been, where we are, and where we’re going.

Runners Up:

  • The Attack – A man’s wife winds up being a suicide bomber. This story is about his attempt to find out why and discovering he knew so little about the woman he called his wife. A spiral into despair and madness the end will leave you speechless and heartbroken.
  • Rolling Blackouts: Dispatches From Turkey, Syria, and Iraq – By Sarah Glidden this graphic novel is her experiences as she researches potential stories on the effects of the Iraq War on the Middle East, especially refugees. Beautiful to look at, the graphic novel is the second best thing I’ve read this year (behind March).
  • Soviet Daughter – Adapting her great grandmother’s journal Julia Alekseyeva provides an interesting look at someone who lived in Russia from 1910 to emigrating to the US in the 90s. The Revolution, WWII, the Holocaust, it’s all presented as Alekseyeva illustrates what is a diary. Between each chapter, Julia reflects on her own life and her closeness with her great grandmother. It’s an amazing piece examining women finding their place in the world. It’s also a reason you wait until the first of the year for your list, as this came out the last week of the year.
  • Tetris: The Games People PlayBox Brown takes what should be a boring story about the history of the video game Tetris and makes it really interesting! A fun graphic novel published by First Second that makes corporate maneuvering a bad business deals engaging.

 

Best Genre of the Year – Indie Comics/Small Publishers

Is it a “genre”? We can argue about that, but lets face it, 2016 was a year we saw major creators continue to shrug off the big two, instead launching creator-owned series at other publishers, digitally or through Kickstarter. We saw more comics, in more varieties, on more subjects and more ways to consume them, than any time before. It really wasn’t the year of the Big Two, this was a year that we as consumers could continue to find something that would fit our varied tastes.

With more channels for distribution and more ways to produce comics, we’re in a golden age where the old ways of publishing no longer hold back the creativity that abounds.

I named Indie Comics “it” in 2013, 2014, and 2015 and nothing changed in 2016. There’s a massive opening for someone to step in and be a mainstream breakout, maybe 2017 will be the year we see it.

 

Best Surprise of the Year – DC Comics

DC_Logo_RGB_0318162016 was a year that had everyone shaking their head when they heard DC was shaking things up again and “rebooting.” Except, their reboot was anything but.

In “Rebirth” the publisher blended the old with the new bringing back legacy characters and also pushing forward some of the newer ones too. They even moved away from grimm and gritty and gave us a bit of hope and fun in it all!

While Batman has always been strong for the company, Superman, Wonder Woman, and more all all returned to greatness with a new positive energy about them that could be felt.

But even better, sales increased and while they’ve leveled off and dropped quite a bit from the initial launch, the publisher is stronger and in a better position than it has been in a long time.

The company continued to expand upon its digital first program, and has begun to look towards expanding its market with its DC Super Hero Girls line.

They also did this as their movie output was mixed and television output strong. Now to get everything to line-up and the DC brand as a whole could be unstoppable.

The dots are all there, now we’ll see if the company has the vision to connect them all.

 

Biggest Disappointment of the Year – Kickstarter

KickstarterLast year’s disappointment continued to be so, as projects were delayed, vapor ware, or not as advertised. Also add in issues on the creator end of folks pledging high amounts and then disputing the charges, at times getting the goods. Add in the platform’s unwillingness to step in to deal with either situation and you get a tech company showing off it’s greed. What was once the toast of the town has shown its cracks which will only get worse.

The crowdfunding platform became a way for creators to raise funds for projects, only to get picked up by publishers, at times delaying projects and leaving bad tastes in the mouths of fans. If all creators were held to the standards of some of the best users of the system, there’d be no issue, but over 90% of the projects I’ve pledged to have been delayed or non-existent only creating angry backers and fans.

These issues have lead this site to rethink what we promote and how we do so, no longer choosing comics to promote, as we feel some responsibility for things gone wrong and your dollars being held hostage.

Kickstarter continues to be tone-deaf, and it’s only a matter of time before someone stands up and challenges the platform with a system that’s fair to creators, and protects those who pledge.

Oh how the mighty continue to fall.

 

Publisher of the Year – None of the Above

This one I’ve thought about the most out of all of the categories on the list. I keep going back and forth between Image, BOOM! Studios, Valiant, Action Lab, IDW, First Second, and so many more. For each strength one brings to the table, they also have major weaknesses. Whether it’s a focus on a genre, pigeonholing themselves with adults, failure in digital, a mix of quality of comics, none of them are at least good everywhere. But, the comic industry has really grown in 2016 with no one breaking out as THE publisher to rival the big two. Partially that’s because so many have stood out with some of what they’ve done, but none have stood out for their whole.

Of the big two Marvel has stumbled… a lot. Entire articles can be written in that department, but the company is not the juggernaut its been in quite some time and I’d expect their to be some big shake-ups in 2017.

DC on the other hand came really close to being named for this. They’ve done some amazing stuff in the year with Rebirth being a smash hit. There’s still something slightly off, but out of every publisher, they’ve gotten most improved.

Image has become of the home of amazing indie comics by big name creators, but they generally lack a kids line that gets the next generation of readers and the sales just aren’t their in floppies. BOOM! has had a great mix of comics, but they’re missing that ongoing series that goes on for 30 to 50 issues. Valiant is quality all around and have tried some interesting market tactics, but you have to like superhero comics, Action Lab is a solid up and comer with good consistent releases. IDW has shown its possible to do great licensed comics, while First Second has fantastic graphic novels of all sorts. Aftershock has quality and so has Black Mak Studios.

Out of all of that, where’s the standout above everyone else? They’re all good in their own ways, but each have some flaws, with some of those flaws being pretty big. After a lot of deliberation, I couldn’t decide on one, so I chose none.

Each publisher is close to going huge, it’s just taking someone to connect those dots. Or maybe no one will, and it’ll be up to the individual creators to fill up the gap.

Preview: The Sheriff of Babylon #12

The Sheriff of Babylon #12

Written by: Tom King
Art by: Mitch Gerads
Cover by: John Paul Leon

Chris, Sofia and Nassir have pursued Abu Rahim, navigated complicated red tape, run afoul of some very bad men and so far have managed to make it to the other side. So far. It’s taken a year and 12 issues to get here, but this is everything we’ve been building toward.

shrfbab_cv12

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

southernbastards15_coverartaWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: The Unworthy Thor #1 (Marvel) – Odinson returns, and he’s not worthy! I’ll skip my hopes for a Wayne’s World crossover and instead remind everyone they should be reading The Mighty Thor. While I watch people argue over whether a woman should be Thor or not, I’m reading one hell of a tale being penned by Jason Aaron who is also doing this book. Going all the way back to Original Sin, Thor, and then The Mighty Thor, Aaron has been building us up to this point and it is finally here!

Southern Bastards #15 (Image) – I am so excited for this series returning, and yes this is the second Jason Aaron book on my list. You should get Southern Bastards in trade if you haven’t or get the single issues if you can because I cannot wait to see where this story is going to go. It’s violent, it’s dark, it’s corrupt, it’s infuriating, and I love every minute of it. Boss BBQ not included with this book.

The Wicked + The Divine #23 (Image) – Another one of my favorite series returns. After the enjoyable one shot that showed some of the Pantheon from years past, we finally return to our current group. That last issue was pretty crazy. I’m excited to see how things pan out for our pop star gods. Also it’s Gillen and McKelvie. Nuff said.

Batman #10 (DC Comics) – “I Am Suicide” continues and I’m excited to see what Tom King does with the interesting team that Batman set up last issue. We also get the man who broke the Dark Knight’s back, Bane as he works with Psycho Pirate. Will we get another classic battle between Bats and Bane? I hope so! Either way, I’m always excited for Batman.

Nightwing #8 (DC Comics) – This run of Nightwing has been a pleasant surprise for me since it started. Seeley really needs to be applauded for his work on this book. The last issue sets up something very big, and thank god for the two week releases because we get to quickly see what Raptor is up to. This is one of my favorite Rebirth titles.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Faith #5 (Valiant) – Almost any given week you’ll see a Valiant comic here, and this is no exception. Faith is one of my favourite series being published right now and this issue sees the debut of the fantastic Meghan Hetrick on art, making this probably my most anticipated comic this week.

Batman #10 (DC Comics) – Batman has to infiltrate a prison. Santa Prisca prison, where Bane makes his home. This could be fantastic.

Cryptocracy #5 (Dark Horse) – The super secret government that we never knew about is slowly (and publicly) unraveling. One family’s top agent is trying to stop that, but keeps running up against creatures that were previously just urban legends… this series is far from your traditional superhero type of story, and has really surprised me so far.

Green Lanterns #10 (DC Comics) – This is probably my favourite book that DC are publishing right now, in part because of the chemistry between the two leads, but also because of how easy it is to fall into the story because if, like me, you’re new to the world of the Green Lanterns, then you can figure out what their all about with the universe’s two newest Lanterns.

The Unworthy Thor #1 (Marvel) – I’ve always been a sucker for redemption stories, so a six issue story about (hopefully) that is going to be intriguing. While I hope that Jane Foster remains Thor for a little longer, I’m not surprised to see the Odinson on a quest for a different Mjolnir – I only hope that he doesn’t end up with his old hammer.

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Sheriff of Babylon #12 (Vertigo) – This is it. Everything comes together (hopefully) in Tom King and Mitch Gerad’s series about a murder in Iraq during the American occupation. The series has been a gripping read and possibly one of the most brutally honest takes on the US occupation. Easily one of the best comics on the shelves this week.

Bitch Planet #9 (Image Comics) – After a break, the series is back and it continues to mix entertainment with politics in one of th best comic series out there.

Muhammad Ali (Dark Horse) – A graphic novel biography about one of the great athletes and icons of all time? Yes please!

Occupy Avengers #1 (Marvel) – David Walker takes on this new team which seems rather interesting. But, so many years after the Occupy movement, is it relevant? We’ll see!

Southern Bastards #1 (Image Comics) – One of the best comics returns. This Southern noir look at racism, football, and small town politics, is absolutely amazing. So happy it’s back.

Preview: The Sheriff of Babylon #11

The Sheriff of Babylon #11

Art by: Mitch Gerads
Cover by: John Paul Leon
Written by: Tom King

Sofia’s meeting with the man who attacked her has taken a dangerous turn, and what was supposed to be a simple covert action has transformed into a full-blown firefight. If the battle is successful, it will put Nassir in the clear, but it could also tear the friendship between Sofia and Chris apart.

shrfbab_cv11

Review: The Sheriff of Babylon #11

shrfbab_cv11Sofia’s meeting with the man who attacked her has taken a dangerous turn, and what was supposed to be a simple covert action has transformed into a full-blown firefight. If the battle is successful, it will put Nassir in the clear, but it could also tear the friendship between Sofia and Chris apart.

The Sheriff of Babylon begins to wrap up this volume as all the pieces of the puzzle finally come together and it’s clear that when it comes down to it, everyone here has their hands dirty.

Written by Tom King, this issue feels like a real-time play as the various pieces on the chess board have their interactions with each other. Revelations are made and sins are admitted to. And what’s more impressive than King’s David Mamet-like story is that it all builds into this emotional climax where you have no idea what will happen.

As the issue progresses the tension increases until we get to the end that had me immediately wanting to read the next issue to see what happens. I need to know!

The art by Mitch Gerads is impressive in that this is an issue where there’s not a lot of action and many of the pages feature nine panels each focused on one character. I mention that because each of those panels often focus on one character with maybe another reacting in the back. That focus on a single character’s framed face means that the art has to signal the emotion as much as the writing, and Gerads pulls that off and then some. I’ve said it before, but Gerads art continues to tell as much of the story as King’s art.

The Sheriff of Babylon #11 continues the streak of a series which is honestly brutal about real world issues. It might be one of the most interesting look at the Iraqi occupation and I’m sure when it’s all wrapped up this will be a series that’s examined for the story it tells and the real world it reflects.

Story: Tom King Art: Mitch Gerads Cover Art: John Paul Leon
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: The Sheriff of Babylon #10

The Sheriff of Babylon #10

Written by: Tom King
Art by: Mitch Gerads
Cover by: John Paul Leon

Deals with the devil rarely go right, but in Baghdad, the wrong deal could get lots of people killed. Just as Sofia gets close to Abu Rahim, the man who killed Chris’ trainee and blew up her car, Chris starts to suspect Bob, the man who led them to Abu Rahim, isn’t exactly trustworthy himself.

shrfbab_cv10

Review: The Sheriff of Babylon #10

shrfbab_cv10Deals with the devil rarely go right, but in Baghdad, the wrong deal could get lots of people killed. Just as Sofia gets close to Abu Rahim, the man who killed Chris’ trainee and blew up her car, Chris starts to suspect Bob, the man who led them to Abu Rahim, isn’t exactly trustworthy himself.

What I consider to be one of the best comics in the market right now continues to deliver. The Sheriff of Babylon #10 is a tense play on comic page as the issue primarily plays out in two locations with some flashbacks to fill in what has happened to get to this point.

The issue partially is focused on Sofia and Abu Rahim as they go back and forth about the fall of Saddam and the American occupation reminiscing about the past in a chess match of words that sees it’s tension rise throughout. That tension is partially driven by Rahim who is strapped with a suicide vest that you don’t know if he’ll use it.

But, for me what’s most interesting is writer Tom King’s focus on Chris and Bob who also play a game of their own. Bob in his arrogance reveals a lot of info to Chris and we get to see even more in how we got to where we are, and with it some of the inherent racism that goes along with the war in Iraq and against terrorism. I don’t want to reveal the specifics but it’s an interesting pivot where the imagery says so much about the characters and their beliefs.

That imagery is courtesy of Mitch Gerads whose art continues to be amazing. King’s writing is fantastic, but Gerads adds so much detail in every panel, from what people are wearing or holding to the angle of their head. It all adds up to create a rich story through visuals.

What is the end game for every one? We have just a few more issues to go to find out in what is not just one of the best comics on the market, but also one of the best discussions of the US occupation of Iraq from someone that was there.

Story: Tom King Art: Mich Gerads
Story: 9 Art: 9 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Vertigo provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

angelcatbird.0Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: A&A: The Aventures Of Archer And Armstrong #7 (Valiant) – The last issue was one of the better ones I’ve read in this series, which is saying a lot when it comes to A&A’s quality.  I’m remarkably excited to get my grubby mitts on this issue.

Angel Catbird Vol.1 (Dark Horse) – The early reviews I’ve read have been very good, which is awesome. Other than the cover and the preview text, I know next to nothing about the TPb other than it’s apparently very good. Sometimes, that’s the only reason you need to read something.

Batman #6 (DC Comics) – Another week, another Batman comic. Strangely, the twice-monthly shipping isn’t bothering me as much as I thought it would… probably because Tom King and David Finch are still going very strong right now.

Moon Knight #6 (Marvel) – I think I must be one of the very few people for whom this series isn’t clicking for. I recognise it’s good, but I’ve been picking it up primarily because of the art, not the quality of the story. But I have faith in Jeff Lemire, and I’ve also found the series has been getting better issue by issue. At some point, the series is going to click for me, and I’m really hoping its here.

Ninjak #19 (Valiant) – Ninjak’s team up with the Eternal Warrior continues here, and it’s a safe bet that any comic featuring the Eternal Warrior will be on my pull list – this comic is no exception. Although not quite as good as Wrath of the Eternal Warrior, this story is only one issue in.

 

Anthony

Glitterbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Jim Zub has been part of a slew of excellent titles throughout his career, including the current ongoing at Image, Wayward. Glitterbomb looks to be another intriguing concept from Zub with newcomer artist Djibril Morissette-Phan. The premise looks to attack celebrity culture and fame with a twist of horror and violence. Morissette-Phan, whose previewed art, with the colours of K. Michael Russell, makes this series look even more intriguing and gritty.Kill or Be Killed #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue contained some rather unexpected moments for a series that appeared to be purely grounded in reality. The creative team of Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser are no strangers to implementing supernatural elements (see the fantastic Fatale). Dylan is the front and

Kill or Be Killed #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue contained some rather unexpected moments for a series that appeared to be purely grounded in reality. The creative team of Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser are no strangers to implementing supernatural elements (see the fantastic Fatale). Dylan is the front and center vigilante-esque protagonist whose agenda to kill those deemed as scum of the Earth is initiated by a mysterious demon after a failed suicide attempt. It’s too early to tell whether this is more of a projection of the mindset of Dylan or a full on horror element part of the story. Either way, this looks to be another hit title for a team that continues to impress.

Paper Girls #9 (Image Comics) – With another Erin (whom may or may not be one to trust according to the last issue) thrown into the mix, things are getting pretty hectic in the present time. Oh, and there are some gigantic monsters fighting amidst the city.

A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #7 (Valiant) – Archer and Armstrong have found themselves amongst a circus troupe of Armstrong doppelgangers as the duo continue their journey to find the immortal’s long-lost wife. A&A continues to be one of the funniest and more entertaining comics on the stands that never fails to be filled with laugh out loud moments.

Kim and Kim #2 (Black Mask Studios) – The first issue of Kim and Kim introduced an energetic and colourful world centered around bounty hunters Kimiko Quatro and Kimber Dantzler. They have propelled themselves forward into the midst of a pretty heavy situation involving a particular bounty that looks to be the driving force for Kim and Kim. With a real punk aesthetic and

 

Shay

This is a damn good week for comic book lovers. Whether you’re into the big boys of DC and Marvel , or the mini majors with an indie edge like Image. It’s about time to get your geek on!

Top Pick: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #1 (Vertigo) – Full disclosure, I am such a Fables fan that I have a tattoo of the cover of issue #7 on my arm. Of course, I’m hella hyped for something new from the geniuses behind the Fables brand. Here’s to more bad ass ladies, shifty bad guys and what I’m sure will be a fun ride. Philip Willingham himself recommends it and it’s from The Wolf Among Us creators.

Rise of the Black Flame #1 (Dark Horse) – There’s a cult, missing girls, the jungle of Siam! It sounds like an adventure mystery that will give you chills!

Batman Arkham: Poison Ivy TP (DC Comics) – All of Poison Ivy’s ( aka Red) greatest hits and fights against Batman in one place. Who doesn’t like a little female bad assery ?

Color Your Own Women of Power (Marvel) – It’s a fun time and a coloring book for fans. You can now color in ( or out of ) the lines and make your own fantasy costumes for your fave lady superheroes. What’s not to love about the chance to put something functional on your faves?

Glitterbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Looks like it has some promise. Dark forces beyond our control hell bent on tearing down celebrity culture and beauty. Should be a fun read and an interesting series of it plays its cards right and shows us the ugly behind the beauty.

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Sheriff of Babylon #10 (Vertigo) – Hands down the best comic out there right now. It’s entertaining, but also a brutal and honest look at life in Iraq post war. Writer Tom King gives a visceral feel to each issue and artist Mitch Gerads’ art is absolutely amazing in its detail.

Cyborg: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – A new creative team takes on Cyborg and I’m really intrigued to see where writer John Semper Jr. takes the character.

Supergirl #1 (DC Comics) – I really enjoyed writer Steve Orlando’s take on the character in his Rebirth issue. He’s clearly focused on the teenage and immigrant aspects of the character and making sure it’s all fun too.

Alters #1 (Aftershock Comics) – I’m intrigued on this one which sees a world where people are changing by gaining powers, but also a new hero is transitioning from male to female at the same time as gaining powers. I hold my breathe hoping this one is a story featuring a transgender character done right, but who knows.

Eclipse #1 (Image Comics) – An interesting concept of a world where sunlight kills people so the survivors are forced to live in nocturnal cities and someone begins to use it as a weapon for murder. Sounds original and intriguing.

 

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