Tag Archives: the shadow

The Shadow #1 Jae Lee Remark, Out Now

THE SHADOW #1 JAE LEE REMARK

writer: Garth Ennis
artist: Aaron Campbell
cover: Jae Lee Original Remark
32 pages | Intro: $193.10

Remarked by artist Jae Lee!

1938: The Shadow returns in a tale of blazing action and deadly intrigue, as a night of carnage on the New York waterfront plunges the mysterious vigilante into a conspiracy involving the fate of the world itself. As storm clouds gather across the globe, American Military Intelligence meets with a certain Lamont Cranston, determined to beat a host of spies and assassins to the greatest prize of all… but what that might be, only the Shadow knows.

The Shadow #1 Alex Ross Remark, Out Now

THE SHADOW #1 ALEX ROSS REMARK

writer: Garth Ennis
artist: Aaron Campbell
cover: Alex Ross Original Remark
32 pages | Intro: $499.99

Remarked by artist Alex Ross!

1938: The Shadow returns in a tale of blazing action and deadly intrigue, as a night of carnage on the New York waterfront plunges the mysterious vigilante into a conspiracy involving the fate of the world itself. As storm clouds gather across the globe, American Military Intelligence meets with a certain Lamont Cranston, determined to beat a host of spies and assassins to the greatest prize of all… but what that might be, only the Shadow knows.

Preview: The Shadow Vol. 3 #6

The Shadow Vol. 3 #6

writers: Si Spurrier, Dan Watters
artist: Daniel HDR, Ricardo Jaime
covers: Kelley Jones (A), Tom Mandrake (B), J Bone (C)
J Bone (RI-B/W), Kelley Jones (RI-Virgin), Tom Mandrake (RI-B/W), Kelley Jones (RI-B/W)
FC | 32 pages | $3.99 | Teen+

With the machinations of Leviathan laid bare at last, the streets run with blood. At the center of it all, face to face with the sickness of the world, Mary Jerez must decide whether to use the scalpel’s cut to cure or kill. Will the coming dawn bring the light—or the Shadow?

Preview: The Shadow #5

The Shadow #5

writer: Si Spurrier, Dan Watters
artist: Daniel HDR, Ricardo Jaime
covers: Tyler Kirkham (A), Michael Kaluta (B), Kelley Jones (C)
Tyler Kirkham (RI-B/W), Michael Kaluta (RI-Virgin), Kelley Jones (RI-B/W), Michaell Kaluta (RI-B/W)
FC | 32 pages | $3.99 | Teen+

Laid bare in its many limbed writhings, Mary Jerez is horrified to learn the true meaning of Leviathan. And as the blood of his long faithful agents begins to spill, the Shadow may be forced to admit that perhaps- just perhaps- he no longer knows…

Preview: The Shadow Vol. 3 #4

The Shadow Vol. 3 #4

writer: Si Spurrier, Dan Watters
artist: Ricardo Jaime
covers: Lee Weeks (A), Kelly Jones (B), Tom Mandrake (C)
Kelly Jones (RI-B/W), Tom Mandrake (RI-B/W), Lee Weeks (RI-Virgin), Kelly Jones (RI-Virgin)
FC | 32 pages | $3.99 | Teen +

When violence strikes close to home, Mary Jerez is faced with a deadly decision that may change her life forever. Meanwhile, those who would seek to use the legend for their own means begin to learn why they should fear the shadows.

Preview: The Shadow Vol. 3 #3

The Shadow Vol. 3 #3

writers: Si Spurrier, Dan Watters
artist: Daniel HDR
covers: Tyler Kirkham (A), Michael Kaluta (B), Charles Wilson III (C)
Michael Kaluta (RI-Virgin), Charles Wilson III (RI-B/W), Tyler Kirkham (RI-B/W), Michael Kaluta (RI-B/W)
FC | 32 pages | $3.99 | Teen +

With political tensions on the rise and lethal copycats committing acts of terror in his name, Mary Jerez grasps at secrets that she believes may be key to returning the Shadow’s mind. In doing so she must delve into the war-torn ravages of his past, where she will be confronted with the sins that lurk in the heart of The Shadow himself.

Preview: The Shadow Vol. 3 #2

The Shadow Vol. 3 #2

writers: Si Spurrier, Dan Watters
artist: Daniel HDR
covers: Tyler Kirkham (A), Michael Kaluta (B), Tommy Lee Edwards (C)
Michael Kaluta (RI-Virgin), Tommy Lee Edwards (RI-B/W), Tyler Kirkham (RI-B/W), Michael Kaluta (RI-B/W)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen +

The circumstances that led Mary’s mysterious burn patient to her hospital are becoming clearer – but is this horribly hurt man really the Shadow? And what is his connection with the millionaire Worthy Delaney, an advisor to the newly elected President Wyatt? Meanwhile, Mary and her sister Luisa begin an investigation of their own into a Shadow fan-site – because if the information there lets people make the connection with her patient, the Shadow is in grave danger!

Preview: The Shadow Vol. 3 #1

The Shadow Vol. 3 #1

writer: Si Spurrier & Dan Watters
artist: Daniel HDR
covers: Kenneth Rocafort (A), Michael Kaluta (B), Brandon Peterson (C), Neal Adams (D), Tyler Kirkham (E-Sub), Michael Kaluta (RI-B/W), Brandon Peterson (RI-B/W), Neal Adams (RI-B/W), Tyler Kirkham (RI-B/W), Michael Kaluta (RI-Virgin)
FC • 32 pages • $3.99 • Teen +

For the better part of a century the Shadow’s sinister laughter brought the chill of fear to evil-doers – but in our modern times, the streets of Manhattan have gone largely silent. But he is not forgotten. Not by the people he’s saved. Mary Jerez, is one of those people. The Shadow saved her from a horrifying school shooting – Mary knows all too well what evil lurks in the hearts of men.

So when a horribly burnt man – incredibly strong and fierce, despite his terrible injuries— arrives under her care as a resident at the hospital – she believes she knows who he is, too. Is this mysterious man actually the Shadow – and with Mary’s help, will evil-doers again know what it means to fear his terrible justice?

Si Spurrier (X-Force, X-Men: Legacy, Judge Dredd) and Daniel HDR (Superman, Cyborg) bring the pulp icon into modern day in a tale full of deadly intrigue, gun-blazing action, and a study of the nature of evil!

Review: Batman/The Shadow #2

The combination crossover/murder mystery/exploration of Batman’s debt to The Shadow in pop culture continues in Batman/The Shadow #2. The big reveal in the previous is that Henri Ducard, Batman’s mentor and Liam Neeson’s character in Batman Begins, was one of many civilian identities that The Shadow took on to strike out at evil. Artist Riley Rossmo and colorist Ivan Plascencia continue to draw The Shadow more like a force nature than a man throughout the comic, and Batman seems clumsy and unwieldy in the face of his supernatural opponent and former mentor.

The main highlight of Batman/The Shadow #2 is Rossmo continuing to draw The Shadow like a gun toting, will-o’-the-wisp, but Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando have also plotted a hell of decades spanning, complex, yet archetypical mystery. The Shadow deals in absolute good and evil, and that is why his nemesis, the Stag, is preying on the “best” people of Gotham, including Leslie Thompkins. Also, with the death of Lamont Cranston, he lacks a connection to humanity. By trotting out the wizened, old versions of his “agents”, including love interest Margot Lane, Snyder, Orlando, and Rossmo show that The Shadow is a manipulative bastard, who only had relationships with people to further his war on crime. Batman has acted this way sometimes too, like in Snyder and Greg Capullo’s “Death of the Family” storyline in Batman, and it’s interesting to see him be used by The Shadow as a kind of tour guide in Gotham to track down The Stag yet again.

There is an anarchic energy to Rossmo and Plascencia’s art in Batman/The Shadow #2, and it’s the furthest thing from superhero house style. Rossmo plays with the supernatural of the Shadow by making him barely fill out the edges of a panel and then having him collide into Batman like their opening hand to hand battle. His line is stronger any time there is the scene in the present or any kind of corporeal action while Rossmo uses a looser style for flashbacks, like Batman questioning the Shadow about the different identities and people he’s slain over the years. With his predominantly dark grey palette, Ivan Plascencia is a perfect choice for these two dark vigilantes even if the first splash page featuring The Shadow has a run of crimson too.

Batman/The Shadow continues to be the dark double of the classic “Beware the Gray Ghost” episode of Batman: The Animated Series where Batman meets Gary Trent, his childhood hero. Whereas that episode had a rose-colored, nostalgic view of the pulp heroes that inspired modern superheroes, Batman/The Shadow shows that these characters were intense and often disturbed. Batman may be a creature of the night, but after his early appearances in the 1930s, he never capped criminals in the head like The Shadow. They aren’t essential to the plot, but Batman’s conversations with Alfred, who he treats as a friend, ally, and not some disposable weapon, make his humanity shine. Along with Rossmo’s close-up of him dropping a bowl of soup when he hears that Leslie is in danger, it shows that Batman has friends and wants to help them instead of just following an obsessive quest to wipe out evil like The Shadow.

Scott Snyder, Steve Orlando, Riley Rossmo, and Ivan Plascencia continue to explore Batman’s violent, supernatural, and handgun wielding past in Batman/The Shadow #2. Except they add a twisting, turning mystery and an idiosyncratic art style to the mix so there’s a little for everyone in this intercompany crossover. There’s also just a touch of the old school pulps in the comic, like the swashbuckling duel between Batman and “Ducard” that opens the story.

Story: Scott Snyder and Steve Orlando Art: Riley Rossmo Colors: Ivan Plascencia
Story: 8 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Mini Reviews for the week ending 12/12/15

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Alex

Batman #47Batman #47* I could do with less Jim Gordon and more Bruce Wayne, if I’m being honest, but this was a solid comic. There’s certainly a crescendo we’re building toward here, and it’s gong to be glorious when it breaks. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Shadow #5 was a fairly decent ending to a story that, for the most part was pretty good. And I think that’s the problem here; the story arc was good, but it could have been better.Overall: 8 Recommendation: Read

The Precinct #1. Steam punk, cops and magic. It’s a great combination. Overall 8.75 Recommendation Buy

Heroes Vengeance #3 Yeah, it’s okay. I’m losing more interest issue by issue, which is a shame because this started off very strongly. Still, it’s worth a read – for now. Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read

The Troop #1 was an entertaining read. Starting a new superhero universe largely from scratch is never easy, but this one shows promise. It’s got the feel of early X-Men comics, but much less innocent, and in a much darker setting. Well worth checking out. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Read

 

Brett

Street Fighter Unlimited #1 (Udon Entertainment) – I haven’t read a Street Fighter comic in a long time, and appreciate the video game series (though wasn’t very good at it). This comic series feels like an extension of the video games series in a good way, a great adaptation, which is something that completely caught me off guard. You usually don’t see this quality in a video game comic adaptation. The story is solid, focusing on Ryo and the dark energy within him. You don’t need to know the greater Street Fighter world, again a good thing, to enjoy this first comic, everything is laid out perfectly for new and old fans alike. An absolute must get, can’t wait to see what comes down the road. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

 

Elana

Monstress_02Gotham Academy #13*: I miss Karl Kerschl’s art a lot. Adam Archer’s art style is cartoony but I find it unattractive but I will give him this: the characters of color are clearly drawn with distinctive features. Colorist Serge LaPointe does a great job with skin tones in particular. In a medium where everyone ends up looking white, even when they aren’t, touches like this are really important. Interesting character development here too. Overall 8 Recommendation: Buy

Angela Queen of Hel #2*: It just keeps getting better. I love how the comic is handling the romantic relationship between our two female leads. The jokes are killer. Sera (who is the best) insults Alanis Morissette’s song “Ironic”, quotes Pat Benatar and air guitars to Norse Metal. Her answer to “why do you know so much about everything” is essentially “because Bardic Knowledge +20”. Like I said, she’s the best. While the colorist is still making Sera too pale and Kim Jacinto draws her too thin Stephanie Hans nails it every time and her art is always stunning across the board. I’ve also heard that in the future, Sera’s skin-tone will be recolored to be brown as it’s supposed to be. Overall 9 Recommendation: Buy

Monstress #2: The best high fantasy series in ages. Beautiful and disturbing. A fantasy series for grown-ups. Issue 2 fleshes out the world and characters just the right amount and is full of unsettling revelations that feel “earned”. The 25 pages are absolutely packed with story and images you won’t find anywhere else. The costumes in this issue are outstanding. Overall 9.5 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write.

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

« Older Entries